Summit on Public Health

Summit on Public Health

Program


Thursday, January 30, 2014

Thu 1/30
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Milken Institute Reception and Dinner

Speakers

Gary Cohen

Executive Vice President, BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company); Chairman, CDC Foundation

Thomas Frieden

Director, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Johnny Isakson

U.S. Senator, Georgia

Michael Klowden

CEO, Milken Institute

Michael Milken

Chairman, Milken Institute

Friday, January 31, 2014

Fri 1/31
7:30 am - 8:45 am

Tours of the CDC Museum

Fri 1/31
8:55 am - 9:10 am

Welcome Remarks

Speakers

Thomas Frieden

Director, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Michael Milken

Chairman, Milken Institute

Fri 1/31
9:10 am - 10:05 am

Global Health Security: Containing Threats Worldwide

Today, a health threat anywhere is a threat everywhere. New microbes emerge and spread quickly with international trade and travel. Drug resistance is increasing, and bioterrorism could strike any nation. In all of these scenarios, CDC is America's front line of defense. This panel will explore how the agency does its crucial work and also feature clips from the movie "Contagion," which tracks the course of a devastating global outbreak through the eyes of CDC disease detectives. While the script is fiction, it reflects very real risks. There were 50-100 million deaths worldwide from the 1918 flu pandemic, and new and rapidly changing strains of flu pose a similar threat today. Yet, a future pandemic could do more than devastate our nation's health. It could also jeopardize the bonds that hold our society together and cause lasting economic damage.

Moderator

Gary Cohen

Executive Vice President, BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company); Chairman, CDC Foundation

Speakers

Larry Brilliant

President and CEO, Skoll Global Threats Fund

Ali Khan

U.S. Assistant Surgeon General (Ret.); Director, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, CDC

Anne Schuchat

U.S. Assistant Surgeon General; Director, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC

Fri 1/31
10:15 am - 11:00 am

Government, Industry and a Healthier Future: A Leadership Forum

This session provides an open forum for members of Congress, senior executives and major philanthropists to discuss the public health issues that affect their constituents, their companies, their causes and the nation's health. Mike Milken and Tom Frieden will lead the discussion.

Speakers

Sanford D. Bishop Jr.

U.S. Representative, Georgia

Vincent Forlenza

Chairman, CEO and President, BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company)

Thomas Frieden

Director, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Robert Hugin

CEO and Chairman, Celgene; Chairman, PhRMA

Jack Kingston

U.S. Representative, Georgia

Michael Milken

Chairman, Milken Institute

Sue Siegel

CEO, healthymagination, GE

Fri 1/31
10:15 am - 11:00 am

The Art of Alignment: Nonprofit Strategies for Improving Public Health

For more than a century, America's universities and charitable foundations have been at the forefront of innovations that increased quality of life and extended longevity. Today more than ever, the nonprofit sector plays a crucial role in improving public health in the nation and around the world. But philanthropies, universities, and public charities vary greatly in their cultures, views, and capacity to effect meaningful change. So how can these disparate organizations coordinate their efforts for the greater good? That's the art of alignment. We'll examine how the most successful philanthropies and universities find common ground to change the world.

Moderator

Charles Stokes

President and CEO, CDC Foundation

Speakers

Anna Barker

Director, Transformative Healthcare Networks, and Co-Director, Complex Adaptive Systems Initiative, Arizona State University

Lynn Goldman

Dean, School of Public Health and Health Services, George Washington University

Larry Jameson

Executive Vice President, University of Pennsylvania for the Health System; Dean, University of Pennsylvania Medical School

John Lange

Senior Fellow, Global Health Diplomacy, United Nations Foundation; Former U.S. Ambassador to Botswana

James Marks

Senior Vice President, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Fri 1/31
11:10 am - 12:05 pm

A Race We Can't Afford to Lose: Outsmarting Superbugs

No one should go to the doctor to get well and instead get a life-threatening infection, but one in every 20 hospitalized patients contracts an infection caused by medical care, resulting in 99,000 deaths and up to $45 billion in excess medical costs each year. Likewise, Americans count on a safe food supply, but CDC estimates that 48 million people get sick and 3,000 die from contaminated food annually with costs up to $77 billion. And antibiotics are miracle drugs that most of us rely on, but bacteria are devising new ways to outsmart them, as in the case of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Breakthroughs in advanced molecular detection (AMD) are rendering these and other challenges imminently more solvable. Not long ago, it took months to sequence - and months more to interpret - a tiny part of a genome. Now, through AMD, a microchip can do all of this in a matter of hours. How do we harness scientific advances to address these national and global health challenges that result from bio-terror, bio-error and newly emerging superbugs?

