Saturday, April 25, 2015
5:30 pm - 10:00 pm
To learn more, please visit www.globalgourmetgames.org
Sunday, April 26, 2015
8:30 am - 11:30 am
The Family Program is a place for leading families from diverse backgrounds to discuss some of the most important issues facing them today -- from family dynamics and creating a meaningful legacy to intergenerational succession planning and raising children amid great affluence. This interactive discussion offers a select group of influential individuals, families and philanthropists firsthand information in an off-the-record, roundtable setting.
Speakers
David Arison, Board Member, Arison Investments and the Ted Arison Family Foundation; Vice President of Global Business Relations, Miya
Richard Ditizio, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Milken Institute
Niall Ferguson, Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History, Harvard University; Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University
Sir Tom Hunter, Founder, Hunter Foundation; Founding Partner, West Coast Capital
Strive Masiyiwa, Founder and Chairman, Econet Wireless
Tsitsi Masiyiwa, Executive Chairperson, Higher Life Foundation
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
12:00 pm - 4:00 pm

12:00 pm - 4:00 pm
This off-the-record program offers investors a rare chance to hear from some of the world's most influential leaders and to gather their candid, nuanced views about how global macroeconomic trends are unfolding.
Speakers
Bob Collymore, CEO, Safaricom Ltd.
Richard Ditizio, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Milken Institute
Robert Hugin, Chairman and CEO, Celgene
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Michael Mullen, Senior Advisor, Providence Equity; Former Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
Mindy Silverstein, Managing Director, Milken Institute
John S. Watson, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Chevron Corporation
3:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Registration for the 2015 Global Conference will be available at the following locations:

-Beverly Hilton (lobby)
-Beverly Wilshire
-Century Plaza Hotel
-Montage Hotel

5:00 pm - 7:00 pm

7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Monday, April 27, 2015
6:00 am - 8:30 am

6:00 am - 7:00 pm
Registration for the 2015 Global Conference will be available at the following locations:

-Beverly Hilton (lobby)
-Beverly Wilshire
-Century Plaza Hotel
-Montage Hotel

7:00 am - 8:00 am

7:30 am - 9:00 am
This private, off-the-record session will convene senior government officials, representatives of leading corporations and investors to discuss topics, trends and strategies related to increasing investment in developing markets.
Moderator
Mindy Silverstein, Managing Director, Milken Institute
Speakers
Tony Blair, Former Prime Minister, Great Britain and Northern Ireland
H.E. Paul Kagame , President, Republic of Rwanda
Seth Merrin, Founder and CEO, Liquidnet Holdings, Inc.
Gregory Page, Executive Chairman, Cargill
Hilton Romanski, Senior Vice President, Head of Corporate Development, Cisco Systems
Juan Sartori, Founder and Executive Chairman, Union Group
8:00 am - 9:15 am
For all their many differences, Washington pundits and politicians frequently find common ground in the search for better therapies for our most devastating diseases. A rare bright spot of comity and bipartisanship, this shared interest in maintaining U.S. leadership in medical innovation presents several opportunities in 2015. From the 21st Century Cures legislation in Congress to the president's Precision Medicine Initiative to the FDA's next round of user fee negotiations, legislative and regulatory calendars are filling up with chances to advance science and help patients. Will 2015 bring the policy fixes needed to lower drug costs and increase patient input in the healthcare system? What can patients expect from Washington in the months ahead?
Moderator
Margaret Anderson, Executive Director, FasterCures, a Center of the Milken Institute
Speakers
Joe Barton, U.S. Congressman, Texas
Francis Collins, Director, National Institutes of Health
Robert Hugin, Chairman and CEO, Celgene
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Sara Radcliffe, President and CEO, California Life Sciences Association
8:00 am - 9:15 am
The Republicans are in control of Congress and the 2016 Presidential Election is just around the corner. What are the politics of the possible as both parties address the issues facing the American people? What factors will shape the presidential race? This panel of political experts will address the impact on public policy of the new 114th Congress and candidly assess the 2016 road to the White House.
Moderator
Mike Allen, Chief White House Correspondent, Politico
Speakers
Evan Bayh, Senior Advisor, Apollo Global Management; Partner, McGuireWoods LLC; Former U.S. Senator, Indiana
Ed Gillespie, Senior Counselor, Brunswick Group; Former Counselor to President George W. Bush
Jason Grumet, Founder and President, Bipartisan Policy Center; Author, “City of Rivals: Restoring the Glorious Mess of American Democracy”
Van Jones, President, Dream Corps Unlimited, CNN Political Contributor
Frank Luntz, Founder and President, Luntz Global
8:00 am - 9:15 am
Optimism about global markets was mixed as 2014 closed with plunging oil prices, growing geopolitical risk and sluggish growth in Asia and Europe. The uncertainty isn't limited to Europe and Asia, though. In the U.S., speculation about higher interest rates is creating volatility in U.S. and emerging markets. With many countries still bogged down by the legacies of the recession, including excessive debt and high unemployment, can world leaders find a common strategy for expanding growth? And amid the turbulence, how should investors position themselves to take advantage of returning volatility? To open the Global Conference, some of the world's leading minds in finance will consider these questions and share their thoughts about what's in store for the world's capital markets.
Moderator
Gillian Tett, U.S. Managing Editor and Columnist, Financial Times
Speakers
Alexander Friedman, Group CEO, GAM
Joshua Friedman, Co-Founder, Co-Chairman and Co-CEO, Canyon Partners, LLC
Joshua Harris, Co-Founder and Member, Board of Directors, Apollo Global Management
Alan Howard, Co-Founder and Partner, Brevan Howard
Carey Lathrop, Managing Director and Head of Global Credit Markets, Citi
9:30 am - 10:30 am

Moderator
Paul Stefanick, Head of Global Investment Banking Coverage & Advisory, Co-Head of Americas Corporate Finance, Deutsche Bank
Speaker
Mohamed El-Erian, Chief Economic Advisor, Allianz; Chair, President’s Global Development Council
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Working from the policy recommendations identified at the 2014 Milken Institute California Summit, the California Center will convene a panel of key business and government leaders to address California's future. Through frank and open discussion, the Institute's California Center is focused on developing actionable strategies to create new economic development prospects, with a focus on trade and manufacturing. This session will examine how, through a strong partnership of key leaders, we can find solutions for economic growth and job creation through infrastructure development and a strong aerospace industry while reinforcing a vibrant manufacturing presence.
9:30 am - 10:30 am
The U.S. economy continues to recover, creating jobs and enjoying sustained, if yet not sizzling, growth. Still, policy concerns remain. In the near term, they revolve around strengthening the recovery and ensuring that the gains are shared, and over a longer horizon, tackling the U.S. budget imbalance. Addressing these challenges requires policies that will enhance American competitiveness and support stronger productivity growth and rising incomes for all Americans. The administration has proposed a range of initiatives, including investments in infrastructure, education and additional support for scientific research, while working to open key export markets for American firms. This panel of government and business leaders will focus on policies to address our nation's challenges, both near-term and long-term, in a way that reflects our priorities.
Moderator
Ben White, Chief Economic Correspondent and Columnist, Politico
Speakers
Shaun Donovan, Director, White House Office of Management and Budget
Alan Schwartz, Executive Chairman, Guggenheim Partners
Mark Weinberger , Global Chairman and CEO, EY
9:30 am - 10:30 am

