Forums

2017

09

November 2017

Conversation with Katherine Nouri Hughes

Milken Institute
1250 Fourth Street
Santa Monica, CA 90401

At this Milken Institute Forum, author Katherine Nouri Hughes will discuss her book The Mapmaker’s Daughter (Delphinium Books; August 8, 2017) followed by a Q&A session and book signing. Introducing Hughes will be Lori Milken, co-founder of Delphinium Books. 

Narrating the spectacular story of her rise to the pinnacle of imperial power, Queen Mother Nurbanu, on her sickbed, is determined to understand how her bond with mapmakers daughter4greatest of all Ottoman sultans, Suleiman the Magnificent, shaped her destiny – not only as the wife of his successor but as the appointed enforcer of one of the Empire’s most crucial and shocking laws. Nurbanu spares nothing as she dissects the desires and motives that have propelled and harmed her; as she considers her role as devoted and manipulative mother; as she reckons her relations with the women of the Harem; and as she details the fate of the most sophisticated observatory in the world. Nurbanu sets out to “see” the causes and effects of her loves and choices, and she succeeds by means of unflinching candor – right up to the last shattering revelation.

About the Author

katharine hughes3Katherine Nouri Hughes, Iraqi-Irish by birth, attended Princeton University where she received a Masters Degree in Near Eastern Studies and where she serves on that department’s advisory council. She has published two books on k-12 education, was a communications executive in the for-profit and non-profit sectors, and serves on the boards of the American University in Cairo, the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra and WNET/13, the public television station. Her husband, Robert Del Tufo, former U.S. Attorney and Attorney General of New Jersey, died in 2016. She lives in Princeton, New Jersey and has two daughters and two grandchildren. The Mapmaker’s Daughter is her first novel.

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04

October 2017

Conversation with Steven Gaines

Milken Institute
1250 Fourth Street
Santa Monica, CA 90401

About the Event

At this Milken Institute Forum, Gaines will discuss his latest book, One of These Things First (Delphinium Books; September 5, 2017) followed by a Q&A session and book signing. Introducing Gaines will be Lori Milken, co-founder of Delphinium Books.

Gaines' memoir follows his trajectory from a 15-year-old Jewish boy in 1960's Brooklyn in his grandparent's bra and girdle store to, after a failed suicide attempt, a private room in one of the most exclusive psychiatric hospitals in the world. Here he meets a brilliant young psychiatrist who promises to cure him of his homosexuality and provide him with the normalcy he longs for. At the hospital he also meets a Broadway producer, the husband of superstar Mary Martin, who opens a new world for him, an editor who claims she was President John F. Kennedy's lover and other eccentric, wealthy neurotics, who make him feel like "Eliza Doolittle at the psycho country club."

The event is open to the public, and books will be made available for purchase.  

Speaker

Gaines HIFF3Steven Gaines is the bestselling author of Philistines at the Hedgerow: Passion and Property in the HamptonsThe Sky's the Limit: Passion and Property in ManhattanThe Love You Make: An Insider's Story of the Beatles; and Simply Halston, the biography of the fashion design, among other books. His journalism has appeared in Vanity Fair, the New York Observer, the New York Times and New York magazine where he was a contributing editor for 12 years. 

The co-founder and past vice-chairman of the Hamptons International Film Festival, Gaines has lived on the east end of Long Island for more than 40 years.  

Questions

For additional information, please contact us at events@milkeninstitute.org.

 

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19

June 2017

MATH Briefing - 2nd Quarter 2017: A Secure Financial Future for All Americans: Modernizing Our Broken System of Housing – Access and Affordability

MATH (Markets And The Hill) Briefing Series
Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C. 
By invitation only

 

Structural reform of the housing finance system by ending the dominance of Fannie and Freddie of the mortgage market can ultimately help expand economic opportunity, access, and affordability for the 21st Century American renter and homeowner. The Milken Institute’s recently released Part III, Affordable Rent and Access to Homeownership, in a series of papers on ‘A Secure Financial Future for All Americans: Modernizing Our Broken System of Housing’ authored by Michael Bright and Ed DeMarco, provides a more in-depth analysis on access and affordability and offers recommendations on how to produce broader and more sustainable access to credit for first-time home buyers and low- and moderate-income Americans as well as how to increase the supply of affordable rental housing. This briefing will explore these policy recommendations within the context of the broader discussion on comprehensive housing finance reform. 

Speakers

Michael Bright is a Director in the Milken Institute’s Center for Financial Markets. Bright worked as a trader of agency mortgage-backed securities and interest rate derivatives for six years, leaving Wachovia’s corporate and investment bank in 2008 at the height of the financial crisis to come to Washington. He worked at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency in the division of large bank supervision before joining the office of Sen. Bob Corker (R-TN) and serving as a principal author of S.1217, the “Corker-Warner” and later “Johnson-Crapo” housing finance reform bill. Bright has also been involved in the development of several credit risk transfer deals since leaving Capitol Hill.

Ed DeMarco is the President of the Financial Services Roundtable’s Housing Policy Council. DeMarco joined HPC from the Milken Institute’s Center for Financial Markets where he was a Senior Fellow in Residence since 2014. During his time at the Milken Institute, DeMarco was actively engaged in a variety of housing policy issues. Previously, DeMarco was chief operating officer and senior deputy director of the FHFA and its predecessor agency from 2006 to 2009. DeMarco’s federal service also included the Social Security Administration (2003 to 2006), where he was assistant deputy commissioner for policy; the Treasury Department (1994 to 2003), where he was director of the Office of Financial Institutions Policy; and the General Accounting Office (1986 to 1994).

Julia Gordon is the Executive Vice President of the National Community Stabilization Trust, which focuses on federal, state and local policies related to neighborhood stabilization, blight and foreclosure prevention. She also oversees the Neighborhood Stabilization Initiative, a program that provides local community development organizations with a “first look” opportunity to acquire Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac REO properties in 18 different cities. Prior to joining NCST, Gordon served as the Senior Director of Housing and Consumer Finance at the Center for American Progress (CAP). Other positions include managing the single-family policy team at the Federal Housing Finance Agency, serving as senior policy counsel at the Center for Responsible Lending, and working in a variety of positions in the legal aid field.

Doug Holtz-Eakin has a distinguished record as an academic, policy adviser, and strategist. Currently he is the President of the American Action Forum. Since 2001, he has served in a variety of important policy positions. In 2001 and 2002 he was Chief Economist of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. He was the 6th Director of the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office from 2003 to 2005. During 2007 and 2008 he was Director of Domestic and Economic Policy for the John McCain presidential campaign. More recently he has been and serves as an outside adviser to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.


For additional information, please contact Matthew Aleshire, Government Affairs Senior Associate at maleshire@milkeninstitute.org.

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16

May 2017

Sacramento Housing Forum: The Future of the State’s Housing Dilemma and its Economy

California Endowment
1414 K Street, #500
Sacramento, California 95814

The robustness of California’s long-neglected housing supply remains a vital component of any strategy to invest in human capital, promote economic development and provide social mobility. Yet cities throughout the state continue to struggle to develop adequate levels of housing. The housing crisis is not only one of supply, but the lack of adequate policy supporting the various types of development demanded by the marketplace.