Moderator

Larry Brilliant

President and CEO, Skoll Global Threats Fund

Speakers

Beth Bell

Director of the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC

Victoria Nahum

Executive Director, Safe Care Campaign

Lance Price

Professor, Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health and Health Services, George Washington University

Andrew von Eschenbach

President, Samaritan Health Initiatives; former Commissioner, U.S. Food and Drug Administration; former Director, National Cancer Institute

Fri 1/31
12:15 pm - 12:30 pm

Lunch Program - Remarks by Charlie Stokes

Speaker

Charles Stokes

President and CEO, CDC Foundation

Fri 1/31
12:50 pm - 2:00 pm

Lunch Program - Public Health Partnerships: Industry, Universities, Philanthropy and Government

The public health ecosystem includes pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, academic medical research centers, major charitable foundations, local and state health departments, the World Health Organization, NGOs, schools of public health, national health agencies around the world and, at its very center, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Not one of these entities can achieve its mission independent of the others. It is a complex and highly effective web of dedicated scientists who stand between all of us and global disaster. The experts on this panel will explore how to make that web even more effective and efficient, so that the past century's remarkable advances in health and longevity continue for future generations.

Moderator

Michael Milken

Chairman, Milken Institute

Introduction By

Charles Stokes

President and CEO, CDC Foundation

Speakers

Thomas Frieden

Director, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Freda Lewis-Hall

Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Pfizer, Inc.

Trevor Mundel

President, Global Health Program, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Carmen Puliafito

Dean, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California

Judith Rodin

President, The Rockefeller Foundation

Fri 1/31
2:10 pm - 3:00 pm

Tales from the Front Lines: How CDC's Elite Disease Detectives Risk Their Lives to Protect Yours

CDC is America's 9-1-1 responder to health security threats. When the call comes in, members of the elite Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) ship out at a moment's notice to wherever they're needed - from Bakersfield to Botswana to Bhutan. Whether applied to an infectious disease, deliberate attack or other emergency, CDC's expertise in preparedness, rapid detection and response saves lives and safeguards the world. Indeed, the agency's most important achievements are the outbreaks that didn't happen and the diseases that were stopped before they crossed our borders. Those lives protected often can't be counted, and they don't make the news. Nor do the stories of the brave men and women who carry out that work. You'll hear them today.

Moderator

Michael Bell

Deputy Director, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, CDC

Speakers

Robyn Neblett Fanfair

Epidemiologist, CDC

Andrea McCollum

Epidemiologist, CDC

Jennifer McQuiston

Veterinary Medical Officer, CDC

Tyler Sharp

Epidemiologist, CDC

Rachel Smith

Medical Epidemiologist, CDC

Fri 1/31
2:10 pm - 3:00 pm

The Economic Burden of Chronic Disease: Preventing the Preventable

Most analyses of chronic illness focus on direct medical expenses, but that approach shows only a small part of the picture. Missing are the drag on long-term economic growth and the impact on productivity (largely through absenteeism and "presenteeism," in which employees show up but underperform). In 2007, the Milken Institute took a comprehensive view in "An Unhealthy America," which forecast the economic benefits the nation could reap by "containing the containable" costs of seven common chronic diseases. By midcentury, the report estimated, the U.S. economy could be $5.7 trillion smaller if we don't change course. In conjunction with this Summit, the Institute re-ran the numbers to determine whether we're making progress. Chief Research Officer Ross DeVol joins a panel focused on strategies that communities, businesses and nonprofits are implementing to create a healthier America.

Moderator

Margaret Anderson

Executive Director, FasterCures

Speakers

Steve Burd

CEO, Burd and Company; Former Chairman and CEO, Safeway Inc.

Ross DeVol

Chief Research Officer, Milken Institute

David Heber

Professor and Director, UCLA Center for Human Nutrition

Kenneth Thorpe

Chairman, Emory Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease; Professor and Chair, Department of Health Policy and Management, Emory University

Fri 1/31
3:10 pm - 3:55 pm

The Business Case for Public Health

The doubling of life expectancy globally during the 20th century is perhaps the greatest achievement of our civilization. Improved health has reduced suffering immeasurably, and it accounts for an estimated half of all economic growth since 1900. Public health programs to ensure clean water and food, minimize the impact of pandemics and improve vehicle safety have played vital roles. Corporate wellness programs have also resulted in a healthier, more productive workforce that uses less sick leave and is more likely to stay employed. Companies and other organizations that have implemented effective wellness programs have collectively saved billions of dollars in health expenses while reducing costs of recruitment and training. Just returning the American population to its average weight of two decades ago could save at least $1 trillion a year. This panel will discuss what has worked and why.

Moderator

Michael Milken

Chairman, Milken Institute

Speakers

Steve Burd

CEO, Burd and Company; Former Chairman and CEO, Safeway Inc.

Robert Hugin

CEO and Chairman, Celgene; Chairman, PhRMA

Rajiv Kaul

Portfolio Manager, Select Biotechnology Portfolio and Advisor Biotechnology Fund, Fidelity Investments

Mehmood Khan

Executive Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer, Global Research and Development, PepsiCo

Judith Monroe

Director, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support, CDC

Fri 1/31
3:55 pm - 4:10 pm

Closing Remarks

Speakers

Thomas Frieden

Director, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Michael Milken

Chairman, Milken Institute

Fri 1/31
4:15 pm - 5:00 pm

Closing Reception with Tom Frieden and Mike Milken

Fri 1/31
4:15 pm - 5:00 pm

Tours of CDC's Emergency Operations Center