Speakers
Leon Black, Chairman and CEO, Apollo Global Management
Tilman Fertitta, Chairman and CEO, Fertitta Entertainment Inc.
Robert Hugin, Chairman and CEO, Celgene
Federica Marchionni, CEO, Lands’ End
Steven Mnuchin, Chairman and CEO, Dune Capital Management LP; Chairman and CEO, OneWest Bank Group LLC
David Palmer, President and CEO, Diamond Resorts International
Robert Silberman, Executive Chairman, Strayer Education, Inc.
Tom Wyatt, CEO, Knowledge Universe U.S.
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Risk and uncertainty have grown over the past year as economic growth slowed and old conflicts spilled into new territories. The war against extremists expanded with terrorist attacks in Europe and Australia and the overthrow of Yemen's West-leaning government. ISIS, meanwhile, expanded into Libya while continuing its reign of terror over swaths of Iraq and Syria. To complicate matters further, the U.S. and Israel can't agree on a strategy to deter Iran's nuclear ambitions. Russia's relationship with the West has worsened as the U.S. and its European allies try to counter Moscow's support for Ukrainian rebels. The risks aren't limited to security concerns. Slower economic growth in Europe, China, Russia and Brazil is rippling through smaller, developing nations. And nations have yet to agree on a unified response to climate change. How we respond to these challenges will shape the future. Listen as a panel of experts considers which pose the greatest risk and what leaders can do to contain them.
Moderator
Michael Crowley, Senior Foreign Affairs Correspondent, Politico
Speakers
Tony Blair, Former Prime Minister, Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Wesley Clark, Chairman and CEO, Wesley K. Clark & Associates; Army General (Ret.) and Former Supreme Allied Commander, NATO
Lindsey Graham, U.S. Senator, South Carolina
Yasuhide Nakayama, State Minister for Foreign Affairs, Japan
9:30 am - 10:30 am
As some central banks, including the Federal Reserve, contemplate normalization of monetary policy, they are turning to macroprudential policy to manage future systemic risk in financial markets. Janet Yellen and Mario Draghi, among others, have said they are pinning their hopes for managing stability in the context of Basel III on macroprudentialism, an approach that addresses potential risks to the financial system as a whole. Despite central banks' clear intention that this policy will play a significant role in developed economies, few policymakers or financial players know what macroprudential policy is, much less how to assess its efficacy or necessity. This private session will be a unique opportunity for participants to gain a better understanding of these tools, how they work and their implications for broader monetary policy. Participants will also be able to interact in a discussion on how specific aspects of future regulations might impact their business decisions.
Moderator
Claude Lopez, Managing Economist and Director of Research, Milken Institute
9:30 am - 10:30 am
As 2015 began, the United States had become a premier global oil producer, bringing the ideal of energy independence closer to reality. Its huge output, however -- aided by new extraction methods -- has contributed to a hard slide in prices and jolted the geopolitics of energy. OPEC leader Saudi Arabia hasn't cut production, aiming to maintain its market share. Indeed, these conditions are forcing drillers to cancel projects in the U.S. and elsewhere. Is there a realistic scenario for returning to $100-plus per barrel? Would it require a renewal of vibrant growth in emerging markets? Questions are also multiplying around natural gas, whose price is similarly depressed. Is it still considered a bridge fuel between coal and renewables? Will Russia's gas exports influence Europe's actions in the dispute over Ukraine? Solar and wind are getting cheaper as they follow the technology cost curve. Is that enough to put them in homes and power stations around the world, or are fossil fuels too entrenched? The experts and executives on this panel will keep us at the forefront of this crucial, rapidly changing field.
Moderator
Gregory Zuckerman, Special Writer, Wall Street Journal; Author, "The Frackers"
Speakers
Pierre Breber, Corporate Vice President and President, Gas and Midstream, Chevron
Karen Harbert, President and CEO, Institute for 21st Century Energy, U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Joshua Harris, Co-Founder and Member, Board of Directors, Apollo Global Management
John Raymond, Managing Partner and CEO, Energy & Minerals Group
9:30 am - 10:30 am
How will housing finance evolve amid regulatory change and the challenges of achieving large-scale reform legislation? Incremental changes are taking place, with risk transfer transactions by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac bringing some private capital back into housing finance, while new capital requirements for Private Mortgage Insurers (PMI) further protect taxpayers. Still, a revival of private label securitization for mortgages not guaranteed by taxpayers remains a work in progress. At the same time, policymakers have focused on expanding access to credit through approaches that include a return to mortgages with low down payments and reducing insurance premiums at FHA and possibly the GSEs. The housing finance system is thus evolving even while Fannie and Freddie remain linchpins of the system and increasingly consolidated as government-controlled entities. This panel will assess the current state of the housing finance system and the impact of evolutionary changes under way on the housing industry, home buyers, and taxpayers.
Moderator
Ed DeMarco, Senior Fellow in Residence, Milken Institute; Former Acting Director, Federal Housing Finance Agency
Speakers
John Bartling, President and CEO, Invitation Homes
John Delaney, U.S. Congressman, Maryland
Nagendra Jayanty, Managing Director, Claren Road Asset Management, Carlyle Group
Rick Lazio, Partner, Jones Walker LLP; Former U.S. Congressman, New York
Phillip Swagel, Senior Fellow, Milken Institute; Professor, University of Maryland School of Public Policy
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Prospects for economic growth in the Middle East are challenged by a vast and growing population of unemployed youth. A few numbers help tell the story. Young people between the ages of 15 and 24 account for 40 percent of the population in a region that has the world's highest youth unemployment rate. Historically, young people depended on the government to provide public-sector jobs, but that path has been disrupted by conflict and declining oil revenue. The need for a private-sector alternative is clear, but serious obstacles loom. Too many young people are ill-prepared for the business world and investors are deterred by corruption and instability. Change will require state-based economies, many dependent on oil exports, to embrace private enterprise. But can entrepreneurship thrive in this part of the world? Can schools be changed to emphasize business and technical skills? And are leaders strong enough to enact the necessary reforms? This panel will discuss the challenges and consider ways to foster economic growth.
Moderator
Christopher Schroeder, Technology Entrepreneur and Investor; Author, "Startup Rising: The Entrepreneurial Revolution Remaking the Middle East"
Speakers
Wael Amin, Partner, Sawari Ventures; Chairman, ITWorx
Hala Fadel, Partner, Leap Ventures; Chair, MIT Enterprise Forum of the Pan Arab Region
Elizabeth Richard, Deputy Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of State
Samer Salty, Founder and CEO, Zouk Capital
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Business, government and research communities agree on the benefits of high-quality early learning experiences for young children. But public policymakers and private providers have struggled for consensus on how early childhood education programs should best be implemented and administered to meet the needs of working families in an affordable fashion. President Obama has further raised the stakes in this discussion with his call for substantial investment increases in early childhood education. This panel will examine the case for quality early childhood education from research, business and governmental perspectives and discuss options for creating policies and programs that allow all Americans to reach their full potential.
Moderator
Elanna Yalow, CEO, Early Learning Programs, Knowledge Universe
Speakers
John Engler, President, Business Roundtable; Former Governor, Michigan
J.B. Pritzker, Managing Partner and Founder, Pritzker Group
Linda Smith, Deputy Assistant Secretary and Inter-Departmental Liaison for Early-Childhood Development, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
John Woodward, CEO and Founder, Busy Bees
9:30 am - 10:30 am
What is the secret to building a great hedge fund? In this highly concentrated industry, 90 percent of assets under management are controlled by only 11 percent of the funds. With so much money going to so few, this market is one of the toughest for new managers to scale. Performance obviously matters, but veteran managers would argue that people make up the secret sauce that brings great performance and client trust. Our panel will discuss how a manager can pick the right strategies and people necessary to build a world-class investment team. Among the questions they will consider: Is a key-man fund better than the multi-manager model? Which do institutional clients prefer and which is easier to scale? And how to you attract the best analysts and portfolio managers? When the fund is down, what keeps investors in the game?
Moderator
Ilana Weinstein, Founder and CEO, The IDW Group, LLC
Speakers
Gideon Berger, Senior Managing Director, Blackstone
Kenneth Griffin, Founder and CEO, Citadel
Jason Karp, Chief investment Officer and CEO, Tourbillon Capital Partners, L.P.
Alexander Klabin, Managing Partner and Co-Chief Investment Officer, Senator Investment Group LP
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Emerging market infrastructure could be attractive to many investors but often carries risk that precludes their participation. Shared-use infrastructure is a model that mitigates that risk and delivers development impact. Rails, ports and roads tied to oil, mining and gas projects generate reliable cash flows through usage tariffs paid by creditworthy global companies. The economies of scale and development impact of these infrastructure assets is multiplied when they are available to multiple users. Participants will gain insight on an emerging set of shared-use infrastructure opportunities and provide input that will shape them.
Moderators
Glen Ireland, Founding Partner, InfraShare Partners
Staci Warden, Executive Director, Center for Financial Markets, Milken Institute
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Over the next 30 years, the planet's urban population is expected to expand by 2 billion. New megacities will join the Shanghais, Cairos and Tokyos of the world. Who will build them and improve them, ensuring that they become centers of industry, innovation, sustainability and well-being? In many countries, the public sector maps out city growth, as the Chinese government did, for example, in the development of Shenzhen. But how can the private sector shape the urban blueprint for the coming boom? What new perspectives can investors bring to the conversation? There are sure to be immense opportunities in diverse sectors: infrastructure, transportation, real estate development, clean technology, education, food security, public health and more. Our panel will discuss how the private sector can make cities of the future productive, livable and economically viable.
Moderator
Taimur Hyat, Chief Strategy Officer, Prudential Investment Management
Speakers
Michael Berkowitz, President, 100 Resilient Cities Centennial Challenge
Charles Garner, Principal, Investments, CIM Group
Bridget Rosewell, Founder and Senior Advisor, Volterra Partners; Former Chief Economic Advisor, Greater London Authority
9:30 am - 10:30 am
With moderate growth and interest rates still low, there have been few pockets of opportunity for distressed-debt investors in the U.S. That may change if the Federal Reserve raises interest rates later this year and maturity walls need to be refinanced. In the meantime, investors have been flocking to Europe, where bank deleveraging has created opportunities in corporate credit and real estate. On this panel, some of the leaders in distressed-debt investing will share their strategies about uncovering value in today's competitive markets. Will the expected rise in interest rates force an uptick in corporate defaults, or is the specter of deflation a greater threat? Which sectors are the most attractive in the current market? Which industries present the best opportunities and which should investors avoid?
Moderator
Richard Cantor, Chief Risk Officer, Moody's Corporation; Chief Credit Officer, Moody's Investors Service
Speakers
Laurence Gottlieb, Chairman, CEO and Co-Founder, Fundamental Advisors LP
Christopher Pucillo, CEO and Chief Investment Officer, Solus Alternative Asset Management
Brian Reynolds , Founder and Managing Partner, Chatham Capital
Steven Shapiro, Founding Partner and Senior Portfolio Manager, GoldenTree Asset Management LP
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer and hypertension levy extraordinary costs on families as well as local and national economies. And the price tag may increase as an aging population and a projected rise in obesity take a toll on people's health. Yet the evidence is strong that simple changes in behavior, like getting more exercise, smarter eating and regular checkups, will reduce the incidence of these ailments and cut health care costs. Healthy workers also contribute more to the economy through increased productivity. The goal is clear, but how can we make the necessary changes? Is it a matter of personal responsibility or a public health issue? Is the government's role persuasion or enforcement? Companies can also play a vital role in creating a healthier work force. This panel will address the issues and opportunities associated with investing in wellness and changing our behavior to bolster health.
Moderator
Erik Schatzker, Anchor and Editor-at-Large, Bloomberg Television
Speakers
Steve Burd, Founder and CEO, Burd Health; Former Chairman and CEO, Safeway Inc.
Lynn Goldman, Michael and Lori Milken Dean of Public Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University
Kyu Rhee, Chief Health Officer and Vice President, IBM Corp.
Bernard J. Tyson, Chairman and CEO, Kaiser Permanente
9:30 am - 10:30 am
The last two presidential election cycles saw the enthusiastic engagement of women, minorities and younger voters. For the first time, there are 100 women in Congress. How do we build on that momentum? How can we encourage more women to lead in every aspect of the political process, from fundraising and running for office to holding elected officials accountable on issues that matter to them? And how can we work more effectively with the private sector to achieve this goal? This panel will explore ways to engage women in politics across the social, economic and minority spectrum and discuss why doing so is critical to the nation's future.
Moderator
Krystal Ball, Co-host, "The Cycle," MSNBC
Speakers
Laura Cox Kaplan, Principal-in-Charge, Government, Regulatory Affairs and Public Policy, PricewaterhouseCoopers
Tulsi Gabbard, U.S. Congresswoman, Hawaii
Lauren Leader-Chivee, Co-Founder and CEO, All in Together
Mimi Walters, U.S. Congresswoman, California
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Banks have traditionally been the primary source of funding for small businesses, but post-crisis regulation and alternative sources of investment may be changing how small businesses access outside capital. Are banks retaining their primary position and to what extent are small and middle-market companies embracing the alternatives to traditional banks and venture capital firms? The Milken Institute and the National Center for the Middle Market asked these questions of small and middle-market businesses and will present their findings in an interactive roundtable. Please come join us for the discussion
Moderators
Brian Knight, Associate Director, Center for Financial Markets, Milken Institute
Thomas Stewart, Executive Director, National Center for the Middle Market
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Norman Lear pushed the boundaries of television and broadened our understanding of family and society with comedies like All in the Family, Maude, Good Times and The Jeffersons. Lear, creator, writer, producer and progressive political activist, will discuss the highs and the lows that have contributed to his to his life - so far - and the unexpected and life-affirming relationship he developed with Prophet Walker, who at 16 was sentenced to prison as an adult. Walker's path to reform led him to an engineering degree and community activism. Two storytellers from opposite sides of town will share their individual and interconnected lives.
Moderator
Alex Witt, Anchor, MSNBC's "Weekends with Alex Witt"; Correspondent, NBC News
Speakers
Norman Lear, Chairman, Act III Communications; Founder, People for the American Way
Prophet Walker, CEO, PWC Development; Board Member, InsideOUT Writers
10:45 am - 11:45 am
With Washington in gridlock, many states have been forced to rely on their own resources to meet the challenges of globalization, technological change and demographic shifts. As a result, state governments are taking a leading role in the 21st century economy, forging innovative solutions such as public-private partnerships designed to stimulate growth, improve education, fix infrastructure and put people into high-skill jobs. More challenges lie ahead. The technological revolution is reshaping how business and commerce are conducted. How can states embrace the economic opportunity that it poses? What role will universities play in supporting scientific breakthroughs and preparing workers to meet the challenges of the next decade? Join us for this forward-looking conversation with four governors and a leading political journalist as they discuss the role states are taking on.
Moderator
Ronald Brownstein, Editorial Director, Atlantic Media
Speakers
John Hickenlooper, Governor, Colorado
Terry McAuliffe, Governor, Virginia
Pat McCrory, Governor, North Carolina
Pete Ricketts, Governor, Nebraska
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Accelerating technological change and stricter regulation are reshaping the financial services industry. New entrants to the market are disrupting the way services are delivered, but what are the opportunities and risks, and do the benefits outweigh the costs? Universal banks seem to be giving way to more specialized platforms, leading some to question whether regulation can keep pace with the speed with which technology evolves. What new regulatory architectures are needed to address the rapidly growing role of technology? This panel will feature representatives of leading financial institutions sharing their views about the future of finance.
Moderator
Felix Salmon, Senior Editor, Fusion
Speakers
Richard Daly, President and CEO, Broadridge Financial Solutions
Adena Friedman , President, Nasdaq
David Siegel, Co-Chairman, Two Sigma
Michael Weil, CEO, RCS Capital
Darryl White, CEO, BMO Capital Markets
10:45 am - 11:45 am