Over the past 30 years, the precipitous rise in housing prices coupled, with development constraints and stagnant income growth, have cultivated a housing ecosystem that struggles to meet demand. According to the latest update from the PPIC, 31 percent of California’s homeowners and 46 percent of renters dedicate more than 35 percent of total household incomes to housing costs. Prices far exceed the means of buyers and renters in median income brackets, especially in urban and coastal communities, forcing workers to live far from job centers. Out-of-reach housing prices are an economic reality for many state’s residents. The long-term effects of this threaten to upend the California economy through productivity lost to lengthy commute times and a growing exodus of companies and residents leaving the state. It’s clearer than ever that California needs housing policies that cultivate long-term economic growth and offset decades of economically inefficient development patterns.

The Milken Institute, California Center in partnership with Capital Public Radio, The California Business Roundtable, and the Local Government Commission will bring together this forum, featuring:

diane yentel

chris estes

Diane Yentel

President & CEO / National Low Income Housing Coalition, Washington, D.C.

Chris Estes

President and CEO / National Housing Conference, Washington, D.C.

 

As well as other leading state policymakers, business and thought leaders, including:

  • Hon. Toni Atkins, Senator, District 39
  • Hon. Anna Caballero, Assembly member, District 30
  • Carol Galante, I. Donald Terner Distinguished Professor of Affordable Housing and Urban Policy, U.C. Berkeley, Terner Center
  • Jennifer Hernandez, Partner, Holland & Knight
  • Chris Hoene, Executive Director, California Budget and Policy Center
  • Hon. Chad Mayes, Assembly member, District 42, Minority Floor Leader
  • Kate Meis, Executive Director, Local Government Commission
  • Rob Lapsley, CEO, California Business Roundtable
  • Karen Parolek, Principal Opticos Design, Inc.
  • Shannon Peloquin, Associate Partner, McKinsey & Company
  • Hon. Darrell Steinberg, Mayor, City of Sacramento
  • Hon. Michael Tubbs, Mayor, City of Stockton
  • Hon. Scott Wiener, Senator, District 11

For additional information, contact Matt Horton, Associate Director, California Center at (310) 570-4617 or mhorton@milkeninstitute.org.

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27

March 2017

MATH Briefing - 1st Quarter 2017: Modernizing Financial Regulation for the 21st Century

MATH (Markets And The Hill) Briefing Series
Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C. 
By invitation only

Regulation has a vital role in a financial system—and changes in regulation were clearly needed in the wake of the financial crisis.  However, banking and other financial services cannot be entirely de-risked, at least not without losing the benefits of what we as a society expect from the financial sector.  The key challenge is to ensure that financial institutions cannot put taxpayers or the broad economy in peril when their business decisions do not work out.  This briefing will discuss potential policy improvements that the 115th Congress can make to ensure that the regulatory system protects consumers and the broader economy from undue harm without putting undue downward pressure on economic growth and financial innovation.

Speakers

Michael Bright is a director at the Milken Institute’s Center for Financial Markets (CFM), where he leads the housing program. In addition to housing finance, Bright works on issues related to international and domestic financial market regulation and policy. Prior to joining the Institute, Bright worked at PennyMac, an innovative mortgage finance firm founded in the wake of the housing crisis. Earlier, he was with the asset management company BlackRock. Bright worked in the office of U.S. Sen. Bob Corker, a Tennessee Republican, for four years. He advised on a range of Senate Banking Committee issues, including monetary policy, Dodd-Frank Act implementation, global market liquidity, and housing finance. Bright also spent two years in large bank supervision at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. Prior to coming to Washington, Bright spent six years as an interest rate derivatives trader and market-maker for both Wachovia Bank and Countrywide Financial. He holds a B.A. in international relations from Johns Hopkins University and an M.A. in the same discipline from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. 
 
Edward Knight is Executive Vice President and General Counsel of Nasdaq. In his role as General Counsel, Knight is responsible for providing legal counsel to senior management and for overseeing the quality of legal services across the global organization. He is also responsible for government relations, listing qualifications, market regulation and the office of economic research. In addition, Knight oversees the Office of Corporate Secretary, which is responsible for all of Nasdaq's corporate governance activities and maintaining the Corporate Record. Knight is the Chief Regulatory Officer of the NASDAQ Exchange. Knight served as the Chief Legal Officer of the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD, now FINRA) from June 1999 until becoming Nasdaq’s General Counsel in 2001. Before joining the NASD in 1999, Knight served as General Counsel of the U.S. Department of the Treasury from September 1994 to June 1999. A Texas native, Knight received his B.A., with honors, in Latin American Studies from the University of Texas at Austin and his J.D. from the University of Texas School of Law.
 
Phillip Swagel is a senior fellow at the Milken Institute and a professor at the School of Public Policy of the University of Maryland. Swagel was assistant secretary for economic policy at the Treasury Department from December 2006 to January 2009. In that position, he served as a member of the TARP investment committee and advised Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson on all aspects of economic policy. Swagel previously worked at the White House Council of Economic Advisers, the International Monetary Fund and the Federal Reserve, and taught economics at Northwestern University, the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University. He received a bachelor's degree in economics from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. 
 

 For additional information, please contact Matthew Aleshire, Government Affairs Senior Associate at maleshire@milkeninstitute.org.

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2016

16

November 2016

SoCal Storylines: Housing L.A.'s Future

Milken Institute
1250 Fourth Street
Santa Monica, CA 90401

Join us Wednesday, Nov 16, at the Milken Institute in Santa Monica, for the third installment of our series "SoCal Storylines: Conversations with movers and shakers," during which we'll examine housing. What's the future of affordable housing in Los Angeles? How are officials addressing housing for the homeless? What's being done to meet budget and infrastructure needs?

KPCC Correspondent Rina Palta will ask some of Southern California's most influential leaders, thinkers, movers and shakers to share their vision and ideas for the future of Los Angeles. We'll explore the many facets of Southern California's collective decision-making process, as well as the most productive strategies for growth, housing and infrastructure improvements.

Panelists:

Rick Cole, City Manager, Santa Monica Rick Cole, City Manager, Santa Monica
Mitch Katz, Director of the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services Mitch Katz, Director of the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services
Robin Hughes, President and CEO, Abode Communities Robin Hughes, President and CEO, Abode Communities
Moderated by: Rina Palta, KPCC Correspondent Moderated by: Rina Palta, KPCC Correspondent

 


Through these forward-looking public forums, the Milken Institute's California Center and KPCC – Southern California Public Radio, will dive deep into Southern California's regional issues, including transportation, workforce, housing and innovation. We'll talk to people on the front lines of those issues – and welcome you to join the conversation about how to solve some of our most vexing problems.

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27

October 2016

SBA-MI Partnership for Lending in Underserved Markets Launch: Los Angeles Launch Event

Los Angeles, CA 
By invitation only

11

October 2016

MATH Briefing – 4th Quarter 2016: The Role of Market Structure in the US Economy: Why Innovation Matters

MATH (Markets And The Hill) Briefing Series
Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C.
By invitation only

Well-functioning financial markets are integral to the growth of the U.S. economy, making it possible for businesses to access necessary funding as well as providing opportunities for investors to make productive use of their savings. How these markets are structured and regulated can significantly impact their effectiveness. Regulators face a never-ending set of trade-offs in which they must consider consumer protection, financial stability, and economic growth. Technology has transformed and will continue to transform our financial markets and spur innovation. This session will discuss the innovations taking place in market structure today and their impact on market quality: speed and fairness, market stability and resilience, market data, and small-cap liquidity including the SEC’s newly launched “tick size” pilot program to help the needs of smaller companies and their investors.

