Public Health Summit 2016

Public Health Summit 2016

Program


Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Wed 3/2
6:30 am - 7:00 pm

Registration

Wed 3/2
7:00 am - 8:15 am

Breakfast (by invitation only)

Wed 3/2
8:30 am - 9:25 am

The Promise of Public Health

Civilization's greatest accomplishment may be the doubling of worldwide average life expectancy during the 20th century. After 4 million years of evolution that yielded an increase of only 11 years, in less than a century human life spans were extended by 40 years. That's a major reason real economic output is eight times greater than in the 19th century. Medical research and public health were the primary drivers of that accomplishment--through sanitation, vaccines, reduced infant mortality, food and water security, auto and workplace safety, better nutrition and tobacco reduction, to name a few advances. Will the next century bring a world where cancer, heart disease, hypertension, obesity, malaria, dementia and many other health scourges have been eliminated or controlled? How can we get there, and if we do, can we spread the benefits more equally worldwide? Who is leading the charge? This open-ended discussion will address what changes we can -- and should -- expect in the near and distant future, and what those advances mean for our health and prosperity.

Welcoming Remarks

Mike Klowden

CEO, Milken Institute

Moderator

Richard Besser

Chief Health and Medical Editor, ABC News

Speakers

Nancy Brown

CEO, American Heart Association

Thomas Farley

Commissioner of Health, Philadelphia

Joseph Jimenez

CEO, Novartis

Fred Upton

U.S. Congressman, Michigan; Chairman, Energy and Commerce Committee, House of Representatives

Wed 3/2
9:30 am - 9:50 am

Mike Milken │ Public Health and Prosperity

Milken Institute Chairman Mike Milken welcomed more than 500 public health advocates -- deans of schools of public health, government officials, philanthropists, corporate executives, physicians and scientists -- to the first-ever Milken Institute Public Health Summit by focusing on a half-century of progress in medical research and urging participants to increase collaboration that will result in similar gains in public health through increased length and higher-quality of life and by creating opportunities to drive economic growth.

Welcoming Remarks

Michael Milken

Chairman, Milken Institute

Wed 3/2
9:55 am - 10:10 am

Atul Butte | Driving Public Health: A Trillion Points of Data

Atul Butte -- a renowned physician and researcher in bioinformatics, precision medicine and big data -- discussed remarkable new tools that are accelerating progress in public health. These include the ability to create and mine massive databases that pinpoint risks to highly specific population subsets, and help improve care for millions of patients.

Presenter

Atul Butte

Director, Institute of Computational Health Sciences, and Professor of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco

Wed 3/2
10:20 am - 11:10 am

CEO Roundtable (By invitation only)

Wed 3/2
10:20 am - 11:10 am

Inner-City and Rural Health Care: Bridging the Gap in Access to Services

Inadequate health care is a harsh reality for both the inner-city poor and isolated rural populations. In both cases, lives are shortened or made difficult by unaddressed health problems, including mental illness, substance abuse, heart disease and environmental contamination. Inner-city and rural Americans also share the problem of access to care. Even though 20 percent of Americans live in rural areas, fewer than 10 percent of physicians choose to work in their communities. Large metropolitan areas have some of the best health-care facilities and attract large numbers of medical professionals, but, again, few practice in poor neighborhoods. Overcrowded, badly maintained housing contributes to inner-city health problems by exposing people to dangerous contaminants and creating an environment of stress and violence. Our panelists will discuss these and other disparities in health care and offer practical solutions to address the problems.

Moderator

Dan Diamond

Author, Politico Pulse

Speakers

Jehan El-Bayoumi

Founding Director, Rodham Institute, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, George Washington University

Jewel Mullen

Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

LaQuandra Nesbitt

Director, Department of Health, Washington, D.C.