Interviewer
Staci Warden, Executive Director, Center for Financial Markets, Milken Institute
Speaker
David Bronner, CEO, Retirement Systems of Alabama
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Longer life means more time for family, friends and leisure, but the opportunities to make a difference in the world are bigger than that. For those fortunate to have the talent, perspective and the commitment to seize the day and act, longer life means the possibility to reinvent and re-imagine life, find new purpose and engage and contribute in fresh ways. What will you do to take advantage of your experience and talents? What will you do to improve lives and create a better future? What examples will you set for your children? Will your older years be as important, or more important, than your younger years? Will you find satisfaction and new meaning as you age? Our panelists will discuss their own paths and the possibilities for every Global Conference attendee.
Moderator
Laura Carstensen, Professor of Psychology and Fairleigh S. Dickinson Jr. Professor in Public Policy, Stanford University; Director, Stanford Center on Longevity
Speakers
Michael Eisner, Founder and CEO, The Tornante Co.; Former Chairman and CEO, the Walt Disney Co.
Marc Freedman, Founder and CEO, Encore.org
Paul Irving, Chairman, Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging; Distinguished Scholar in Residence, University of Southern California Davis School of Gerontology
Jo Ann Jenkins, CEO, AARP
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Mobile, big data, the Internet of Things and social media are leading a revolution that is transforming opportunities in health care and research. Extraordinary advancements in mobile technology and connectivity have provided the foundation needed to dramatically change the way health care is practiced today and research is done tomorrow. While we are still in the early innings of using mobile technology in the delivery of health care, evidence supporting its potential to impact the delivery of better health care, lower costs and improve patient outcomes is apparent. Mobile technology for health care, or mHealth, can empower doctors to more effectively engage their patients and provide secure information on demand, anytime and anywhere. Patients demand safety, speed and security from their providers. What are the technologies that are allowing this transformation to take place?
Moderator
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Speakers
Anna Barker, Fellow, FasterCures, a Center of the Milken Institute; Professor and Director, Transformative Healthcare Networks, and Co-Director, Complex Adaptive Systems Network, Arizona State University
Atul Butte, Director, Institute of Computational Health Sciences, University of California, San Francisco
John Chen, Executive Chairman and CEO, BlackBerry
Victor Dzau, President, Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences; Chancellor Emeritus, Duke University
Patrick Soon-Shiong, Chairman and CEO, NantWorks, LLC
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Too many investors associate "impact investing" with high risks and below-market returns. Often, that is because they don't realize the scope of investments that fall within the category. A smart investor can make the world a better place and still enjoy a healthy profit. For example, renewable-energy projects and sovereign issuances for developing countries that need funds for infrastructure development are financially sound yet socially responsible investments. Using environmental, social or governance screens, investors can practice impact investing without sacrificing returns or absorbing any more significant a risk than a mainstream investment. And in some cases, impact investing involves asset classes that are less vulnerable to general market risks. So are you an impact investor? Hear from panelists about their experiences with impact investing and how to move past the stereotype to reveal tangible investment opportunities.
Moderator
Caitlin MacLean, Director, Innovative Finance, Milken Institute
Speakers
Janet Cowell, Treasurer, North Carolina
Sharon Hendricks, Vice Chair, CalSTRS Board; Professor, Communication Studies, Los Angeles City College
William Lee, Chief Investment Officer and Vice President, Foundation and Pension Investments, Kaiser Permanente
Shawn Wischmeier, Chief Investment Officer, Margaret A. Cargill Philanthropies
10:45 am - 11:45 am
This unique, off-the-record conversation will bring together senior Republican and Democratic staff to provide a frank view of the agenda and areas where bipartisan agreement might be forged. Topics that will likely be discussed include: transportation and infrastructure, tax reform, international trade, the debt ceiling, entitlement reform, appropriations and healthcare legislation.
10:45 am - 11:45 am
This year, Europe has been shaken out of an unsatisfying stasis by heightened fears of deflation, vigorous central bank action, terrorism in France and political transformation in Greece. The continent's political economy is getting more complicated, and boundaries are being tested. Many wonder how far the ECB's quantitative easing program will go and whether it can prevent the evils of joblessness and deflation from worsening. Investors have fled the euro, and parity with the dollar is in sight. What's the likely outcome for asset values in such a scenario? European politics reflects an unsettled landscape as well, with traditional parties failing to deliver solutions in many cases and polarization increasing. Will debates over immigration lead to policies everyone can live with? Is the monetary union resilient enough to withstand new challenges? Can this crucial player in the global economy effectively redesign its blueprint for growth?
Moderator
Francesco Guerrera, Financial Editor, the Wall Street Journal
Speakers
Peter Beyer, Member, German Bundestag
Claire Cockerton, CEO, Innovate Finance; Chairwoman, Entiq
Mohamed El-Erian, Chief Economic Advisor, Allianz; Chair, President’s Global Development Council
James McCormack, Managing Director and Global Head of Sovereign and Supranational Ratings, Fitch
Howard Shore, Executive Chairman, Shore Capital
10:45 am - 11:45 am
The traditional means of paying for infrastructure seem to be fading into the rearview mirror. Alternative-fuel vehicles don't contribute to the U.S. Highway Trust Fund, which is chronically short of cash. Roads and bridges, ports and railways are getting busier, but funding is getting harder to find. America's electric grid is aging, its sewers and water systems are leaking and many public buildings are poorly maintained. States face extensive infrastructure investment backlogs at a time of heated battles over public spending, and strapped local communities often find the capital markets difficult to navigate. This session will examine how to smartly channel funds to current and future infrastructure needs. What are the best models developed in the U.S. or elsewhere, and what must both public officials and investors know and do to implement practical solutions? How can the public sector attract private capital to this agenda? When does it make sense to tap the capital markets directly?
Moderator
Dale Bonner, Senior Advisor, Milken Institute; Executive Chairman, Plenary Concessions
Speakers
John Delaney, U.S. Congressman, Maryland
Charles Harrington, Chairman, CEO and President, Parsons Corp.
James Pass, Senior Managing Director, Municipal Sector Manager and Portfolio Manager, Guggenheim Partners
10:45 am - 11:45 am
As investors show renewed interest in Asia, old concerns about political and economic risks are resurfacing. Although large parts of the region are under dynamic new management, old animosities appear to threaten Asia's rise. Exactly what are the inherent risks in Asia, and what do they mean for investors? This panel will provide expert insights into the economic and political reforms by the military governments in Thailand and Myanmar, the trials faced by Indonesia's new president, and an assessment of Abenomics in Japan and Xi Jinping's politically conservative, but economically liberal, approach to governing China.
Moderator
Gwen Robinson, Senior Asia Editor, Nikkei Asian Review; Senior Fellow, Institute of Security and International Studies, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand
Speakers
Brian Baker, CEO and Director, Head of Asia ex-Japan, PIMCO Asia Ltd.
Curtis S. Chin, Asia Fellow, Milken Institute; Trustee, World Education Services; Former U.S. Ambassador to the Asian Development Bank
Seki Obata, Associate Professor, Keio Business School, Graduate School of Business Administration, Keio University
Walter Wang, President and CEO, JM Eagle Inc.
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Our fast-changing world gives CEOs a lot to lose sleep over. Today, it's not enough to simply make a good product. Globalization has lengthened supply chains and shapes hiring decisions. The BRIC economies are slowing down, cyber threats are growing and customers are less loyal. These challenges notwithstanding, there is reason for optimism in the corporate suite. Stocks and growth forecasts are up in the U.S., new markets are opening in emerging economies and, in spite of the risks they bring, new technologies have the power to transform companies and society for the better. What are the keys to success for today's CEOs? How can they keep up, and what are the strategies that will enable them to keep their companies focused, innovative and growing?
Moderator
Josh Tyrangiel, Chief Content Officer, Bloomberg Media; Editor, Bloomberg Businessweek
Speakers
Alexandra Lebenthal, President and CEO, Lebenthal Holdings, LLC
Aaron Levie, CEO, Box
Greg Maffei, President and CEO, Liberty Media Corporation
Jim Moffatt, Chairman and CEO, Deloitte Consulting LLP
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
This interactive lunch discussion will focus on challenges to the K-12 system and innovative initiatives designed to improve opportunities for students and educators. Leaders in business, philanthropy and post-secondary education will participate in this invitation-only dialogue with some of America's foremost educators and government officials.
Moderator
Lowell Milken, Co-Founder, Knowledge Universe Education; Founder, National Institute for Excellence in Teaching (NIET)
Speakers
Gray Davis, Of Counsel, Loeb & Loeb LLP; Former Governor of California
John Deasy, Superintendent-in-Residence, Broad Center for the Management of School Systems; Former Superintendent, Los Angeles Unified School District
Sara Heyburn, Executive Director, Tennessee State Board of Education
Ted Mitchell, Undersecretary, U.S. Department of Education
Gary Stark, President and CEO, National Institute for Excellence in Teaching
Antonio Villaraigosa, Senior Advisor, Banc of California; 41st Mayor of Los Angeles
George Weiss, Founder and Chairman, Say Yes to Education; CEO, Weiss Multi-Strategy Advisers LLC
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
In this session, Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer of Facebook, interviews former U.S. Treasury Secretaries Timothy Geithner, Henry Paulson and Robert Rubin about global economic trends, public finance and capital markets. Join us for a discussion among three renowned leaders of finance.
Welcoming Remarks
Eric Garcetti, Mayor, City of Los Angeles
Introduction By
Michael L. Klowden, President and Chief Executive Officer, Milken Institute
Moderator
Sheryl Sandberg, Chief Operating Officer, Facebook; Founder, LeanIn.Org
Speakers
Timothy Geithner, President, Warburg Pincus; former U.S. Treasury Secretary
Henry Paulson, Chairman, the Paulson Institute; Former U.S. Treasury Secretary
Robert Rubin, Co-Chairman, Council on Foreign Relations; Former U.S. Treasury Secretary
2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
Since her appointment as CEO of AARP in 2014, Jo Ann Jenkins has challenged the perception of aging as a process of deterioration, dependency, and decline by encouraging a public dialogue about improved health, opportunity and purposeful engagement for those over 50. She leads the world's largest nonprofit, nonpartisan membership organization dedicated to social change. Please join this session on strategies and solutions to advance the conversation so people will embrace aging as something to look forward to, not to fear.
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Two of the world's most respected investors and fund managers, Ken Griffin of Citadel and Mohamed El-Erian of Allianz, sit down for a rare chat to take a big-picture look at where the global economy is headed. They will share their thoughts on a wide range of issues affecting investors, markets and economies, from China's slowdown and Europe's future to energy prices and the rise of interest rates. Join them for a wide-ranging discussion about the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead.
Moderator
Gerard Baker, Editor-in-Chief, Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones
Speakers
Mohamed El-Erian, Chief Economic Advisor, Allianz; Chair, President’s Global Development Council
Kenneth Griffin, Founder and CEO, Citadel
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Learn first-hand from Tatsuo Yamasaki, Vice Minister for International Affairs, Ministry of Finance, about Abenomics, Japan's pro-growth economic policies. Yamasaki will share his insights on potential growth sectors, investment opportunities and obstacles that may stand in the way of reform.