Speakers

Jamil Nazarali is head of execution services for Citadel Securities. He oversees Citadel Securities’ client market making offerings in equities and options. Prior to joining Citadel Securities in 2011, Nazarali was global head of electronic trading at Knight Capital Group. Previously, he was a management consultant at both Ernst and Young and Bain and Company. Nazarali serves on the Board of Directors of BATS Global Markets. He is also a member of the SEC Equity Market Structure Advisory Committee, Nasdaq Quality of Markets Committee and the SIFMA Market Response Committee. Nazarali received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Western Ontario and a MBA from the University of Chicago.

Eric Noll is president and chief executive officer of Convergex. He is a member of the SEC Equity Market Structure Advisory Committee and chair of the Market Quality Subcommittee. Prior to joining Convergex he was executive vice president, transaction services at Nasdaq OMX where he was responsible for all U.S. and U.K. equity, options and futures exchanges. Noll launched Nasdaq Liquidity Exchange in London and led the re-platforming of Nasdaq Futures Exchange. He was also responsible for Espeed and the Nasdaq fixed income business as well as all access services revenue lines including co-location, ports, memberships, cross-connects, microwave offering, and pre-trade risk management. From 1994 to 2009, he was managing director with Susquehanna International Group. Noll received his A.B. from Franklin and Marshall College, where is a member of the Board of Trustees, and earned his MBA from Vanderbilt University.

Joseph Gawronski is the president and chief operating officer of Rosenblatt Securities. Gawronski is formerly a securities lawyer with Sullivan & Cromwell, a vice president in the equities division with Salomon Smith Barney and chief operating officer of Linx, an alternative block trading system. He is a member of the Advisory Board of the Journal of Trading and a member of the Board of the National Organization of Investment Professionals. He received his B.A. in public and international affairs at Princeton University and his J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Moderator

Jim Angel is associate professor of finance at the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University, where he teaches in the graduate and executive programs. Angel specializes in the structure and regulation of financial markets around the world, and he has visited over 70 financial exchanges around the world. Angel has served as a visiting academic fellow in residence at the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD – now FINRA) and also as a visiting economist at the Shanghai Stock Exchange. He has also been chairman of the Nasdaq Economic Advisory Board, a member of the OTC Bulletin Board Advisory Committee, and has served on the board of the DirectEdge stock exchanges. Angel received a Bachelor of Science degree from the California Institute of Technology, his MBA from Harvard Business School, and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.


For additional information, please contact Matthew Aleshire, Government Affairs Associate at maleshire@milkeninstitute.org.

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27

September 2016

MATH Briefing - 3rd Quarter 2016: A Secure Financial Future for All Americans: Modernizing Our Broken System of Housing

MATH (Markets And The Hill) Briefing Series
Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C.
By invitation only

Owning a home is a defining aspect of the American Dream for most Americans. Access to affordable housing – both ownership and rental – is critical to a vibrant middle class. Yet eight years after the mortgage meltdown, America’s housing system remains broken. Structural flaws plague the system, which serves neither taxpayers nor homeowners properly. Reform is required to enable a system more able to assist all Americans in gaining access to housing in a responsible way. This briefing will examine methods to reform the secondary mortgage market structure, enabling capital markets to operate efficiently and transparently. Policies for aligning incentives across the mortgage ecosystem will be addressed, including replacing the failed GSE structure with a mix of market mechanisms as well as appropriate government standard setting and oversight to ensure a deep and liquid market.

SPEAKERS

Sumit Agarwal is professor of finance at the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University. Previously, he was the vice-dean of research and the Low Tuck Kwong professor at the School of Business and a professor in the departments of Economics, Finance and Real Estate at the National University of Singapore. Before that he was a senior financial economist in the research department at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and prior to joining the Chicago Fed, he was a senior vice president and credit risk management executive in the Small Business Risk Solutions Group of Bank of America. Sumit’s research interests include issues relating to financial institutions, household finance, behavioral finance, international finance, real estate markets and capital markets. Additionally, he has co-edited a collected volume on Household Credit Usage: Personal Debt and Mortgages. He also runs a blog on household financial decision making called Smart Finance.

Michael Bright is a director at the Milken Institute’s Center for Financial Markets (CFM), where he leads the housing program. In addition to housing finance, Bright works on issues related to international and domestic financial market regulation and policy. Prior to joining the Institute, Bright worked at PennyMac, an innovative mortgage finance firm founded in the wake of the housing crisis. Earlier, he was with the asset management company BlackRock. Bright worked in the office of U.S. Sen. Bob Corker, a Tennessee Republican, for four years. He advised on a range of Senate Banking Committee issues, including monetary policy, Dodd-Frank Act implementation, global market liquidity, U.S.-Chinese economic relations and housing finance. He was the principal author of S.1217, the "Corker-Warner" GSE reform bill that passed the Banking Committee in 2014 and helps guide Federal Housing Finance Agency policy. Bright also spent two years in large bank supervision at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. Prior to coming to Washington, Bright spent six years as an interest rate derivatives trader and market-maker for both Wachovia Bank and Countrywide Financial. He holds a B.A. in international relations from Johns Hopkins University and an M.A. in the same discipline from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

Ed DeMarco is a senior fellow in residence at the Milken Institute Center for Financial Markets, where he researches issues involving housing finance, housing policy and financial institution regulation. He is a widely sought expert and frequent public speaker on housing finance. In 2015 he was a visiting professor at the Owen Graduate School of Management at Vanderbilt University. From 2009 to 2014, DeMarco served as acting director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), the conservator for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and regulator of those companies and the Federal Home Loan Banks. Previously, DeMarco was chief operating officer and senior deputy director of the FHFA and its predecessor agency from 2006 to 2009. DeMarco’s federal service also included the Social Security Administration (2003 to 2006), where he was assistant deputy commissioner for policy; the Treasury Department (1994 to 2003), where he was director of the Office of Financial Institutions Policy; and the General Accounting Office (1986 to 1994). He received a B.A. in economics from the University of Notre Dame and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Maryland.

Julia Gordon is the executive vice president of the National Community Stabilization Trust, a non-profit organization that aims to restore vacant and abandoned properties to productive use and protect neighborhoods from blight. As a national expert on housing finance, mortgage, and foreclosure issues, Gordon drives NCST's policy work, which focuses on federal, state and local policies related to neighborhood stabilization, blight and foreclosure prevention. She also oversees the Neighborhood Stabilization Initiative, a program that provides local community development organizations with a “first look” opportunity to acquire Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac REO properties in 18 different cities. Prior to joining NCST, Gordon served as the Senior Director of Housing and Consumer Finance at the Center for American Progress (CAP). Other positions include managing the single-family policy team at the Federal Housing Finance Agency, serving as senior policy counsel at the Center for Responsible Lending, and working in a variety of positions in the legal aid field. Gordon received her bachelor's degree in government from Harvard College and her J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Phillip Swagel is a professor at the School of Public Policy of the University of Maryland and a senior fellow at the Milken Institute. Swagel was assistant secretary for economic policy at the Treasury Department from December 2006 to January 2009. In that position, he served as a member of the TARP investment committee and advised Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson on all aspects of economic policy. Swagel previously worked at the White House Council of Economic Advisers, the International Monetary Fund and the Federal Reserve, and taught economics at Northwestern University, the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University. He received a bachelor's degree in economics from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. 