Raul Pino

Acting Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Public Health

Wed 3/2
10:20 am - 11:10 am

Superbugs: Slowing the Spread of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

Only a few decades ago, before the discovery of antibiotics, a small cut could turn into a life-threatening infection. Now, it is difficult to imagine a world without these "miracle" drugs. But bacteria are evolving to outsmart even the most powerful antibiotics. If you are infected with a drug-resistant strain -- whether you're in a rural area of a developing nation or a world-class hospital -- there is little that doctors can do. Researchers estimate that antimicrobial resistance could kill 300 million people in the next 35 years unless a solution is found. The threat is economic as well. Unchecked, superbugs may stunt global economic output by $50 trillion to $100 trillion over the next 35 years. Can stakeholders from the public and private sectors work together to find concrete solutions? Has the heavy use of antibiotics in farm animals accelerated the growth of drug-resistant bacteria? Our expert panel offers practical advice and insights on the scientific advances aimed at defeating superbugs.

Moderator

Maryn McKenna

Journalist and Author; Specialist in Public Health, Global Health and Food Policy

Speakers

Beth Bell

Director, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC

Barry Eisenstein

Distinguished Physician, Antimicrobials, Merck & Co., Inc.

Lance Price

Director, Antibiotic Resistance Action Center, and Professor, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University

Zachary Rubin

Medical Director, Clinical Epidemiology and Infection Prevention, University of California, Los Angeles

Wed 3/2
10:20 am - 11:10 am

The Economic Impact of Chronic Disease: The Case for Prevention, Early Detection and Better Management

The growing burden of chronic disease is a costly threat to patients, their families and the economy. One in two adult Americans lives with at least one chronic condition such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease or dementia. Further, one in three live with two or more. The medical costs are staggering, but the drag on long-term economic growth and productivity losses associated with absenteeism and "presenteeism" for patients and informal caregivers are many times greater. Many chronic diseases are preventable. How much could we save in treatment costs and economic loss by modifying unhealthy behaviors such as smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and drug abuse? How about the obesity epidemic? How much could we save by simply eating better and exercising more? Can the movement toward a value-based care delivery system--in which payers pay providers based not on procedures--but on health and cost-related outcomes, make a difference?

Moderator

Ross DeVol

Chief Research Officer, Milken Institute

Speakers

Nancy Brown

CEO, American Heart Association

Neal Kaufman

Chief Medical Officer, Canary Health; Adjunct Professor of Medicine and Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles

Kristen Miranda

Senior Vice President, Strategic Partnerships and Innovation, Blue Shield of California

Hugh Waters

Health Economist and Associate Professor, University of North Carolina Schools of Nursing and Public Health

Otis Webb Brawley

Chief Medical and Scientific Officer, Executive Vice President, American Cancer Society

Wed 3/2
11:20 am - 12:10 pm

A Future of Healthy Aging

The last century has seen advances in longevity that would have been unimaginable to prior generations. Longer life span is a remarkable accomplishment, but more must be done to extend health span -- the length of time we enjoy optimal health. From the battle to control chronic disease to the efforts to conquer Alzheimer's, there's much work to do. The stakes could not be higher for individuals, families and countries with aging populations. But hope is on the horizon. Advances in genomics and personalized medicine enable customized care. Awareness about the benefits of nutrition, exercise and purposeful activity is growing. Digital health tools empower individuals, and priorities for reimbursing insurance premiums to health-conscious employees are changing. What can leaders in health, business, philanthropy, policy and other domains do to accelerate change? Our panel of experts will shed light on the landscape and prospects for a future of healthy aging.

Moderator

Paul Irving

Chairman, Center for the Future of Aging, Milken Institute

Speakers

Pinchas Cohen

Dean, Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California

Linda Fried

Dean and DeLamar Professor of Public Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Senior Vice President, Columbia University Medical Center

Freda Lewis-Hall

Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Pfizer Inc.

Robin Mockenhaupt

Chief of Staff, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Wed 3/2
11:20 am - 12:10 pm

Big Data, Small Devices: How Technology Is Advancing Public Health

We constantly hear that technology is improving medicine and medical research through genomics, better medical devices and the advent of precision medicine. We rarely hear about the ways technology is transforming public health. This session will focus on the less-discussed technological revolution taking place in public health and how big data can be mined, analyzed and curated to predict epidemics, improve quality of life and avoid preventable deaths. For example, correlation of health information and demographic data would enable doctors to analyze whether the physical environment contributes to a patient's illness. Does an asthma patient live near a heavily used freeway? Additionally, our panel will explore the potential of ever-growing databases collected from wearable devices and mobile apps that allow problems to be spotted before they occur. Additionally, our panel will explore the potential of ever-growing databases collected from wearable devices and mobile apps that allow problems to be spotted before they occur.