Moderator
Kotaro Tamura, Asia Fellow, Milken Institute; Chairman, Japan Intelligence Initiative; Former Senator and Parliamentary Secretary for Economic and Fiscal Policy, Japan
Speaker
Tatsuo Yamasaki, Vice Minister of Finance for International Affairs, Ministry of Finance, Japan
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Host
Niall Ferguson, Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History, Harvard University; Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University
Speaker
Michael Mullen, Senior Advisor, Providence Equity; Former Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Once one of America's most important and vibrant cities, Detroit has suffered a slow but steady decline in recent decades as manufacturing jobs, companies and residents found greener pastures elsewhere. The low point occurred in 2013, when the city filed for bankruptcy protection -- the largest municipal case in U.S. history. After more than a year of intense negotiations, a plan was approved in late 2014 to finally exit bankruptcy. Experts on this panel -- people directly involved in the proceedings and others working to turn around the city's fortunes -- will discuss how the bankruptcy plan was hatched and how it was resolved. More important, they will look at Detroit's future and how the deal to address the debt will help. Is Detroit a model for how cities can manage their economic troubles? How can it, as well as other places struggling with the impact of globalization, crime and fiscal stress, recover?
Moderator
Gillian Tett, U.S. Managing Editor and Columnist, Financial Times
Speakers
Kenneth Buckfire, President and Co-Founder, Miller Buckfire & Co., LLC
Dan Gilbert, Founder and Chairman, Quicken Loans and Rock Ventures; Majority Owner, NBA Cleveland Cavaliers
Kevyn Orr, Former Emergency Manager, Detroit
Rick Snyder, Governor, Michigan
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Islamic banking, based on religious principles that forbid collecting interest, is one of the fastest-growing sectors in global finance and one that escaped significant damage during the financial crisis. Collectively, Sharia-compliant banks are forecast to grow at a rate of 20 percent a year through 2019, albeit from a low base. Despite this growth and record level of sukuk (Islamic Bond) issuance, the industry as a whole is still largely concentrated in the banking sector, creating the risk of government bailouts. Participants on this panel will discuss the expansion of Islamic finance and the effects it may have on capital flows and development. Will opportunities exist to expand into areas such as trade and infrastructure financing in Asia and Africa, where foreign banks have scaled back? Can regulatory and conventional market structures be aligned with the needs of Sharia-compliant intermediaries and their customers? What can be done to reduce fragmentation in Islamic finance markets due to differences in accepted standards of Sharia compliance?
Moderator
Matthew Rees, President, Geonomica; Senior Fellow; Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth College
Speakers
Mohammed Ahmed Alkhaja, Head of Asset Management, Osool Asset Management BSC
Charon Wardini bin Mokhzani , Executive Director, Managing Director's Office, Khazanah Nasional Berhad, Malaysia; Managing Director, Khazanah Research Institute
Sean Marion, Managing Director, Financial Institutions Group, Moody’s Corporation
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Is bigger better? Global hospitality chains are buying up competitors in a consolidation trend driven by abundant liquidity and low interest rates. But corporate M&A isn't the only disruptor in the industry. Independent "boutique" hotels offering personalized service are growing in popularity. And web-based home-sharing services, like Airbnb, are attracting millions of travelers eager to book cozy lodgings at a fraction of the prices charged by traditional hotels. The industry has shown an appetite for consolidation, but will bigger-is-better satisfy consumers' affinity for low cost and a personal touch? How will the boutique concept expand across the independent and branded global markets? And what categories and locales are ripest for M&A in 2015? Our panel of investors and executives will consider these questions and share their insights about the future of hospitality.
Moderator
Jesse Sharf, Partner and Co-Chair of Real Estate, Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP
Speakers
Alan Fuerstman, Founder and CEO, Montage Hotels & Resorts
Mahmood Khimji, Co-Founder and Principal, Highgate
David Palmer, President and CEO, Diamond Resorts International
Michael Rosenfeld, Founder and CEO, Woodridge Capital Partners
Henry Silverman, CEO, Cain Hoy Enterprises, LLC
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
From mobile banking to off-grid energy projects, new technologies are enabling Africa to bypass, or "leapfrog," traditional development challenges. The rapid adoption of cutting-edge technology is producing innovative solutions in health, financial services, energy, education, retail and more. In fact, some of the practices pioneered in Africa and other emerging economies, such as mobile payments, are being adopted by the developed world. What are these new ideas coming out of Africa? What type of business climate is needed to continue innovation and technological leapfrogging? And what role can local governments and the international community play in catalyzing progress? This invitation-only session will bring leaders from the public and private sector to discuss innovation in Africa.
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Emerging markets are shaping big brand strategy as demand for luxury runs in tandem with economic growth. Increasingly, younger generations are moving away from the traditional tastes of their parents and view luxury products and experiences as a demonstration of success and status. Globally, the market is growing. The number of luxury consumers has tripled in the past 20 years, with as much as a third of the new consumers coming from emerging nations. This increase in demand is good news for brands, but it also raises challenges. What is required to produce luxury for a global market without forfeiting authenticity? How are companies incorporating digital strategies with traditional marketing techniques? And what products are most in demand among these new buyers of luxury products?
Moderator
Jared Carney, Founder and CEO, Lightdale, LLC
Speakers
Tamara Mellon, Founder and Chief Creative Officer, Tamara Mellon; Former Chief Creative Officer and Co-Founder, Jimmy Choo
Precious Moloi-Motsepe , Founder and Executive Chairperson, African Fashion International; Co-Founder and Vice Chairperson, Motsepe Foundation
Dee Poon, Chief Brand Officer, PYE
Kevin Ryan, Chairman and Founder, GILT
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
With oil prices in the tank, the consumer dollar goes further. Indeed, the implications of oil's slide extend to the entire world economy, and many of these impacts favor the United States. One less-than-obvious effect is the risk that cheap oil poses to the green energy industry. Now renewables find it harder to compete on cost. But is price the key, or is public policy? Are short-term savings and geopolitical rivalries the most important considerations, or are reliance on a depleting resource and long-term costs to the climate? Our panel of energy and environmental experts will explore what happened to the theory of Peak Oil and whether the current glut is a permanent condition. Will unconventional oil drilling dry up at these prices? Can we live with the wild swings in the price of a barrel? What does the coal-vs.-natural-gas competition in electricity tell us about the future? Is your next car a Tesla or a Tundra?
Moderator
Greg Dalton, Executive Producer and Host, Climate One
Speakers
Scott Jacobs, CEO and Co-Founder, Generate Capital
Ian Wright, Founder and CEO, Wrightspeed; Co-Founder, Tesla Motors
Cathy Zoi, Consulting Professor and Director, Energy Transformation Collaborative, Stanford University; Former Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Though the needs and preferences of consumers dictate the course of almost every other industry, health care is one of the last major sectors to benefit from user-centered design. But the sands are shifting. Tremendous momentum is gathering as industry, government, academia and disease groups all work together to ensure that what patients want, and the risks and tradeoffs they're willing to accept, is reflected in the research, the medical product marketplace and the health-care delivery system. Learn about the science of patient input, and how it is improving health care, from a panel of patients, policymakers and industry leaders.
Moderator
Kim McCleary, Director, Strategic Initiatives, FasterCures, a Center of the Milken Institute
Speakers
Tony Coles, Chairman and CEO, Yumanity Therapeutics
Louis DeGennaro, President and CEO, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
Bray Patrick-Lake, Director, Stakeholder Engagement, Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative, Duke University; Co-Chair, NIH Advisory Committee to the Director Working Group, Precision Medicine Initiative
Mace Rothenberg, Chief Medical Officer and Senior Vice President of Clinical Development and Medical Affairs, Pfizer Oncology
Joe Selby, Executive Director, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Traditional education, built around books and classroom activities, no longer prepares students for today's digital world or the job market that it has created. Education needs to embrace the tools young people use every day -- phones, tablets and smartwatches -- to engage with one another and the world. Videos, interactive gaming and digital media make learning more efficient and practical. Likewise, school curricula need an overhaul to give students the skills -- such as code writing and programming -- that technology companies demand. As experts have noted, almost everything we rely on today requires software code, but there aren't enough people who know how to write it. Learn more about the innovative approaches people are taking to inspire and train students for the jobs of the future.
Moderator
Van Jones, President, Dream Corps Unlimited, CNN Political Contributor
Speakers
Troy Carter, Founder and CEO, Atom Factory
Rosalind Hudnell, Vice President, Human Resources, and Chief Diversity Officer, Intel Corp.
James Shelton, Former Deputy Secretary, U.S. Department of Education
will.i.am, Entertainer and Producer; Founder and CEO, i.am+
Connie Yowell, Director of Education, MacArthur Foundation
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
The alarm has sounded in the fixed-income markets, with the Bank for International Settlements being the latest major authority to warn about the lack of liquidity. Historically low interest rates, surging bond issuance and shrinking dealer balance sheets all raise the risk that a minor dislocation will cause a panic as sellers overwhelm a thinly traded marketplace. Is this the new normal in fixed-income trading, or are there viable alternatives to the current fixed-income market structure? What effect is electronic trading having on the various types of fixed-income securities? Are sharp price swings like the one experienced in Treasuries in October going to become more common, or was that an isolated incident? This panel will include perspectives from a diverse group of participants sharing their views on what the market holds for issuers, traders and investors.
Moderator
Larry Tabb, Founder and CEO, TABB Group
Speakers
Constantinos Antoniades, Head of Fixed Income, Liquidnet
Michael Freno, Head, U.S. High Yield Investments Group, Babson Capital Management
Amy Koch, Managing Director and Head of Fixed-Income Trading, Standish
Fred Orlan, Global Head, Fixed Income, Jefferies
Michael Piwowar, Commissioner, Securities and Exchange Commission
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
A growing number of investors, policymakers and NGOs recognize the economic and social value of gender-inclusive leadership teams as part of their high-growth investment strategies. An investor focus on female entrepreneurs and their teams makes financial sense given the increasing number of women with leadership experience and advanced education. In fact, research indicates that companies perform better when men and women work together. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology found that the collective IQ of problem-solving teams increases when more women are included. The findings, and the real-world success of female entrepreneurs in the marketplace, suggest that gender-inclusive management leads to higher performance and faster growth. Join a panel of investors and entrepreneurs as they discuss startup and high-growth companies that are benefiting from inclusive management.
Moderator
Sharon Vosmek, CEO, Astia
Speakers
Christopher Ailman, Chief Investment Officer, California State Teachers’ Retirement System
Seema Hingorani, Managing Partner, Seema R. Hingorani Partners; Former Chief Investment Officer, Bureau of Asset Management, City of New York
Mellody Hobson, President, Ariel Investments
Shanna Tellerman, Founder and CEO, Pencil & Pixel; Former Partner, Google Ventures
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