For additional information, please contact Matthew Aleshire, Government Affairs Associate at maleshire@milkeninstitute.org

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26

September 2016

SBA-MI Partnership for Lending in Underserved Markets Launch

Baltimore, MD
By invitation only

color20SBA20black20logo20and20signature MilkenInstitute logo BB Cropped

About the Partnership for Lending in Underserved Markets (PLUM) Initiative
The PLUM Initiative is a joint effort by the U.S. Small Business Administration and the Milken Institute to identify and implement practical recommendations to increase lending to underserved markets. The initiative will focus on piloting efforts to enhance access to capital for minority-owned small businesses in two markets. The Baltimore pilot initiative, in particular, will focus on African-American-owned small businesses, while the Los Angeles initiative will focus on both African-American and Hispanic-owned small businesses. Both demographics, in particular, suffered greatly during and after the recent financial crisis and small business lending to underserved markets in Baltimore and Los Angeles, indeed nationally, has yet to recover.

Contact Aron Betru, managing director of the Center for Financial Markets, or Kevin Klowden, executive director of the California Center, for more information.

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20

September 2016

SoCal Storylines: Revitalizing our cities

Milken Institute
1250 Fourth Street
Santa Monica, CA 90401

As a global leader in entertainment, aerospace, international trade and higher education, Southern California enjoys an abundance of resources to aid in the region’s further development. It also has the nation’s most diverse population and is a hub for manufacturing and innovation. But Southern Californians face challenges in living up to the region’s economic potential.

Join us Tuesday, September 20, at the Milken Institute in Santa Monica, for the second installment of our series "SoCal Storylines: Conversations with movers and shakers," during which we’ll examine revitalization and infrastructure. How should L.A. officials deal with the city’s structural deficit? How are we developing our next generation of skilled workers? What's in the works to improve the city’s infrastructure, workforce, and overall quality of life? 

KPCC managing editor for news, Ben Bergman, KPCC SoCal Economy Senior Reporter, will ask some of Southern California’s most influential leaders, thinkers, movers and shakers to share their vision and ideas for the future of Los Angeles. We’ll explore the many facets of Southern California’s collective decision-making process, as well as the most productive strategies for growth, workforce development and infrastructure improvements.

Moderator

Ben Bergman, KPCC SoCal Economy Senior Reporter

Featured Guests

Aja Brown, Mayor of Compton
Madeline Janis, Executive Director of Jobs to Move America and co-founder of the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy (LAANE)
Miguel Santana, Chief Administrative Officer of the City of Los Angeles

 

@KPCCInPerson
@MilkenInstitute
#SoCalStorylines

This event is part of our series "SoCal Storylines: Conversations with movers and shakers." Through these forward-looking public forums, the Milken Institute’s California Center and KPCC, Southern California Public Radio, will dive deep into Southern California’s regional issues, including transportation, workforce, housing and innovation. We’ll talk to people on the front lines of those issues – and welcome you to join the conversation about how to solve some of our most vexing problems.

RSVP FOR THIS EVENT

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23

August 2016

SoCal Storylines: Navigating the Transportation of Tomorrow

Tateuchi Democracy Forum
Japanese American National Museum
100 North Central Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90012

As a global leader in entertainment, aerospace, international trade and higher education, Southern California enjoys an abundance of resources to aid in the region’s further development. It also has the nation’s most diverse population and is a hub for manufacturing and innovation. But Southern Californians face challenges in living up to the region’s economic potential. 

Join us Tuesday, August 23, at the Japanese American National Museum in downtown Los Angeles, for the first installment of our series "Storylines: Conversations with SoCal Movers and Shakers," during which we’ll examine transportation. What’s the future of transportation in Los Angeles? How is mass transit evolving? What’s next for L.A.’s airports? How will future Angelenos navigate Southern California?

Join KPCC’s commuting and mobility reporter Meghan McCarty, and some of Southern California’s most influential leaders, thinkers, movers and shakers as they share their vision and ideas for the future of Los Angeles. We’ll ask the panel and audience to consider the many facets of Southern California’s collective decision-making process, as well as the most productive strategies for growth, workforce development and infrastructure improvements.

Featured Guests:

Phil Washington, chief executive officer of the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority  

Deborah Flint, chief executive officer of Los Angeles World Airports (LAWA)

This event is part of our series "SoCal Storylines: Conversations with movers and shakers." Through these forward-looking public forums, the Milken Institute California Center and KPCC, Southern California Public Radio, will dive deep into Southern California’s regional issues, including transportation, workforce, housing and innovation. We’ll talk to people on the front lines of those issues – and welcome you to join the conversation about how to solve some of our most vexing problems.

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16

June 2016

MATH Briefing - 2nd Quarter 2016:  Investing in America’s Infrastructure: Challenges and Solutions to Close the Funding Gap

MATH (Markets And The Hill) Briefing Series
Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C. 
By invitation only

Private investment is critical to close the funding gaps in our nation’s infrastructure left by strained public coffers at all levels of government across the United States. It is imperative that additional investment is unlocked to augment the public funds allocated for infrastructure spending. At the end of 2015, Congress passed the FAST Act, authorizing over $300 billion in spending through fiscal year 2020 on surface transportation programs including rail, highway, and public transportation. Yet it is apparent that the magnitude of investment needed to fully repair and upgrade aging infrastructure across the United States, estimated by the American Society of Civil Engineers to cost over $3 trillion by 2020, requires a paradigm shift in thinking. This briefing will explore some of the innovative approaches that are available to tap into previously unused sources of capital and what role public policy can play to spur on widespread private investment in infrastructure across industry sectors and meet the requirements of the U.S. economy in the 21st century.

Speakers

Tyler Duvall is a principal with McKinsey & Company and leads McKinsey’s work with public sector infrastructure agencies and investors in infrastructure assets. He has also worked extensively developing strategies for nonprofits. Prior to his time with McKinsey, Duvall was both the undersecretary (acting) and assistant secretary for transportation policy at the U.S. Department of Transportation following his confirmation by the U.S. Senate in 2006. Prior to joining the Department of Transportation, Duvall worked for Hogan & Hartson LLP (now Hogan Lovells) as a business and finance lawyer focused on mergers and acquisitions. He has a J.D. from University of Virginia Law School and a B.A. in Economics from Washington & Lee University.

Susan Gray is the global head of infrastructure for Standard & Poor's newly established sixth global practice, which includes project finance, midstream energy, oil refining, merchant power, renewables, airports, roads, ports and public-private partnerships. She also leads Standard & Poor's efforts to uphold its leading role in providing credit benchmarks, ratings and analytics to the infrastructure market. Previously, Gray was head of infrastructure sponsor coverage and head of airports at Macquarie Capital in North America. While at Macquarie she also worked in Asia, Australia and the Americas. Prior to joining Macquarie, Susan served as an advisor to the Australian government on trade policy, industry policy and labor policy. She is a trustee of the internationally regarded Lower East Side Tenement Museum in New York and an NACD Fellow. Susan holds an honors degree in economics and a law degree from the University of Sydney.