Moderator

Anna Barker

Fellow, FasterCures, a Center of the Milken Institute; Professor and Director, Transformative Healthcare Networks, and Co-Director, Complex Adaptive Systems Network, Arizona State University

Speakers

Helen Burstin

Chief Scientific Officer, National Quality Forum

Atul Butte

Director, Institute of Computational Health Sciences, and Professor of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco

Eric Friedman

Chief Technology Officer and Co-Founder, Fitbit

Kyu Rhee

Chief Health Officer, IBM Corp.

Wed 3/2
11:20 am - 12:10 pm

Waistlines of the World: An Update from the War on Obesity

A third of U.S. adults and one in five children are obese. Not overweight, obese. Compare this with less than 15 percent in 1991. Obesity has become one of the nation's biggest causes of preventable chronic disease. The Milken Institute estimates that if the country could return to those levels from just two decades ago, we'd avoid as much as $1 trillion of direct and indirect costs each year. Philanthropists, companies, universities and government agencies have sought to reverse the steady growth of our waistlines, but the results so far are not encouraging. While pediatric obesity appears to have stabilized, adults continue to get fatter. So how can we fix this? Theories abound. Some say the problem stems from a lack of access to healthy choices and increasingly sedentary lifestyles. Others argue that unclear nutritional advice is the culprit. Still others point to cultural obstacles. This panel will explore what's working, what's not, and where we should focus our efforts.

Moderator

Cristina Alesci

Correspondent, CNN and CNNMoney

Speakers

Patrick Carroll

Group Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Healthcare Clinic, Walgreen Co.

William Dietz

Director of the Sumner M. Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University

Debra Eschmeyer

Executive Director, Let's Move! and Senior Policy Advisor for Nutrition, The White House

Jonathan Fielding

Professor of Health Policy and Management, and Pediatrics, Schools of Public Health and Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles

David Heber

Professor Emeritus of Medicine and Public Health and Founding Director, Center for Human Nutrition, University of California, Los Angeles

Wed 3/2
12:30 pm - 1:50 pm

Lunch Program │ An Update on Zika Virus With CDC Director Tom Frieden

After testifying about the Zika virus emergency on Capitol Hill that morning, Dr. Frieden provided participants at the Public Health Summit with an update on this pressing public health threat.

Welcoming Remarks

Mike Klowden

CEO, Milken Institute

Moderator

Michael Gerson

Senior Advisor, ONE Campaign; Opinion Writer, the Washington Post

Speaker

Tom Frieden

Director, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Wed 3/2
2:00 pm - 2:50 pm

Carrots, Sticks and Nudges: Balancing Public Health and Personal Freedom

Don't drink that, don't eat those, pay this sin tax, lose weight, and don't even think about vaping around here! When public health policies run head-on into Americans' sense of freedom, the results are often very public disagreements about the role of government in encouraging -- or sometimes mandating -- healthy behaviors. Where should we draw the lines? Infectious disease is a matter of public safety, and most people agree that government action is appropriate. But what about obesity or salt consumption, both of which, it can be argued, affect the individual only? When an issue is determined to be within the purview of public health, what tools are available to encourage healthy choices without infringing on personal freedom? What responsibilities do private companies bear for the health of their customers and employees? How do we mitigate the risk that well-meaning policies may create harmful unintended consequences? Experts on different sides of the issue will explore the tradeoffs between advancing the public good and preserving personal choice.

Moderator

Megan McArdle

Columnist, Bloomberg View

Speakers

David Boaz

Executive Vice President, Cato Institute

Bob Casey

U.S. Senator, Pennsylvania; Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Nutrition, Agriculture Committee

LaQuandra Nesbitt

Director, Department of Health, Washington, D.C.