Hosts
Van Jones, President, Dream Corps Unlimited, CNN Political Contributor
will.i.am, Entertainer and Producer; Founder and CEO, i.am+
Speakers
Troy Carter, Founder and CEO, Atom Factory
Rosalind Hudnell, Vice President, Human Resources, and Chief Diversity Officer, Intel Corp.
Freada Kapor Klein, Partner, Kapor Capital; Partner, Kapor Center for Social Impact
Nanxi Liu, Co-Founder and CEO, Enplug; Co-Founder and Chairman, Nanoly Bioscience
James Shelton, Former Deputy Secretary, U.S. Department of Education
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Hollywood's fascination with China, and its fast-growing movie market, is getting stronger. Increasingly, U.S. studios seem to be making movies with a Chinese audience in mind, part of a strategy to court Chinese investment and win a bigger share of the country's burgeoning box-office sales. The shifting focus was evident in last year's "Transformers: Age of Extinction," which featured Chinese products like Shuhua milk and Jian Nan Chun liquor. And the trend is likely to continue. U.S. box-office sales have shown little growth over the past decade. The Chinese ticket sales, by contrast, are growing about 30 percent a year and are expected to surpass the U.S. by 2020. But how far can Hollywood, long considered an ambassador of American culture, go in its courtship of the Chinese consumer? What does it mean for investors and for Hollywood's sustainability?
Moderator
Kevin Klowden, Managing Director, California Center, and Managing Economist, Milken Institute
Speakers
Stuart Ford, Founder and CEO, IM Global
Brian Goldsmith, Co-Chief Operating Officer, Lionsgate
Ryan Kavanaugh, Founder and CEO, Relativity Media
Robert Simonds, Chairman and CEO, STX Entertainment
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
A widening gap between haves and have-nots is shrinking the American middle class and making it tougher than ever to move up the economic ladder. The U.S. problem reflects a worldwide concentration of wealth. The top 1 percent control 48 percent of the world's assets, up from 44 percent in 2009. Disparate voices ranging from Pope Francis to IMF Director Christine Lagarde warn that the gulf between rich and poor diminishes hope and raises serious political and economic issues. Some companies are listening. Late last year, Walmart Stores pledged to end minimum-wage pay by raising the hourly rate of 500,000 workers. Other companies followed with similar increases for their lowest-paid workers. Will their announcements spur broader efforts to reduce income equality? What else can be done to lift the standard of living for the working poor? This panel will examine the challenges posed by income disparity and discuss strategies for closing the gap.
Moderator
Alan Schwartz, Executive Chairman, Guggenheim Partners
Speakers
Jared Bernstein, Economic Policy Fellow, Milken Institute; Senior Fellow, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities; Former Chief Economist to Vice President Joe Biden
Beth Ann Bovino, U.S. Chief Economist, Global Economics and Research, Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services
Arthur Brooks, President, American Enterprise Institute
Jeff Greene, Investor and Philanthropist
Kristin Oliver, Executive Vice President, People, Walmart U.S.
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
The global population will reach 9 billion by 2050, an increase that will exacerbate shortfalls in food production and distribution. A new spirit of collaboration is needed among scientists, business and governments to reduce hunger and avoid the geopolitical consequences created by food shortages. Agriculture, water, energy, infrastructure and industry all are critical components of food security. Yet too often, experts in each sector work in isolation. Stronger partnerships that combine resources and expertise are necessary to attract investment and develop the technologies needed to improve the global food supply. This panel will discuss examples of successful partnerships. Panelists will highlight best practices for joining forces across sectors and disciplines to create a food-secure future.
Moderator
David Evans, Chief of Global Philanthropy, UNICEF
Speakers
R. Hunter Biden, Chairman, World Food Program USA; Managing Partner, Rosemont Seneca Partners
Mpule Kwelagobe, Managing Partner, QuesS Capital LLC; CEO, Institute for Endogenous Development
Gregory Page, Executive Chairman, Cargill
Axton Salim, Director, PT Indofood Sukses Makmur Tbk
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson sees U.S.-China cooperation as the key to solving big global problems. During his career in government and banking, Paulson made more than 100 trips to China, developing close relationships with the country's top political and business leaders. The experience has given him key insight into China's emergence as the world's second-largest economy. His conclusions include a firm belief that better relations between the U.S. and China will hasten solutions to pressing challenges such as global warming and slowing economic growth. Join him as he talks with Pulitzer Prize winner Sheryl WuDunn about his book, "Dealing With China: An Insider Unmasks the New Economic Superpower," and shares insights on important issues in China, including economic reform and President Xi Jinping's crackdown on corruption. Following the session, Paulson will sign copies of his book.
Interviewer
Sheryl WuDunn, Co-Founder, FullSky Capital; Co-Author, “China Wakes” and “A Path Appears”
Speaker
Henry Paulson, Chairman, the Paulson Institute; Former U.S. Treasury Secretary
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Alzheimer's disease, with no treatment or cure in sight, is one of the most acute and complex health challenges of our time. Experts estimate that by 2050, 15 million people in the U.S. will be diagnosed with Alzheimer's. With associated healthcare costs of $1.2 trillion, the epidemic will rob us time with loved ones and place a drag on the economy. And while a solution will require all hands on deck from government, industry, and academia, there are critical opportunities for philanthropy to play a role. Learn about ways to join the fight against this disease from those on the front lines who are treating patients, studying the biology, and financing new strategies that could lead to cures.
Moderator
Melissa Stevens, Deputy Executive Director, FasterCures, a Center of the Milken Institute
Speakers
Francis Collins, Director, National Institutes of Health
Jeffrey Cummings, Director, Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health
David Dolby, Managing Director, Dolby Family Ventures; Board Member, Dolby Laboratories
Trish Vradenburg, Co-Founder, Vradenburg Foundation, USAgainstAlzheimer’s
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
The world's middle class is expected to burgeon from less than 2 billion consumers today to nearly 5 billion by 2030, reflecting rapid growth in developing nations. The changing demographics are rapidly expanding markets for the providers of entertainment, household goods, snacks and beverages. How are consumer-driven industries keeping up with these potential new customers? What tactics are global multinationals employing to maintain their market share? Which local players are rising to prominence and how are they uniquely positioned to tap into demand? This panel will bring together industry leaders and experts -- including senior executives from developing regions and the global stage -- to discuss their strategies and predictions for the future of global consumerism.
Moderator
Ali Velshi, Host, "Real Money with Ali Velshi," Al Jazeera America
Speakers
Mitch Barns, CEO, Nielsen
Mark Clouse, Chief Growth Officer, Mondelēz International
Justin Leong, Head, Strategic Investments and Corporate Affairs, Genting Group
Vimal Shah, CEO, Bidco Africa Ltd.
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
The last century has seen advances in life span leading to individual and societal achievements that would have been unimaginable to prior generations. While extending life is a remarkable accomplishment, we must do more to extend health span -- the length of time we are in optimal health. From the battle to control chronic disease to the efforts to conquer Alzheimer's, there's much work to do. But hope is on the horizon. Advances in genomics arm scientists with greater knowledge about our health profiles than ever before. Awareness about the importance of prevention, nutrition and exercise is growing daily. New health technologies empower individuals. Personalized and precision medicine enables doctors to customize advice and treatment. Healthy aging is within our reach, but it will take personal responsibility and societal resolve to make it happen. Our panel of experts will shed new light on the changing health landscape and on the actions every individual can take to enhance their prospects for healthy aging.
Moderator
Paul Irving, Chairman, Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging; Distinguished Scholar in Residence, University of Southern California Davis School of Gerontology
Speakers
Pinchas Cohen, Dean, Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California
Yves Joanette, Professor of Cognitive Neurosciences and Aging, Université de Montreal; Scientific Director, Institute of Aging, Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Freda Lewis-Hall, Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Pfizer, Inc.
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Private equity had a bumper year in 2014, with more than $500 billion worth of deals globally--the most since 2007. Corporate buyers returned to the market and valuations continued to rise while interest rates didn't. With an extraordinary series of exits under their belts, PE firms have built up cash in anticipation of a buying spree, but many say the pipeline of attractive deals has narrowed. Our panel of private equity luminaries will share their views about how their strategies are changing amid record valuations and a more complex geopolitical environment. Has credit become a smarter focus than corporate buyouts? Are we in the midst of a tech bubble and has the pain in the oil patch generated opportunities?
Moderator
Maria Bartiromo, Anchor and Global Markets Editor, Fox Business Network
Speakers
Leon Black, Chairman and CEO, Apollo Global Management
Jim Coulter, CEO and Founding Partner, TPG; Co-Chair, Leading Education by Advancing Digital Commission
Jonathan Nelson, Founder and CEO, Providence Equity Partners
Stephen Schwarzman, Chairman, CEO and Co-Founder, Blackstone
Robert Smith, Founder, Chairman and CEO, Vista Equity Partners
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Universities play a vital role in our world. They prepare students to compete for high-quality jobs, drive economic growth, produce innovative and life-saving research, and nurture an enlightened and generous citizenry. However, our universities are under significant pressure. There is a perception that tuition costs are out of reach to many and students are forced to accumulate a staggering amount of debt. Technology is creating disruptive educational models that have led to increased competition. The president and the secretary of education have called for an effort to quantify the value of a college degree, including government ranking schools based upon such metrics as accelerated graduation rates, higher percentages of graduates employed, enhanced access and affordability. Distinguished university presidents from public, private and community institutions join a key Department of Education leader to discuss how these challenges are being addressed.
Moderator
Jeffrey Selingo, Author; Contributor, Washington Post; Professor of Practice, Arizona State University
Speakers
Mitch Daniels, President, Purdue University; Former Governor, Indiana
Steven Knapp, President, George Washington University
Ted Mitchell, Undersecretary, U.S. Department of Education
Eduardo Padrón, President, Miami Dade College
Carol Quillen, President, Davidson College
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
The world is changing fast. But in what direction? There are powerful trends we know about, but what are the realities we can't yet imagine? Technology is disrupting industries and connecting everyone on the planet. Emerging markets are flexing their economic muscle. Geopolitical struggles are posing new risks for governments and companies. How are these factors shaping the world we'll live in a decade hence? Don't make assumptions about the future until you've heard from our panel of experts, who have unique perspectives on where the world is headed. What kind of work will become obsolete, and what types of jobs will be created? How much progress can we make against disease, poverty and climate change, and how will that figure into the economic equation? How do leaders prepare for the future?
Moderator
Brian Sullivan, Anchor, CNBC
Speakers
Karen Harris, Director, Macro Trends Group, Bain & Co.
Carey Kolaja, Vice President, Global Consumer Products, PayPal
Pablo Legorreta, Founder and CEO, Royalty Pharma
Strive Masiyiwa, Founder and Chairman, Econet Wireless
James McCaughan, CEO, Principal Global Investors; President, Global Asset Management, Principal Financial Group
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Just three decades ago, Shenzhen was a modest fishing village of 30,000 people on the south coast of China. Today, it is a booming metropolis of 10 million inhabitants, boasting modern skyscrapers, packed shopping malls and a state-of-the-art transportation system. The megatrends illustrated by Shenzhen's growth, including urbanization, demographics, and climate change, have the potential to create long-term opportunities and risks for investors. This private session will discuss both the practical challenges and the benefits of taking a thematic lens to investment portfolios across asset classes and share what some investors are doing today. Questions to be addressed include: What strategies are sustainable and how quickly do they play out? How do you translate a broad theme into an individual investment? How do institutional investors consider cross-asset class portfolios in asset allocation?
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Marketplace lending, the use of online services to loan and borrow money, may be revolutionizing the financial world. The fast-growing industry accounted for almost $9 billion in loans last year, a figure that could rise to $1 trillion annually by 2025, according to Foundation Capital. Marketplace lenders appeal to small businesses and consumers because costs are lower than those charged by banks and credit card companies. Investors have taken notice. Lending Club raised $1 billion in an IPO last year and OnDeck attracted $200 million in a public offering. Not everyone is a fan. Critics say the growth forecasts for the industry are too optimistic for an industry that hasn't been tested by time or competition. How will online lenders fare in a climate of rising interest rates? And can they weather the next downturn? And are online lenders' tech-based methods for assessing risk as accurate as traditional techniques?
Moderator
Amy Cortese, Journalist, New York Times Contributor; Author, “Locavesting”
Speakers
Jeff Bogan, Head of Institutional Group, Lending Club
Noah Breslow, CEO, OnDeck
Lewis Feldman, Partner and Crowdfunding Practice Chair, Goodwin Procter LLP; CEO, Heritage Capital Ventures LLC
Sam Hodges, Co-Founder and U.S. Managing Director, Funding Circle
Aaron Vermut, CEO, Prosper Marketplace
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Japan's fiscal stimulus and monetary easing policies has boosted stock prices and increased exports with the Nikkei reaching a fresh 15-year high. However, the country's largest economic challenges remain demography and poor corporate governance. Workforce expansion and improved oversight of corporate decision-making are key to maintaining consumer demand and attracting investment. For the first time in history, the government will relax immigration policy to augment Japan's shrinking and rapidly aging workforce and introduce a corporate governance code. However, ethnocentric sentiments are entrenched in Japanese society. Will the government bow to public pressure to reverse the new policy, or will the need to revive the economy lead to the introduction of a more liberal immigration scheme? How would independent directors improve oversight? What would be the impact on the Japanese economy and the success of Abenomics?
Moderator
Kotaro Tamura, Asia Fellow, Milken Institute; Chairman, Japan Intelligence Initiative; Former Senator and Parliamentary Secretary for Economic and Fiscal Policy, Japan
Speakers
Koichi Hamada, Tuntex Professor Emeritus of Economics at Yale University; Special Advisor, Prime Minister of Japan
John Koudounis, President and CEO, Mizuho Securities USA Inc.
Kathy Matsui, Vice Chair, Goldman Sachs Japan Co., Ltd.
Tatsuo Yamasaki, Vice Minister of Finance for International Affairs, Ministry of Finance, Japan
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Please join us for this fast-paced, high-energy competition, in which early-stage entrepreneurs pitch their startups before an audience of technology influencers, financiers and thought leaders. A panel of high-profile judges will provide the contestants with guidance and evaluate their pitches based on growth potential, business strategy, impact and onstage performance. While the judges can name only one winner, all of the participants will gain priceless experience.
Host
Daniel Gorfine, Adjunct Fellow, Milken Institute; Vice President, External Affairs and Associate General Counsel, OnDeck
Entrepreneurs
Will Hurley, Co-Founder and CEO, Honest Dollar
Ari Litan, Co-Founder, Swish
Mikhail Naumov, President and Chief Strategy Officer, DigitalGenius
Noor Siddiqui, CEO, Remedy, Inc.
Jase Wilson, Co-Founder and CEO, Neighborly
Judges
B. Bonin Bough, Vice President, Global Media and Consumer Engagement, Mondelēz International
Troy Carter, Founder and CEO, Atom Factory
Lindy Fishburne, Executive Director, Breakout Labs and Senior Vice President, Investments, Thiel Foundation
Avid Larizadeh Duggan, General Partner, Google Ventures
5:00 pm - 5:45 pm
In this session, Oscar-winning film and television producer Brian Grazer explains why he has made it a point to have a conversation with a stranger each week as he has sought to build a bigger, more fulfilling life. Sharing his observations with friend Robert Iger, CEO of Disney, Brian will discuss what curiosity has meant to him and how it has shaped not only his highly successful career in entertainment, but his personal life.
Interviewer
Robert Iger, Chairman and CEO, The Walt Disney Company
Speaker
Brian Grazer, Film and Television Producer; Co-Chairman, Imagine Entertainment
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Male dominance of the investment management industry is no secret. But it's also true that companies around the world are beginning to recognize the benefits of developing and promoting women to senior leadership positions. The positive outcomes include improved operating performance and productivity as well as an enhanced ability to attract and retain high-quality talent. Engaging CEOs and managers at all levels to embrace and champion gender balance is critical to achieving success in the global competition for talent. This discussion will provide a framework outlining five areas to address to achieve gender balance at the highest levels of leadership and highlight the experiences of the individuals who are leading this transformation in their own organizations.
Moderator
James McCaughan, CEO, Principal Global Investors; President, Global Asset Management, Principal Financial Group
Speakers
Ana María Carrasquilla, Chairman and Executive President, Fondo Latinoamericano de Reservas
Claire Cockerton, CEO, Innovate Finance; Chairwoman, Entiq
John Coombe, Executive Director, JANA
Hua Fan, Senior Managing Director, Head of Fixed-Income and Absolute-Return Investment, China Investment Corp.
Alexis Krivkovich, Partner, McKinsey & Co.
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
The economies of developed nations are back on track, or are getting there. The U.S. and UK both are in growth mode, and quantitative easing and low oil prices should lift Japan and the euro zone. But the outlook is less optimistic for developing and emerging nations that depend on exports of petroleum or other commodities. Russia's economy remains weak as a result of the oil glut and Western sanctions. Brazil is near recession and growth in China may dip below 7 percent. Among the BRIC nations, only India is likely to witness accelerating growth. Emerging Asia may take up some of the slack, but the global downside risks are clear. What if there is a Grexit? Would it derail the euro zone recovery? What if consumers save the windfall from low oil prices and investment in exploration is severely restrained? Have markets underestimated the risks from Fed interest rate increases in the U.S.? Equity markets have been on a tear despite continuing deflationary risk. Where will the global economy be on balance?
Moderator
Niall Ferguson, Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History, Harvard University; Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University
Speakers
Madelyn Antoncic, Vice President and Treasurer, World Bank
Pierre Beaudoin , Executive Chairman, Bombardier Inc.
Bob Collymore, CEO, Safaricom Ltd.
Jamie Forese , Co-President and Head of Institutional Clients Group, Citi
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
We invite you to join a special reception with our top supporters and speakers to celebrate the Milken Institute's growing international presence and community. This event will honor our special guests, the Kenyan and Rwandan Presidential Delegations, and celebrate public and private-sector collaboration.
6:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Welcoming Remarks
Elena Zager, Associate Director, Business and Program Development, Milken Institute
Moderator
Skip Rimer, Executive Director, Events, Milken Institute
Speaker
Michael Eisner, Founder and CEO, The Tornante Co.; Former Chairman and CEO, the Walt Disney Co.
7:00 pm - 8:45 pm
From movable type in the 11th century to wearable devices in the 21st, media and technology have always gone hand in hand. Today, with the influx of once-unfathomable amounts of consumer data, that relationship is getting a lot more personal. Most people by now take for granted that they surrender small amounts of personal information with every online interaction, but few realize how companies use this data to customize the consumer experience. Which companies will win the battle for your attention? Likely those that best understand you and your particular preferences and needs. Join leaders from the fast-converging worlds of data, media and technology as they discuss, debate and show examples of the content they hope will capture -- and keep -- your attention.
Speakers
Barry Diller, Chairman and Senior Executive, IAC; Chairman and Senior Executive, Expedia, Inc.
Bobby Kotick, CEO, Activision Blizzard
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Robert Pittman, Chairman and CEO, iHeartMedia Inc.; Founder, MTV
9:00 pm - 10:30 pm
Join us for a fun, relaxing evening of entertainment and music.
Tuesday, April 28, 2015
6:00 am - 8:30 am