Keith Hennessey is a principal vice president and the head of Bechtel’s Public-Private Partnership business with responsibilities for managing Bechtel’s P3 equity investing and financing, design-build and operations and maintenance activities. Previously, Hennessey was the manager of strategy and business development for Bechtel Infrastructure. He also served as the executive assistant to Bechtel’s CEO. Hennessey has over 20 years of experience in the investment banking industry. Previously, Hennessey worked for Morgan Stanley and Bank of America in a variety of roles including global chief operating officer and head of the U.S. industrial group at Morgan Stanley Investment Banking and head of Bank of America’s Diversified Industrial Group. Hennessey graduated from Georgetown University and received an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School. 

James Pass is senior managing director, municipal and infrastructure sector manager and portfolio manager at Guggenheim. Pass joined Guggenheim in 2009 and is responsible for the research, development and implementation of investment strategies for the firm’s municipal obligations, including tax-exempt and taxable bonds, Build America Bonds and tax-credit bonds. He is responsible for building and managing the firm’s military housing and municipal hybrid activities, including infrastructure investing. Pass and his Municipal Investment Team increased municipal holdings and were instrumental in launching multiple funds. Prior to joining Guggenheim, Pass was managing director at RBC Capital Markets, where he headed the firm’s Midwest Region. He has spoken to industry associations including the White House Business Council, the National Federation of Municipal Analysts and the National Association of State Treasurers, and has been featured in publications including Bloomberg and the Bond Buyer. He holds a B.A. in diplomatic history and political science from the University of Pennsylvania.

Moderator

Sandeep Dahiya is an associate professor of finance at Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business and has been on the faculty since 1999. Dahiya spent two years working in the corporate finance and strategy practice of McKinsey and Company, a leading strategy consulting firm. He worked with CEOs and CFOs of Fortune 500 firms in health care, financial services and chemical industries focusing on valuation, mergers and acquisitions, capital markets and risk management issues. He has also consulted for leading law firms on corporate finance issues. His work has been published in the Journal of Finance, Journal of Financial Economics, Journal of Corporate Finance, and Financial Markets, Institutions and Instruments. Dahiya received his Ph.D. in finance from New York University.

For additional information, please contact Matthew Aleshire, Government Affairs Associate at maleshire@milkeninstitute.org.

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23

March 2016

MATH Briefing - 1st Quarter 2016:  A 21st Century Tax Code: Implications for American Jobs and the Economy

MATH (Markets And The Hill) Briefing Series
Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C.
By invitation only

It has been almost 30 years since the last major overhaul of the nation’s tax code. The global economy and international financial system have been transformed in the interceding years. While news of multinational inversions and corporate mergers often provokes a discussion of international tax reform here in Washington, other nations are moving forward with their own initiatives. The OECD’s Base Erosion and Profit Shifting project, known as BEPS, is advancing policies that are not widely considered to be in the best interests of the United States. Consequently, a consensus is emerging that the U.S. needs a tax code tailored to the realities of the 21st century to compete in the global economy.

This briefing will examine the United States’ current international taxation system as well as proposals emanating from abroad, such as BEPS. The impact of the current system on companies and communities will be addressed, along with the potential next steps Congress can take to modernize our tax code and build a stronger, fairer, more competitive international tax system.

SPEAKERS

Dorothy Coleman is vice president of tax and domestic economic policy at the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM). She is responsible for informing NAM members about tax-related issues and representing the association’s position to Congress, the administration and the media. As NAM spokesperson on tax policy issues, Coleman coordinates membership coalitions; prepares testimony, reports and analyses; and responds to media inquiries. From April 1998 to April 2000, she was NAM’s director of tax policy. Previously, she worked at Arthur Andersen, serving as a manager in the Office of Federal Tax Services. Earlier, she was chief legislative reporter for the Bureau of National Affairs’ Daily Tax Report. Coleman received a B.A. in economics from Manhattanville College and a law degree from Georgetown University Law Center.

Cathy Koch is the Ernst & Young Americas tax policy leader. Previously, she served as chief policy advisor to the Senate majority leader on tax and economics. Koch also led business outreach for the Senate leader and the Democratic Caucus, heading tax and economic policy initiatives for the leader’s office and playing a central role in strategy and communications for a broad range of issues. Previous positions include tax chief of the Senate Finance Committee and staff director of the Finance Subcommittee on Energy, Natural Resources and Infrastructure. During her tenure, she led the development of tax titles in legislation on energy, housing, agriculture, banking, TARP, stimulus and health care. Earlier, Koch spent two years as the director of U.S. tax policy for General Electric. She has also served as a director of global government affairs at Amgen Inc. Koch holds a B.A. in economics from Millersville University and a Ph.D. in economics from Georgetown University.

Raymond Wiacek is a partner at Jones Day, where his practice involves the tax and business aspects of financial and international transactions, including structured and cross-border financings, mergers and acquisitions, transfer pricing and international licensing and related planning for intellectual property. Wiacek led the worldwide team integrating Warner-Lambert and Pharmacia with Pfizer after those acquisitions. He recently negotiated and closed a number of cross-border financings for Bank of America, against many leading European banks. In addition to Bank of America and Pfizer, Wiacek’s representative clients include Bridgestone/ Firestone, Dow Corning, Isuzu Motors, Morgan Stanley, Transworld Oil and United Coal. He has also served as an adjunct tax professor at Georgetown University Law Center. Wiacek holds a B.A. from Yale University and J.D. from Harvard University. 

For additional information, please contact Matthew Aleshire, Government Affairs Associate at maleshire@milkeninstitute.org.

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26

January 2016

Imperial Gamble: Putin, Ukraine, and the New Cold War

Santa Monica

Imperial Gamble: Putin, Ukraine, and the New Cold War

As a former Moscow correspondent and bureau chief, Marvin Kalb has a keen understanding of Vladimir Putin and his plans to expand Russia's regional and global influence. In his new book "Imperial Gamble: Putin, Ukraine, and the New Cold War," Kalb provides historical context to the conflict in Ukraine and explains Putin's rise and the roots of Russian nationalism. Kalb goes back centuries to explain the events that created the tension between Russia and Ukraine and led to Putin's invasion of Crimea. Kalb argues that the decision was not as sudden as it appeared. Soon after the pro-Western demonstrations in Ukraine in late 2013, Putin realized military action would be required to prevent Ukraine from joining the West.

The effect of Putin's actions on East-West relations raises more than a few questions about the future world order. The need for Western scholars and policymakers to understand Putin, his motives and his goals is greater than ever. "Putin, like most leaders, has short-term goals and long-term goals, sometimes pursuing both at the same time," Kalb writes. "In pursuit of his goals, he improvises, he plays games, he feints, he prods and pokes, and, when necessary, he pauses and maybe retreats. But he does have a strategy, propelled by a narrow vision of Russian history, and he pursues it with an odd mix of rigidity and occasional flexibility."