Doug Teitelbaum

Managing Principal, Homewood Capital, LLC

Wed 3/2
2:00 pm - 2:50 pm

The Avoidable $4 Trillion Toll of Global Hypertension

We rarely say someone died from high blood pressure. The direct cause is often heart disease, a stroke or kidney failure. People who get new glasses, take a drug for erectile dysfunction, or complain of memory loss don't usually connect the dots to hypertension. Yet these and other conditions are often a consequence of the elevated blood pressure that affects one in three American adults and an estimated 1 billion people worldwide. The NIH says that suboptimal blood pressure accounts for $1 trillion globally in direct costs over 10 years while indirect costs approach $4 trillion annually. The economic and health burden is especially heavy in developing countries. In fact, hypertension is the only thing that kills more people than cigarettes -- its toll equals all infectious diseases combined. Yet effective treatments that are inexpensive, painless and safe are widely available. Basic screening can be conducted by public health workers, volunteers, pharmacists and nurses, in addition to primary care physicians and patients themselves. This panel of experts will explore why, worldwide, only 13 percent of those with hypertension have their blood pressure controlled and what can be done about it.

Moderator

Lynn Goldman

Michael and Lori Milken Dean, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University

Speakers

Kenneth Connell

Deputy Dean, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of the West Indies

Nieca Goldberg

Medical Director, Joan H. Tisch Center for Women's Health, NYU Langone Medical Center

Stephen Kopecky

Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic; Former President, American Society for Preventive Cardiology

Paul Whelton

Show Chwan Professor of Global Public Health, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University

Wed 3/2
2:00 pm - 2:50 pm

The Health of Nations: Meeting the Sustainable Development Goals

There is an inextricable link between the health of a country and its economic development. From food security to infectious disease and maternal health, major global challenges threaten to stunt the recent GDP growth seen in many emerging and frontier countries. And with more and more investors looking to these markets to provide financial rewards, the risks associated with inaction are daunting. The United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals, which address education, food security, global health, water and the environment, provide a framework for the public and private sectors to collaborate to lift people out of poverty and promote overall wellbeing. But with aggressive targets, what are the best practices to meet the SGDs? How will these massive programs be financed? Innovative solutions are needed. Our panelists will discuss the challenges and opportunities they see as they change the world.

Moderator

Matthew Bishop

Senior Editor, Economist Group

Speakers

David Barash

Chief Medical Officer and Executive Director, Global Health Portfolio, GE Foundation

Stefano Bertozzi

Dean, School of Public Health, and Professor, Health Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley

Deborah Birx

Ambassador-at-Large, U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator and Special Representative for Global Health Diplomacy, State Department

Jacqueline Shea

CEO, Aeras

Wed 3/2
3:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Infectious Diseases: Staying One Step Ahead

Tuberculosis. Hepatitis. HIV/AIDS. Malaria. Polio. Ebola. Zika. We see news about these diseases on a regular basis, and the reports don't always come from a far, far away place. These deadly illnesses often strike very close to home. Worldwide, infectious diseases are one of the leading causes of death in adults, and the statistics are worse for children. Medical advances have helped curtail their spread, but they persist because of poor sanitation, lack of education, inadequate infrastructure and poverty. As we saw with the Ebola outbreak in 2014, an infectious disease can turn into a devastating epidemic very quickly, putting the scientific community in a race against time to treat the victims. This session will feature leaders from the front lines of the fight against well-known diseases and the yet-to-be named next outbreak.

Moderator

Michael Gerson

Senior Advisor, ONE Campaign; Opinion Writer, the Washington Post

Speakers

Michael Kurilla

Director, Office of Biodefense Research Resources and Translational Research, and Associate Director, Biodefense Product Development, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Vanina Laurent-Ledru

Associate Vice President, Vaccination Policy and Advocacy, Sanofi Pasteur

Pranav Shetty

Global Emergency Health Coordinator, International Medical Corps

Moncef Slaoui

Chairman, Vaccines, GSK

Wed 3/2
3:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Leadership Roundtable (By Invitation Only)

Wed 3/2
3:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Mental Health: A Global Challenge We Can't Ignore

For too long, mental illness -- a leading cause of lost economic output -- has been pushed aside in lieu of other public health priorities. However, with the cost of mental disorders poised to surpass that of all other noncommunicable diseases, many foundations and policymakers across the globe have begun devoting more resources and attention to the issue. The United Nations and the World Health Organization have agreed to make prevention and treatment a priority. What is new research telling us about the causes and progression of mental illnesses, and what are the implications for patients and caregivers? What best practices and evidence-based models can we highlight, and what is needed to apply these approaches on a larger scale, particularly in places with limited health-care infrastructure?