6:00 am - 7:00 pm
Registration for the 2015 Global Conference will be available in the Beverly Hilton lobby
6:45 am - 8:00 am

Moderator
Michael L. Klowden, President and Chief Executive Officer, Milken Institute
Speaker
Jackie Reses, Chief Development Officer, Yahoo
7:00 am - 9:15 am
This annual meeting of the Global Capital Markets Advisory Council (GCMAC) brings together senior leaders of large global funds to discuss the issues driving their investment decisions. With the participation of Milken Institute Chairman Michael Milken, the council's off-the-record discussion will offer valuable insight into current conditions in major markets and sectors. This year's conversation, moderated by GCMAC Co-Chair and CalSTRS Chief Investment Officer Christopher Ailman, will range widely, touching on asset allocation, the changing strategies of asset owners, opportunities developing around the world and more.
Moderator
Christopher Ailman, Chief Investment Officer, California State Teachers’ Retirement System
8:00 am - 9:15 am
Ben Horowitz, co-founder and general partner of Andreessen Horowitz, is one of Silicon Valley's most successful venture capitalists. The firm he built with co-founder Marc Andreesen has picked some of the tech world's biggest winners, including Facebook, Box, Airbnb and Twitter. Horowitz will sit down with journalist Kara Swisher to share advice and anecdotes from his hard-earned rise. Known for his trademark humor and straight talk, Horowitz will draw from his most personal, humbling life experiences. Whether you're an entrepreneur with little more than the germ of an idea or a CEO who has climbed to the top and is running an empire, you will benefit from hearing Horowitz discuss challenges and issues that confront leaders at every level.
Moderator
Kara Swisher, Co-CEO, Revere Digital; Co-Executive Editor, Re/code
Speaker
Ben Horowitz , Co-founder and Partner, Andreessen Horowitz
8:00 am - 9:15 am
The latest Ebola crisis proved that health systems are equipped to contain a major outbreak of infectious disease. In an increasingly connected world, highly contagious diseases travel across porous borders without notice. The cost in lives and economic growth can be enormous. Diseases such as malaria can stunt GDP growth by nearly 1.5 percent and tuberculosis can trigger a drop of 4 percent to 6 percent. For some diseases, such as Ebola, health services are handicapped because there is no vaccine to prevent its spread or drug to cure those who have it. Pharmaceutical companies have little financial incentive to develop medicines for diseases found mostly in poor countries. Panelists will explore the human and economic consequences of infectious disease and how incentives can encourage investment to find effective treatments.
Moderator
Thomas Evans, CEO, Aeras
Speakers
Michel De Wilde, Board member, Infectious Disease Research Institute; Former Senior Vice President, Research and Development, Sanofi Pasteur
Katherine DeLand, Chief of Staff, Ebola Response, World Health Organization
Gabrielle Fitzgerald, Director, Ebola Program, Paul Allen Family Foundation
Pranav Shetty, Global Emergency Health Coordinator, International Medical Corps
8:00 am - 9:15 am
Assets under management continue to grow and, by some forecasts, global AUM will top $100 trillion by 2020. Yet its concentration in fewer and fewer hands is a trend proceeding in parallel and raising the dangers associated with herd behavior and pro-cyclical investment strategies. Financial globalization is leading to more intense ebbs and flows of capital across borders, changing the fortunes of not only investors, but nations. In addition, the growth in the asset management industry is fundamentally changing the ways markets function - absorbing certain roles that used to be entirely the domain of investment banks - and distributing risk in unexpected ways. In light of these developments, are there systemic risks posed by concentration of assets or is the alarm borne from a fundamental misunderstanding of the role that managers play? In this new era, how is risk distributed? What new paradigms exist for analyzing it? The investors on this panel will discuss these and other conditions transforming the global monetary system.
Moderator
Erik Schatzker, Anchor and Editor-at-Large, Bloomberg Television
Speakers
Kent Clark, Managing Director, Goldman Sachs; Chief Investment Officer, AIMS Hedge Fund Strategies
Jeffrey Gundlach, CEO and Chief Investment Officer, DoubleLine Capital L.P.
David Harding, CEO, Winton
John Skjervem, Chief Investment Officer, Oregon State Treasury
Jes Staley, Managing Partner, BlueMountain Capital Management LLC
8:00 am - 9:15 am
The U.S., buoyed by low oil prices and a soaring stock market, appears to have resumed its traditional role as a catalyst for the global economy. As Japan, the euro zone, oil exporters and BRIC countries all struggle, the U.S. is poised for further growth. The positive signs include lower household debt, a recovering house market, low oil prices and increased business investment. Nevertheless, there are reasons for concern. Many point out that the shale oil boom has reduced U.S. dependence on oil imports, limiting the stimulus that typically results from low prices. And the stronger dollar is a problem for U.S. exporters and companies that must convert foreign earnings into U.S. currency. Other questions arise. Are bond markets underestimating the timing and speed of Fed interest rate hikes? Might equity valuations be harmed by higher interest rates? Join this panel for a discussion of these questions and more.
Moderator
Ross DeVol, Chief Research Officer, Milken Institute
Speakers
John Danhakl, Managing Partner, Leonard Green & Partners
William Kahane, Co-Founder, AR Capital
Sarah Quinlan, Senior Vice President, Market Insights, MasterCard Advisors
Gene Sperling, President, Sperling Economic Strategies; Former National Economic Advisor to Presidents Obama and Clinton
9:30 am - 10:30 am
An invitation-only interactive discussion for CEOs focusing on how their leadership can transform gender equality into a fundamental part of their organizations, rather than a special-interest issue. In the UK, the 30% Club's distinctive approach of encouraging chairs and CEOs leaders -- male and female -- to work together for change has delivered significant results. In just four years, the proportion of FTSE 100 board seats held by women has almost doubled, rising to 23 percent from 12.5 percent. Moreover, there are no longer any all-male boards at FTSE 100 companies. The 30% Club is now focused on cultivating a corporate ecosystem that nurtures male and female talent equally. During this roundtable, Grauer and Morrissey will share their own experiences in guiding companies toward gender equality and discuss specific steps CEOs can take to become part of this business-led approach to inclusive leadership.
Moderator
Katie O'Reilly, Executive Director, Business and Program Development, Milken Institute
Hosts
Susan Gilchrist, Group CEO, Brunswick Group LLC
Peter Grauer, Chairman, Bloomberg LP; Founding U.S. Chair, 30% Club
James McCaughan, CEO, Principal Global Investors; President, Global Asset Management, Principal Financial Group
Helena Morrissey, CEO, Newton; Founder, 30% Club
9:30 am - 10:30 am