Will Washington and Moscow stumble into a confrontation leading to an unwanted conflict? How did we get to this point? Kalb provides carefully considered answers, calling for a policy based on realism. He also outlines options for what we should do next, and explains their likely consequences.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Marvin Kalb

Marvin Kalb is a nonresident senior fellow with the foreign policy program at Brookings Institution. He also serves as a senior adviser at the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and is a Murrow professor emeritus at Harvard University. In his long and distinguished career, he served as the chief diplomatic correspondent for CBS and NBC, Moscow bureau chief and the host of NBC's "Meet the Press." Kalb studies the impact of media on public policy and politics and is also an expert in national security, with a focus on U.S. relations with Russia, Europe and the Middle East.

ABOUT THE MODERATOR

Jerrold Green

Jerrold Green is the president and CEO of the Pacific Council on International Policy. He also is a research professor of communications at the University of Southern California. Prior to this, Green held multiple positions at RAND Corp., including director of the Center for Middle East Public Policy, and taught at the Center for Near Eastern and North African Studies at the University of Michigan. He also was director of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Arizona. Green holds a B.A. from the University of Massachusetts Boston and an M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from the University of Chicago.

"Imperial Gamble: Putin, Ukraine, and the New Cold War" will be on sale after the Forum, and the author will be available to sign copies.

This event is open to the public, although registration is required. Reserved seating is available for Milken Institute Associates. If you are not currently a member of the Associates and would like to join or receive more information, click here. Parking is not available at the Institute. Free parking for 90 minutes is available in Public Parking Lot No. 1 on Fourth Street, adjacent to our building.

This Forum is part of our effort to present multiple perspectives on current business and public policy issues. Videotaping, recording or photographing this event is prohibited without the prior approval of the Milken Institute.

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20

January 2016

California's Innovation-Based Economy: A Regional Perspective on the Bay Area and Silicon Valley

San Jose, CA

Co-Hosted by the Milken Institute, the Bay Area Council and San Jose's Office of Economic Development

In the global race for innovation and economic growth, California and in particular the Bay Area and Silicon Valley enjoy advantages that other states—and nations—envy. The region is home to diverse knowledge-based industries, from social media to biomedical technology, and its universities and entrepreneurs are adept at turning technological breakthroughs into billion-dollar businesses. Innovation is critical to the creation of high-quality, high-wage, sustainable jobs and economic growth, which, in turn, support a rising tax base throughout the state.

This event will feature a conversation between San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo and Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren focused on the innovation-based economy of the Bay Area and Silicon Valley. The event will also highlight the Institute's recently published "Best-Performing Cities 2015" rankings (best-cities.org), which established San Jose and San Francisco as the nation's current premier metros for economic performance.

Following the conversation with the mayor and congresswoman, a panel of the area's top business leaders and policymakers will discuss the implications of the innovation-based economy and 21st century market trends, providing models and lessons to help other regions maintain and enhance innovation, investment and growth. Moderated by Micah Weinberg, president of the Bay Area Council Economic Institute, the panel will include business leaders and regional experts on the innovation economy.

This event is open to the public and the media.

SPEAKERS

Sam Liccardo Sam Liccardo, Mayor, San Jose. Taking office at the age of 44, Liccardo became the 65th mayor of San Jose and one of the youngest in the city's modern history, but in his brief tenure, San Jose has already surged. In the early months of his term, Liccardo has worked to forge a tentative agreement for pension and retiree health-care reform with public safety unions, launch a summer jobs program for hundreds of teens living in gang-impacted neighborhoods, expand innovative afterschool programs for children in low-income communities, announce new international flights to Beijing, secure the expanded presence of major tech companies in San Jose, and successfully conclude lengthy negotiations to keep the National Hockey League's Sharks franchise in San Jose.

Zoe Lofgren Zoe Lofgren, Member, U.S. House of Representatives, 19th District of California. U.S. Rep. Zoe Lofgren has been a Democratic member of the House since 1995. She represents the 19th District of California, based in San Jose, the "Capital of Silicon Valley." As the highest-ranking Democrat and former chair of the Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security and a longtime immigration attorney and law professor, Lofgren is recognized as a champion of comprehensive immigration reform and a national leader in immigration policy. During the 113th Congress, she played a key role in negotiating a comprehensive reform bill as part of a bipartisan working group.

Ross DeVol Ross DeVol, Chief Research Officer, Milken Institute. Ross DeVol oversees research on international, national and comparative regional growth performance; access to capital and its role in economic growth and job creation; and health-related topics. He has put his group in the national limelight with groundbreaking research on technology and its impact on regional and national economies, and on the economic and human consequences of chronic disease. He specializes in the effects of technology, research and development, international trade, human capital and skills training, entrepreneurship, early-stage financing, and quality-of-place issues on the geographic distribution of economic activity. DeVol is ranked among the "Super Stars" of Think Tank Scholars by International Economy magazine.

Micah Weinbe Micah Weinberg, President, Bay Area Council Economic Institute. As president of the Economic Institute at the Bay Area Council, Micah Weinberg manages a team of professional researchers who produce world-class economic and policy analysis and insight. The Council advocates for a strong, sustainable, equitable economy and better quality of life for residents of the region. Previously, Weinberg served as senior policy advisor to the Bay Area Council and senior research fellow at the Economic Institute, where he focused on maximizing health through radically reworking how we pay for, deliver and think about health care.

munoz Peter Leroe-Muñoz, Vice President, Technology & Innovation Policy, Silicon Valley Leadership Group. Peter Leroe-Muñoz is the Vice-President of Technology & Innovation Policy for the Silicon Valley Leadership Group. In this role, he heads the Leadership Group’s federal and state policy efforts on technology issues, including Cybersecurity, Data Privacy, IoT, and Patent Litigation Reform, among others. Prior to joining the Leadership Group, Peter worked as In-House Counsel for a Bay Area financial advisory firm specializing in municipal securities. Before that position, he served as a Deputy District Attorney in San Benito County for nearly six years. Peter is active within the community, and serves on the Gilroy City Council. He was elected to the Council in 2010 as one of the youngest councilmembers in city history. He serves as Gilroy’s representative on the Cities Association of Santa Clara County, the Santa Clara Valley Water District, and the Silicon Valley Regional Interoperability Authority.

nikcarlson

Nik Carlson, Principal Economist, AECOM. Nik Carlson has over 23 years of planning and economic analysis experience providing consulting services to public and private sector clients throughout California and nationwide.  He specializes in economic development, transportation, natural resource and public-private partnership (PPP) analyses. From his economic feasibility, fiscal and community impact analysis experience, Nik has a project-level perspective of the development challenges and opportunities facing the Bay Area’s public and private sectors.

 


Kevin Klowden, Executive Director, California Center and Managing Economist, Milken Institute. Kevin Klowden is a managing economist at the Milken Institute and executive director of its California Center, which focuses on economic issues connected to job creation, technology-based development and California's role in the global economy. He is the lead author of multiple key works on the economics of the entertainment industry, including "A Hollywood Exit: What California Must Do to Remain Competitive in Entertainment--and Keep Jobs" as well as "Strategies for Expanding California's Exports" and the "State Technology and Science Index." Klowden has written, spoken and testified about the importance of a skilled and educated workforce in maintaining California's competitiveness. He holds graduate degrees from the University of Chicago and London School of Economics.