Moderator

Margaret Anderson

Executive Director, FasterCures, a Center of the Milken Institute

Speakers

Olga Acosta Price

Associate Professor of Prevention and Community Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University

Pamela Collins

Director, Office for Research on Disparities and Global Mental Health, National Institute of Mental Health

Paolo del Vecchio

Director, Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Charles Ingoglia

Senior Vice President, Public Policy and Practice Improvement, National Council for Behavioral Health

Wed 3/2
3:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Toward a Healthier Workplace: The Business Case for Public Health

U.S. companies spend billions each year on direct health expenses and even more on the indirect costs of an unhealthy workforce -- absenteeism, reduced productivity and disability. As much as three-quarters of those costs stem from chronic diseases, many of which can be avoided or mitigated through lifestyle changes. It's no wonder, then, that forward-looking companies are creating innovative prevention and wellness programs and community initiatives to encourage better health choices. Congress and the administration -- through programs such as the Prevention and Public Health Fund -- are promoting workplace initiatives as part of a broader effort to strengthen public health. This panel will explore how businesses are making small investments today to avoid large expenditures tomorrow.

Moderator

Ryan Shadrick Wilson

Chief Strategy Officer and General Counsel, Partnership for a Healthier America

Speakers

John Agwunobi

Chief Health and Nutrition Officer, Herbalife

Steve Burd

Founder and CEO, Burd Health; Former Chairman and CEO, Safeway Inc.

Jeffrey Levi

Professor of Health Policy, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University

Mark Wagar

President, Heritage Medical Systems

Wed 3/2
4:00 pm - 4:15 pm

Barbara Bush | Resilience in Global Health Leadership

Barbara Bush, CEO and co-founder of Global Health Corps, shared insights on preparing the next generation of health leaders to make health equity a reality across the globe. Bush outlined the mission and framework of Global Health Corps, which organizes fellowships for young professionals to work in poor communities in Africa and the U.S. She also discussed the crucial need for leaders to develop skills such as storytelling and mentorship, as well as traits like empathy and resilience, alongside business acumen and systems thinking.

Presenter

Barbara Bush

CEO and Co-Founder, Global Health Corps

Wed 3/2
4:20 pm - 5:20 pm

Public Health, Medical Research and the Cancer Moonshot: A Collaboration to Change the World

The fight against cancer is moving forward faster than ever thanks to advances in public health and medical research, including more focused prevention strategies, powerful diagnostic tools, vaccines, stem cell treatments, precision therapies and immunology drugs. But for the millions who will be diagnosed this year, and for their families, faster is not fast enough. We can do better. With this in mind, the White House recently announced the National Cancer Moonshot, a $1 billion initiative to eliminate cancer as we know it. The Moonshot represents a bold new opportunity to accelerate our understanding of, and our ability to prevent and treat, all cancers. To be successful, this initiative will require unprecedented partnerships between the public health and medical research communities, and among government agencies, industry, philanthropy, academia, patients and foundations. We'll hear from a diverse panel of leading decision-makers in these fields on how they are committed to relegating cancer to the history books.

Moderator

Michael Milken

Chairman, Milken Institute

Speakers

Francis Collins

Director, National Institutes of Health

Linda Fried

Dean and DeLamar Professor of Public Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Senior Vice President, Columbia University Medical Center

Robert Hugin

Executive Chairman, Celgene

Freda Lewis-Hall

Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Pfizer Inc.

Wed 3/2
5:30 pm - 6:30 pm

Reception

Wed 3/2
6:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Dinner

The first-ever Milken Institute Public Health Summit in Washington concluded with an inspired evening for the more than 500 participants that included deans of schools of public health, government officials, philanthropists, corporate executives, physicians and scientists. Among the highlights, NIH Director Francis Collins, FDA Commisioner Robert Califf and CDC Director Tom Frieden each made remarks and joined on stage together. House of Representatives Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and Congressman Fred Upton, chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee, also joined Milken Institute Chairman Mike Milken in calling for greater collaboration to improve public health worldwide.