Host
Ross DeVol, Chief Research Officer, Milken Institute
Speaker
Nouriel Roubini, Chairman, Roubini Global Economics; Professor of Economics, Stern School of Business, New York University
9:30 am - 10:30 am
In the race for global innovation, the ability to grow and nurture a new business provides an essential advantage. While most of the attention has focused on entrepreneurial hotspots such as the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles has emerged as one of the world's leading centers of small business. Whether driven by a risk-taking culture or a desire to embrace the new, communities throughout the Los Angeles region have developed a key edge in nurturing a generation of new small business leaders. Whether the advantage comes from the accessibility of high technology, the area's vast creative community or the drive of immigrant entrepreneurs to succeed in a new land, Los Angeles is shaping its future.
Moderator
Steven Drobny, Founder and CEO, Drobny Capital; Founder, Clocktower Technology Ventures
Speakers
Walter Delph, Partner and Managing Director, BCG Digital Ventures
Kara Nortman, Partner, Upfront Ventures; Chairman, Seedling
Scott Painter, Founder and CEO, TrueCar
Julie Schoenfeld, Founder and CEO, Strobe Inc.
Steven Sugarman, President and CEO, Banc of California
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Meet the millennials--though you probably won't do that at the mall. They tend to like their commerce digital, along with much of their social lives. This giant cohort born between 1980 and 2000, about 80 million strong in the United States, is viewed as hard to market to. Indeed, millennials are tough customers compared to baby boomers and Gen X. Why? They're widely eclectic in their tastes and impossible to pigeonhole. They want their opinions heard and their influence felt, including by the companies they buy from. And they are known for collecting experiences rather than investing in things, which may be partly explained by Gen-Xers having to wait for boomers to retire before getting their careers in gear. Even so, millennials represent the fastest-growing segment of today's workforce and are building massive spending power. How do we sell to, manage and motivate this new breed? How can they be integrated into a multigenerational organization? We'll discuss their habits and attitudes, explore their preferred modes of communication and answer the trillion-dollar question: What do millennials want?
Moderator
Lori Kozlowski, Editorial Director, Atom Factory
Speakers
David D. Burstein, CEO and Co-Founder, Run for America; Author, "Fast Future: How the Millennial Generation Is Shaping Our World."
Christie Garton, Creator, UChic; Social Entrepreneur
Meabh Quoirin, Managing Director, Future Foundation
Matthew Segal, Co-Founder, Attn:; Former President, OurTime.org
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Smart grid, smart phone.... smart toaster? In the near future, theorists say, virtually every kind of object and device will be digitized and Web-enabled. That's a simple synopsis of the ballyhooed Internet of Things. You'll not only command your appliances remotely, but they'll be striking up conversations among themselves. Eventually, trillions of objects will be networked, each one animated by information, and generating plenty of it as well. In the Internet of Things era, Big Data will get much, much bigger. Who will control this data, and how will it be used? Another risk: With everything online, the terrain of hacking expands. Who'll be privy to your medical alerts? Will your TV see what's happening on the sofa? From the user's point of view, will there be a technical standard or will you have to program your increasingly complex car, watch, lamps and massage chair in different ways? If IOT represents a true transformation, it may also present a whopping investment opportunity. And who will make it happen? Apple, Cisco, Google or trailblazers we haven't yet heard of?
Moderator
Michael Schrage, Research Fellow, MIT Sloan Initiative on the Digital Economy
Speakers
Marc Goodman, Author, “Future Crimes”; Chair for Policy, Law and Ethics, Singularity University
Alex Hawkinson, Founder and CEO, SmartThings
Bridget Karlin, Managing Director, IoT Strategy and Technology Office, Internet of Things Group, Intel Corp.
Gary Shapiro, President and CEO, Consumer Electronics Association
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Opportunities in real estate vary greatly by country and asset class. Where are investors likely to find the best returns? Are slow-growth markets, such as the euro zone, undervalued? Are there still plays to be made in the U.S., where the Fed is poised to raise interest rates? With China's markets slowing, where should investors look in Asia? Do some locations in Latin America look attractive or are markets still too pricey? What are the trends by asset classes (commercial, retail, industrial, multi-family, single family, hospitality)? As equity markets become expensive relative to earnings, will more investors turn to real estate for appreciation and a rate of return? What are the leading sources of capital? Is debt or equity the way to proceed? What about capital for new construction? Listen as a panel of leading investors discuss opportunities and risk in the world's real estate markets.
Moderator
Stephanie Ruhle, Anchor and Managing Editor, Bloomberg Television; Editor-at-Large, Bloomberg News
Speakers
Tom Barrack, Executive Chairman, Colony Capital Inc.
Minta Kay, Partner, Goodwin Procter LLP
Eyal Ofer, Chairman, Ofer Global
John Pattar, Managing Director, CLSA
Sam Zell, Chairman, Equity Group Investments
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Despite slowdowns, developing regions are near the top of global growth forecasts and remain strategically important. A variety of factors, including rising incomes, quick adoption of new technologies and increasingly talented workforces all point to long-term growth and high returns for investors in these markets. This panel will bring together local and global companies and investors to discuss their strategies for doing business in developing markets. How important is regional stability and good governance to both business operators and investors? What roles do multinational corporations play and how are they adapting their business models in these regions? And what structural reforms are needed?
Moderator
Matthew Bishop, Globalization Editor, the Economist
Speakers
Mark Cutis, Chief Investment Officer, Special Situations, Abu Dhabi Investment Council
Jay Ireland, President and CEO, GE Africa
A.B.C. Orjiako, Chairman, Seplat Petroleum Development Co. Plc
Juan Sartori, Founder and Executive Chairman, Union Group
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Latin America represents one of the great areas of growth not only in the global middle class, but also in terms of international investment flows. As the economies of the region continue to grow and mature, significant new opportunities continue to develop not only for investors from the U.S., Asia and Europe, but for Latin American family offices, private equity and investment funds. In particular, we will focus on the tremendous diversity in Latin America and how it is affecting the investment climate. Topics will include such factors as the recent economic uncertainty in Brazil, the increase in Mexican manufacturing and the rising consumer classes in Colombia and Chile, among others. This session is intended to serve as a foundation for an ongoing dialogue not only on what factors differentiate Latin American investors and opportunities, but also on what opportunities exist for collaboration both in the short and long term.
Moderator
Cate Ambrose, President and Executive Director, Latin American Private Equity & Venture Capital Association
Speakers
Joaquín Ayuso de Pául, Founder and CEO, Kuapay Technologies, Inc.
Alejandro Bezanilla, Chief Investment Officer, AFP Habitat
Ana María Carrasquilla, Chairman and Executive President, Fondo Latinoamericano de Reservas
Everaldo França, Founder and CEO, PPS Portfolio Performance Ltd.
9:30 am - 10:30 am
The hard work of policymakers, educators, parents and students to improve America's elementary and secondary schools has begun to pay off. But all too many students in large urban districts and rural areas are still being left behind. Leaders must remain diligent to ensure that students in every classroom have a high-quality educational experience. This panel will explore specific steps we can take move faster to improve the learning environment for all students. What role should charter schools, common core standards, teacher preparation programs and other initiatives play? How do we evaluate the role of the federal government, and what is the right balance between accountability and flexibility? Can we reach a consensus and collaborate on achieving shared goals?
Moderator
Lowell Milken, Co-Founder, Knowledge Universe Education; Founder, National Institute for Excellence in Teaching (NIET)
Speakers
Rudolph Crew, President, Medgar Evers College, the City University of New York; Former Chancellor, New York City Public Schools
John Deasy, Superintendent-in-Residence, Broad Center for the Management of School Systems; Former Superintendent, Los Angeles Unified School District
Sara Heyburn, Executive Director, Tennessee State Board of Education
Eva Moskowitz, Founder and CEO, Success Academy Charter Schools
Kristan Van Hook, Senior Vice President, Public Policy and Development, National Institute for Excellence in Teaching
9:30 am - 10:30 am
The cost of capital for medical R&D is high because investors must be compensated for the long, risky development process. This can make it difficult for medical innovators to compete for capital with innovators in other fields, such as telecommunications, where billion-dollar companies can be built in a year or two. This cost of capital could be reduced--and medical innovation spurred--by better mechanisms for sharing risks between medical R&D investors and outside capital markets. But the ultimate goal isn't to protect investors. Lowering the cost of capital for innovators would help accelerate the development of new medicines and devices that improve individual lives and ease the broader burdens of disease. The real beneficiaries would be the patients. This session will address new developments in financing medical innovation and discuss their potential for addressing better risk-sharing mechanisms. What instruments would enable such risk-sharing? Which hedgers or speculators would take the other side of these hedges? What would be the ultimate benefit to patients?
Moderators
Joel Kurtzman, Managing Senior Fellow, Milken Institute
Tomas Philipson, Senior Fellow, Milken Institute; Daniel Levin Professor of Public Policy Studies, Irving B Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Frank Luntz has helped presidents, prime ministers, and more than two dozen Fortune 500 CEOs from Washington to Wall Street to Hollywood find the right words to get people to buy, participate, and vote. With three New York Times best sellers in a row and current gigs on CBS and Fox News, Luntz is considered by many to be America's greatest wordsmith. He has conducted over 2,000 research projects in 29 countries -- always with a laser-like focus on crafting the words that work. In this presentation, Frank will unveil the 21 essential words for the 21st Century and the 15 key phrases for 2015.
Speaker
Frank Luntz, Founder and President, Luntz Global
9:30 am - 10:30 am
A young labor force, infrastructure enhancements and a growing middle class have positioned much of Southeast Asia for growth. Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Vietnam and Myanmar all stand to benefit as manufacturers expand outside of China to lower labor and production costs. Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines will also see an increase in middle class demand for imports such as cars and electronic devices, and for services related to health, education and leisure. As China slows, are these nations set to become Asia's next growth engine? What does the increased demand for pricey consumer goods and services mean for investors? And what can policymakers and political leaders do to bring their countries to the next level of development?
Moderator
Cecilia Ma Zecha, Executive Director, Forbes Asia
Speakers
Dino Patti Djalal, Founder, Foreign Policy Community of Indonesia
Richard Li, Chairman and CEO, Pacific Century Group
Kasemsit Pathomsak, President and CEO, Merchant Partners Securities Plc and Merchant Partners Asset Management Ltd.
Cesar Purisima, Secretary of Finance, Republic of the Philippines
Kirk Wagar, U.S. Ambassador to Singapore
9:30 am - 10:30 am
The choices Americans make about what to eat and drink are often unhealthy ones, contributing to an obesity rate of more than 33 percent. Lowering this rate and curbing its role in chronic disease are key to controlling rising health-care costs and improving quality of life. More Americans are becoming aware of this, and interest in a healthy diet is gaining momentum. Communities and organizations are addressing the time constraints that families face when it comes to improving their diets. "Food deserts" have become a matter of national concern. To serve this growing market, many food companies and restaurants are reshaping their product lines and menus. Corporations and investors are acquiring a taste for the profits produced by healthy food. Yet much more needs to be accomplished. This panel will discuss how America can make healthy food and drink accessible and affordable to all. Should it primarily be the responsibility of policymakers, communities, consumers or corporations? Is the solution more about raising awareness or proactively changing what's on store shelves?
Moderator
Jane Wells, Business News Reporter, CNBC
Speakers
Anu Chatterjee, Managing Economist, Milken Institute
William Dietz, Director, Sumner M. Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University
Jeffrey Dunn, President, Packaged Fresh, Campbell Soup Co.; Chief Carrot Officer, Bolthouse Farms
Michael O. Johnson, Chairman and CEO, Herbalife
Ryan Shadrick Wilson, Chief Strategy Officer and General Counsel, Partnership for a Healthier America
9:30 am - 10:30 am
While corporate philanthropy continues to decline, U.S. individuals gave an estimated $350 billion to nonprofits in 2014, roughly 2 percent of GDP. But is all this generosity effective? With 1.6 million nonprofit organizations in the U.S., how can scale and synergy be leveraged toward accomplishing meaningful goals? Burgeoning wealth in parts of the world where philanthropy is in its nascent stages is creating a new cadre of families with significant resources to target the issues and ideas they most care about. Is the U.S. an effective model to follow? How do large-scale philanthropists develop efficacy metrics for their giving and create decision trees about when to start--or stop--funding. Our panel of experts will discuss some of the successes and lessons from their own philanthropic journeys and the effective tools that can create systemic change.
Moderator
Richard Ditizio, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Milken Institute
Speakers
Folorunso Alakija, Group Managing Director, The Rose of Sharon Group; Executive Vice Chairman, Famfa Oil Ltd.
Sir Tom Hunter, Founder, Hunter Foundation; Founding Partner, West Coast Capital
Tsitsi Masiyiwa, Executive Chairperson, Higher Life Foundation
Adam Miller, Founder and CEO, Cornerstone OnDemand
9:30 am - 10:30 am
The economic impact of climate change can't be measured only in terms of dollars and cents. Rising temperatures will likely change the crops we grow, how much energy we use and our access to natural resources. Warming trends that may boost food production in cold climates will almost certainly take a toll on farming in temperate regions. Some businesses are investing now to reduce the effects of climate change. For example, Bloomberg LP is moving one of its computer centers from lower Manhattan to upstate New York because of increased flooding risk. For others, expenses have come in the form of higher regulatory costs. Compliance with the Clean Air Act will cost U.S. businesses $65 billion in 2020, up from $53 billion in 2010, according to government reports. When does increasing regulation start harming business and the economy, even if it does help clean the air? How will changes in temperature affect the supply food and energy? And how will living in a warmer world effect health costs? Panelists will discuss the economic consequences of climate change and the steps that can be taken now to mitigate them.
Moderator
Susan Goldberg, Editor in Chief, National Geographic Magazine and News
Speakers
Gérard Araud, French Ambassador to the United States
Aimée Christensen, CEO, Christensen Global Strategies; Executive Director, Sun Valley Institute for Resilience
John Cochrane, Professor of Finance, University of Chicago Booth School of Business; Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution
Mark Tercek, President and CEO, the Nature Conservancy
10:45 am - 11:45 am
The statistics are damning: only one in five low-income students attends a four-year college, compared with two-thirds of those from the wealthiest families. In fact, high-performing freshmen from low-income families are only half as likely to earn a bachelor's degree within six years as their counterparts in the top 25 percent of income distribution. In an era when a college degree is the best ticket to a good job and middle-class lifestyle, too many young adults are being locked out. Learning challenges that begin in elementary and secondary school continue to perplex in college. How can school districts address this conundrum? What independent resources are available to students and educators? Can collaborative strategies be scaled to address the issue on a national basis? Are universities and community colleges doing enough - or being effective enough - to not only encourage and enroll poor students, but provide effective support which results in graduation?
Moderator
Goldie Blumenstyk, Senior Writer, Chronicle of Higher Education; Author, "American Higher Education in Crisis? What Everyone Needs to Know"
Speakers
John Baker, CEO, D2L
Seth Bernstein, President, Pegasus Capital Advisors
Nicholas Dirks, Chancellor, University of California, Berkeley
George Weiss, Founder and Chairman, Say Yes to Education; CEO, Weiss Multi-Strategy Advisers LLC
10:45 am - 11:45 am
The democratization of philanthropy--put your Twitter following to work. Technology and the digital world have broken through the traditional barriers to participation that existed at the high-priced rubber-chicken fundraising dinners and galas. Now everyone can take part--activating and engaging new audiences, educating a broader public and increasing impact. Add a celebrity experience, a highly produced video, and you've got a campaign. What are traditional marketers learning from the success of these online campaigns, and how can you employ these same skills at the grassroots level to make a difference? How do you measure activation and social impact? And with so many more options and ways to engage, are we increasing the amount of money raised by philanthropy? Join us for a high-impact, interactive discussion.
Moderator
Michelle Kydd Lee, Chief Innovation Officer, CAA
Speakers
Stacey Boyd, Founder and CEO, Schoola
Ryan Cummins, Co-Founder and Co-CEO, Omaze
Adrian Grenier, Actor and Activist
Karina Kogan, Executive Vice President, Digital, Participant Media
Matt Pohlson, Co-Founder and Co-CEO, Omaze
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Institute Chairman Mike Milken moderates our annual look at the issues shaping the global credit markets. How are corporate bond markets responding to new capital-requirement rules for banks and dealers? What's the outlook for rates over the next year, and how are fixed income investors preparing? What are the opportunities in structured finance - including residential MBS, ABS (such as auto and aircraft finance) and CLOs - and what role is structured finance playing in the overall credit market landscape? What does the shifting global energy landscape mean for creditors? Will persistent concerns about the euro zone lead U.S. investors to turn off the spigot to European issuers, and are those investors finding opportunities in burgeoning economies in Africa, Asia and South America? Is the surge in leveraged covenant-lite loans an ominous sign of things to come? Are fixed income investors savvier today than they were during the crisis, and are credit ratings effectively keeping pace with changing markets?
Moderator
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Speakers
Richard Byrne, President, Benefit Street Partners, Providence Equity Partners
Thomas Finke, Chairman and CEO, Babson Capital Management
Michael Hintze, Founder, CEO and Senior Investment Officer, CQS
Steven Tananbaum, Managing Partner and Chief Investment Officer, GoldenTree Asset Management, LP
David Warren, CEO, Chief Investment Officer and Founding Partner, DW Partners, LP
10:45 am - 11:45 am
After more than a decade of war, thousands of military veterans, men and women who defended their countries, are returning to civilian life. The UK plans to reduce active-duty personnel by 100,000 over just a couple of years. The U.S. population of veterans also will rise through planned force reductions. These men and women leave the military with technical skills, maturity and self-discipline. Many are experienced leaders. They have learned how to plan, perform under pressure and respond swiftly to unforeseen problems. They also know how to work in diverse groups and settings to accomplish tasks on time, qualities that make them stellar employees. What can governments and businesses do to smooth veterans' transition to civilian life and capitalize on the value they bring to the workforce? Are veteran support networks adequate for the task? And what can be done to eliminate negative stereotypes that often shadow military veterans after their service ends.
Moderator
Christina Rivera, Executive Director, Honor Foundation
Speakers
William McNulty, Cofounder and CEO, Team Rubicon Global
Nick Parker, Former Commander in Chief, Land Forces, United Kingdom; Senior Associate Fellow, Royal United Services Institute
Maura Sullivan, Assistant Secretary, Office of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg, Chairman and Founder, Spitzberg Partners LLC; Former Minister of Defense and Former Minister of Economics and Technology, Germany
10:45 am - 11:45 am
This working session will convene global investors and business leaders focused on Africa to discuss capital market development, scaling up financing into infrastructure, and key projects and policies aimed at encouraging growth on the continent. Participants will include members of the President Barack Obama's Advisory Council on Doing Business in Africa for discussion on optimizing upcoming milestones, including the president's trip and the International Conference on Financing for Development in Addis Ababa, that will take place this summer.
10:45 am - 11:45 am
In this private meeting, current investors in Southeast Asia will discuss opportunities and challenges of investing in the region. The session will start with Philippines Finance Secretary Cesar Purisima sharing his insights into the economic and business landscapes in Southeast Asia. Purisima presides over one of Southeast Asia's fastest-growing economies -- one that is attracting increased investor interest. The wider group discussion will address investment opportunities in the 10 countries that form the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), which soon will be economically integrated, transforming the region into a unified, competitive market with labor, goods, investments and capital flowing freely among a population of 600 million. The session also will address how the region is being influenced by Japan, China and India.
Moderator
Heng Wing Chan, Chairman, Asia Center, Milken Institute
Speakers
Charon Wardini bin Mokhzani , Executive Director, Managing Director's Office, Khazanah Nasional Berhad, Malaysia; Managing Director, Khazanah Research Institute
Lawrence Ho, Co-Chairman and CEO, Melco Crown Entertainment Ltd.
Bhupendra Kumar Modi, Founder Chairman, Smart Global Group; Global Chairman, Spice Global
Cesar Purisima, Secretary of Finance, Republic of the Philippines
10:45 am - 11:45 am
DNA sequencing technology has advanced at an extraordinary pace since the Human Genome Project was completed in 2003. That first mapping of the genome took 13 years and cost $3 billion. Today, a human genome can be sequenced in less than three days at a cost of approximately $1,000. As a result, DNA sequencing is shifting from a tool used for scientific research to a key technology used in clinical medicine, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The company most responsible for driving this revolution in DNA sequencing technology is San Diego-based Illumina, whose revenue has grown from $367 million in 2007 to $1.8 billion in 2014 as demand for its products has exploded. In this panel, Ron Baron, founder and CIO of Baron Capital, will interview Jay Flatley, CEO of Illumina. Their discussion will provide members of the audience with a better understanding of Illumina's business, market opportunity and competitive advantages. They also will learn more about the promise of genomics and how it can improve human health.
Introduction By
Sarah Sandler, Director, Business and Program Development, Milken Institute
Moderator
Ron Baron, Founder, CEO and Chief Investment Officer, Baron Capital Group
Speaker
Jay Flatley, CEO, Illumina
10:45 am - 11:45 am