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2015

15

December 2015

MATH Briefing - 4th Quarter 2015: Blockchain: Bitcoin-Powering Technology and Its Potential Impact on Financial Markets

MATH (Markets And The Hill) Briefing Series 
Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C. 
By invitation only

The "blockchain" that underlies Bitcoin and similar distributed ledger technologies has the potential to create maximum disruption across financial markets and products. While Bitcoin was initially viewed as a rival to flat currencies, others have looked at the enabling technology as a way to inexpensively and securely handle everything from securities settlements to land title tracking. Some companies are even moving beyond the "currency" element, creating products that are designed to compete with databases and legacy money movement systems, rather than the currency itself. In this rapidly developing environment, regulators at the state, federal and international level are seeking to create and enforce rules that prevent abuse and protect consumers without stifling potentially world-changing innovation. This session will focus on and explore the following issues: 1) What is blockchain? What is Bitcoin and why does its underlying technology have such a large disruptive potential? 2) How can virtual currencies and their foundational technologies be used, both as currency and in other applications? 3) What is the state of play for the financial industry and regulators in the U.S. and beyond? 4) How can lawmakers anticipate and react to the challenges?

SPEAKERS
James Angel is associate professor of finance at the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University, where he teaches in the graduate and executive programs. Angel specializes in the structure and regulation of financial markets around the world, and he has visited over 70 financial exchanges around the world. Angel has served as a visiting academic fellow in residence at the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD – now FINRA) and also as a visiting economist at the Shanghai Stock Exchange. He has also been chairman of the Nasdaq Economic Advisory Board, a member of the OTC Bulletin Board Advisory Committee, and has served on the board of the DirectEdge stock exchanges. Angel received a Bachelor of Science degree from the California Institute of Technology, his MBA from Harvard Business School, and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.

Dominick Paniscotti is associate vice president of enterprise architecture, Nasdaq. Paniscotti manages the systems and performance engineering team at NASDAQ where he is responsible for the architecture, design and performance of NASDAQ's U.S. market systems. Paniscotti's experience spans over 25 years and he has been employed in senior technology roles in a variety of business organizations in the telecommunications, defense and securities industries. While at NASDAQ, Paniscotti's efforts have resulted in marked performance enhancements to the trading systems and, most significantly, the genesis of the NASDAQ's next-generation architecture for these systems. As part of NASDAQ's system's architecture team, Paniscotti is tasked with the identification and integration of innovative technologies into NASDAQ's trading platforms. These initiatives include cloud computing, software defined networking, big data, data analytics, and blockchain technologies.

Fredrik Voss is vice president of blockchain strategy, Nasdaq where he is responsible for Nasdaq's blockchain innovation initiative. In this role he is advising the C-suite on corporate objectives and strategies for Nasdaq's activities in the blockchain space and also responsible for implementation and communication of approved strategies. Before August 2015, Voss held the position as deputy head of Nasdaq Commodities where he was responsible for the management of Nasdaq Commodities' European activities. Nasdaq Commodities lists futures and options for trading and clearing in energy, freight and seafood markets. Voss' main responsibilities were the day-to-day management of Nasdaq Commodoties and to ensure the commercial success of the business. Between 2004 and 2005 Voss worked for the Intercontinental Exchange in London, where he was heading up the market development team for ICE's European operation. Before joining ICE, Voss worked at Nasdaq's predecessory OMX from 1995 where he managed various business units supplying exchange and clearing solutions to deregulated electricity markets.

Staci Warden is the executive director of the Center for Financial Markets at the Milken Institute, where she leads initiatives on strengthening capital markets, access to capital, financial education and financial-markets solutions, among others. Prior to joining the Milken Institute, she spent six years with JPMorgan in London, where she ran JPMorgan's Central Bank client franchise in Europe, Eurasia and Africa, and two years in New York as part of the sovereign-debt-restructuring deal team. Before joining JPMorgan, she was director at Nasdaq, where she led their two initiatives for micro-cap companies, the BBX and the OTCBB. Warden holds a master's of public policy from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, with a concentration in international trade and finance, and has completed her coursework for a Ph.D. in economics from Brandeis University.

MODERATOR
Sandeep Dahiya is an associate professor of finance at Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business. He is also an associate director of the Center for Financial Markets and Policy. Dahiya's research focuses on corporate finance, corporate restructuring, entrepreneurial finance, banking and financial institutions. His work has been published in numerous finance journals, including the Journal of Finance, Review of Financial Studies, Journal of Financial Economics, Journal of Business, Journal of Corporate Finance, and Journal of Banking and Finance. Bahiya spent two years working in the corporate finance and strategy practice at McKinsey & Company, a leading strategy consulting firm. He has also consulted for leading law firms on corporate finance issues. Before earning his Ph.D., he spent three years with ICICI Bank, the second-largest financial institution in India. Dahiya received a bachelor's degree and MBA from the Indian Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. in finance from New York University.

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01

December 2015

The Conservative Heart: How to Build a Fairer, Happier and More Prosperous America

Santa Monica

ConservativeHeart Cover A with NYT bestseller sticker

In the battle for hearts and minds, conservatives too often forget about the heart. One result of this omission is a widespread perception that conservatives simply don’t care about people, says author Arthur C. Brooks.

In “The Conservative Heart: How to Build a Fairer, Happier, and More Prosperous America,” Brooks argues that nothing could be further from the truth. Conservatives actually hold the moral high ground, he says, but have done a poor job of telling their story. Brooks, president of the Washington-based think tank American Enterprise Institute, moves beyond standard conservative talking points to encourage an approach focused on fairness and compassion for society’s most vulnerable. Brooks’ case for conservatism is rooted in a conviction that the conservative values of free enterprise and self-reliance provide the best framework for fighting poverty and inequality. He prescribes seven habits conservatives should develop to better communicate the humanitarian side of their philosophy. “We need to stop focusing just on what we are against and boldly proclaim what we stand for,” Brooks writes. “We need to put forward a hopeful, optimistic governing agenda.”

“Arthur Brooks understands not only that the way we think shapes the way we speak, but that the way we speak about social problems such as poverty and opportunity conditions the way we act. A thinking person’s primer for a conservative politics of human flourishing,” writes columnist George F. Will.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Arthur Brooks Headshot 2015

Arthur C. Brooks is president of the American Enterprise Institute, a nonpartisan public policy think tank in Washington, D.C. He also holds the institute’s Beth and Ravenel Curry Chair in Free Enterprise. Previously, Brooks was the Louis A. Bantle professor of business and government policy at Syracuse University. Before pursuing his work in public policy, Brooks spent 12 years as a classical musician in the U.S. and Spain. He is the author of 11 books and hundreds of articles on topics including government, fairness, economic opportunity, happiness, and the morality of free enterprise. Previous books include the New York Times bestseller "The Road to Freedom: How to Win the Fight for Free Enterprise." His other books include "The Battle," "Gross National Happiness," "Social Entrepreneurship" and "Who Really Cares." Brooks has a Ph.D. and an M.Phil. in policy analysis from the RAND Graduate School. 

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19

November 2015

Between Debt and the Devil: Money, Credit and Fixing Global Finance

Santa Monica

Adair

When the financial crisis struck in 2008, households and businesses in advanced economies were so deeply leveraged that private-sector debt exceeded GDP in some countries. Was the growth of credit and private debt in decades leading up to the collapse a contributor to economic growth or a precursor to the meltdown?

Adair Turner was named chairman of the UK Financial Services Authority in 2008, just as the crisis was unfolding. His position at the FSA, and his role as chairman of the International Financial Stability Board’s major policy committee, gave him deep insight into the causes and consequences of the crisis.

At this Milken Institute Forum, the author of “Between Debt and the Devil: Money, Credit, and Fixing Global Finance” challenged the assumption that we need credit growth to achieve economic growth. In fact, Turner contends, excessive private-sector debt is one of the principal reasons the crisis was so devastating and the recovery so long. Turner offers a prescription to keep it from happening again: Manage the growth and allocation of credit through public policy, restrict real estate lending and tax debt as a form of “economic pollution.” He also offers a bold challenge to conventional central banking wisdom with a call for debt monetization to be part of the policy tool kit to assure stable growth, and to deal with huge debt overhangs around the world.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Adair Turner

Adair Turner is the former chair of the UK Financial Services Authority, where he played a leading role in revising global banking and shadow banking regulation in response to the financial crisis. He previously served as vice chairman of Merrill Lynch Europe, was director general of the Confederation of British Industry and led McKinsey & Co.’s Eastern Europe and Russia practice. Following his tenure at the FSA, Turner joined the New York-based Institute for New Economic Thinking, where he is a senior fellow and chair of the governing board. Turner has has been a non-executive director of several companies, including Standard Chartered Plc. and Prudential Plc. He is the author of “Just Capital: The Liberal Economy” and “Economics After the Crisis.”  He became a crossbench, or independent, member of the House of Lords in 2005.

 

ABOUT THE MODERATOR

Matt Miller

Matt Miller is a senior vice president at Capital Strategy Research, a unit of Capital Group Inc., where he analyzes U.S. policy trends that affect investment decisions. Before joining Capital in 2015, Miller worked as a columnist for publications including the Washington Post and Fortune magazine, hosted public radio’s “Left, Right & Center” and was a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress. His first book, “The Two Percent Solution: Fixing America's Problems in Ways Liberals and Conservatives Can Love,” was a Los Angeles Times bestseller. His second book, “The Tyranny of Dead Ideas: Revolutionary Thinking for a New Age of Prosperity,” was published in 2009. He was a senior advisor in the White House Office of Management and Budget from 1993 to 1995. He holds a B.A. in economics from Brown University and received a law degree from Columbia Law School.

 

 

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10

November 2015

Building a 21st Century Workforce and Market – What’s the Solution? (KPCC Forum Series)

Santa Monica

Video of “Building a 21st century workforce and market – what’s the solution?” event courtesy of Southern California Public Radio / KPCC. (p) 2015, Southern California Public Radio. Used with permission. All rights reserved.

MI KPCC banner ver2

As California emerges from recession, the state’s unemployment rate, more than 6 percent, continues to track higher than the national rate of 5.1 percent*. Over the past few decades, California’s economic success has increasingly depended on the ability of small business to grow and hire workers. The recession was especially hard on small businesses, and their recovery has been slower than in previous recessions. At the same time, the state has struggled to retain skilled workers and train workers to fill vacancies . These dilemmas stem in part from the high cost of housing, which forces many workers to leave the state, and inadequate opportunities for education and training. How do state leaders reconcile the growing skills gap with key regulatory and structural barriers that are inhibiting our ability to attract, retain and expand businesses?

*The Labor Market Information Division (LMID) is the official source for California Labor Market Information.

Moderated by 

Bergman

Ben Bergman is a senior reporter on the Southern California economy for KPCC. He’s also a frequent contributor to NPR and “Marketplace” and is a regular fill-in host on Southern California Public Radio’s daily two-hour newsmagazine “Take Two.” Bergman has reported extensively on L.A.’s housing affordability problem, the city’s consideration of a higher minimum wage, the NFL’s possible return to the area, and the cable dispute that has kept most of Southern California unable to see games on TV.
@TheBenBergman

With:

Klowden

Kevin Klowden is a managing economist at the Milken Institute and managing director of its California Center, which focuses on economic issues connected to job creation, technology-based development and California's role in the global economy. He is the lead author of multiple key works on the economics of the entertainment industry, including "A Hollywood Exit: What California Must Do to Remain Competitive in Entertainment--and Keep Jobs" as well as "Strategies for Expanding California's Exports" and the "State Technology and Science Index." Klowden has written, spoken and testified about the importance of a skilled and educated workforce in maintaining California's competitiveness. He holds graduate degrees from the University of Chicago and London School of Economics.
@KevinKlowden

Ton Quinlivan2

Van Ton-Quinlivan is vice chancellor of workforce and economic development for California Community Colleges, the nation's largest system of higher education. Appointed by Gov. Jerry Brown in 2011, Ton-Quinlivan's leadership focus is "doing what matters for jobs and the economy." She is a recognized thought leader and agent of change in workforce development. Ton-Quinlivan has spent more than 15 years in corporate leadership roles, most recently as director of workforce development at Pacific Gas & Electric.
@WorkforceVan

Ragsdale

Russell Ragsdale is a Strategic Planning Principal Manager of Grid Modernization in the Electric System Planning department at Southern California Edison. In his current role, he is working to develop strategy for and implement distribution grid modernization. This effort includes enhanced distribution and substation automation, advanced communications networks, IT system architecture and cybersecurity, as well as a suite of planning and operations tools to enable integration of DERs into planning and operations. Ragsdale has over 10 years of experience in distribution system planning, distribution operations engineering, system planning software development, and strategic planning.

Jessica Goodheart

Jessica Goodheart is the director of the RePower LA Project at LAANE. Before assuming leadership of LAANE’s Repower L.A. Project, Goodheart served as the organization’s Research Director, authoring numerous studies, including evaluations of L.A.’s Living Wage Ordinance, analyses of city subsidy programs and reports on local economic development and the L.A. economy. Before joining LAANE in 1997, she managed a U.S. EPA-funded project that evaluated a non-toxic alternative to professional dry cleaning. Goodheart worked as a reporter in the early 1990s, writing stories for the L.A. Times, the LA Reader and the Village View. She received a B.A. in history from Columbia College in 1989 and, in 1995, an M.A. in urban planning from UCLA, where she helped to organize a union for teaching assistants and other academic student employees. She is the author of a forthcoming book of poems entitled Earthquake Season.

 

#AffordableCA , @KPCCforum  , @MilkenInstitute , @CalCommColleges , @LAANE , @SCE

This program was the third in our series, “Rescuing the California Dream: Policies for an Affordable Future.” The series was co-presented by KPCC/Southern California Public Radio and the Milken Institute.

Thousands of Californians face the very real possibility of being priced out of their communities. These public forums will explore the rising cost of education and housing and the dwindling opportunity to reach, or remain within, the middle class. In the first three programs, leaders in government, business, academia, community and philanthropy will dissect the problems and search for solutions to California’s affordability challenge. A fourth installment will be part of the 2015 Milken Institute California Summit and will serve as a platform to provide expert analysis and inform potential policy recommendations.

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