Moderator
Carl Meyer, Chief Investment Officer, Silver Rock Financial LLC
Speakers
Gregory Beard, Global Head of Natural Resources, Senior Partner, Apollo Global Management
Shaia Hosseinzadeh, Managing Director, WL Ross & Co. LLC
Lawrence Landry, Vice Chairman, Investment Banking, JP Morgan
John Raymond, Managing Partner and CEO, Energy & Minerals Group
John Wilder, Executive Chairman, Bluescape Resources
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Solving a problem, filling a niche, creating an alternative universe or a community--these are the things that drive the innovators and disruptors who are changing the world. They bring all that they do, and have done, to the creative process. And they place a high value on the people--the human capital--in their lives. On this panel, artists and innovators will talk about the convergence of creativity and technology, and the values that inform their work. They can fill a stadium or interact with millions of people a day. How do they manage that power responsibly? How do they build long-term, interactive relationships and stay true to their brands? Taking it to scale, how big and how fast can you grow and still remain true to the values and passion that inspired you?
Moderator
Andy Serwer, Editor in Chief, Yahoo Finance
Speakers
Brandon Beck, Co-Founder and CEO, Riot Games
Brad Delson, Musician, Linkin Park; Co-Founder, Machine Shop Ventures
Dave Gilboa, Co-Founder and Co-CEO, Warby Parker
Payal Kadakia, CEO and Co-Founder, ClassPass
Mike Shinoda, Musician, Linkin Park; Co-Founder, Machine Shop Ventures
10:45 am - 11:45 am
First there were 60/40 portfolios, then tactical asset allocation, then risk parity. Now, more powerful, Big Data-driven analytics have put risk factor strategies in the spotlight. Many investors are on a quest for a higher level of portfolio diversification and efficiency, having lived through the financial meltdown and become finely attuned to the perils of correlation among seemingly unrelated asset classes. The expert investors on this panel will discuss the tools and methods they use to address risk and volatility across global markets and how they see each of them fitting into the larger picture. Are alternative investments bringing the benefits they expected? What are the roles of private equity and hedge funds in the evolving landscape? What's the best bet for capital preservation, consistency and outperformance in 2015 and beyond?
Moderator
Jennifer Urdan, Managing Director, Cambridge Associates
Speakers
Jane Buchan, CEO, PAAMCO; Director and Chair, Chartered Alternative Investment Analyst Association
Hua Fan, Senior Managing Director, Head of Fixed-Income and Absolute-Return Investment, China Investment Corp.
Tim Haywood, Investment Director, GAM
Brian Pellegrino, Chief Investment Officer, United Parcel Service, Inc.
Stephen Toy, Senior Managing Director and Co-Head, WL Ross & Co. LLC
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Investment in financial technology, or FinTech, is exploding as disruptions take hold in one of the last great holdouts of the digital revolution, the finance industry. Innovative services and products are changing the way we pay, invest and borrow. These new methods of doing business present a challenge to incumbent service providers. Investment in FinTech companies rose more than 200 percent in 2014 - a figure that dramatically overshadows the 63 percent overall growth rate in venture capital investments made last year. What's driving this momentum, and can it be sustained? More important, which innovations are going to change the world and which are overhyped? Join this session to hear leading venture capitalists active in FinTech share their views.
Moderator
Brian Knight, Associate Director, Center for Financial Markets, Milken Institute
Speakers
Robert Antoniades, Co-Founder and General Partner, Information Venture Partners
Debby Hopkins, Chief Innovation Officer, Citi; CEO, Citi Ventures
Arjan Schütte, Founder and Managing Partner, Core Innovation Capital
Igor Tulchinsky, Founder and CEO, WorldQuant LLC
Phin Upham, Principal, Thiel Capital
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Mexico and the United States have long been key trading partners, a relationship cemented by the North American Free Trade Agreement. Since that pact was signed, however, and especially in the last five years, Mexico has transformed itself into a leading manufacturer, global trader, and international investor. Our southern neighbor has diversified far beyond agriculture and oil, climbing the industrial food chain into electronics, aerospace and automobiles. Some Mexican firms have acquired companies in other countries, including the U.S. Yet Mexico's well-known troubles remain unsolved, particularly the chronic instability along the border and an unbalanced pattern of regional development. Our panel will explore the close commercial ties between our nations, Mexico's increasing economic power and how it can bring broader prosperity to its people.
Moderator
León Krauze, Anchor, Univision KMEX, Los Angeles
Speakers
Alberto Gómez Alcalá, Executive Director, Institutional Development, Economic Research and Communication, Grupo Financiero, Banamex-Citigroup; Executive President, Mexican Banking Assn.
Marcela Meirelles, Managing Director, Emerging Markets Sovereign Research, TCW
Enrique Perret, Regional Director for North America, ProMéxico
Jaana Remes, Economist and Partner, McKinsey Global Institute
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Events of the past year suggest the world is sinking deeper into turmoil. Religious extremists are literally gaining ground in the Middle East and Africa, and Russia backs Ukrainian rebels in defiance of Western sanctions. Once-stable nations, including Syria and Libya, have become "failed states" ruled by extremists and militias and others, such as Yemen and Iraq, appear to be on the brink. In Asia, China, Japan and the Philippines have rattled sabers over a few uninhabited islands. These events challenge the assumption that a globalized economy, and the prosperity that it promises, can make us safer by minimizing our differences. They also raise serious questions for political and military leaders. How do we rein in nation provocateurs such as Russia, Iran and North Korea? What is the role of the U.S., the world's superpower? Has it abdicated its responsibilities as the world's policeman, or do we need a coalition of developed countries to band together to fight the spread of dysfunction and disorder? Is the developed world willing to bear the cost in lives and money that the fight will require?
Moderator
Niall Ferguson, Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History, Harvard University; Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University
Speakers
Shaukat Aziz, Former Prime Minister, Pakistan
Vicente Fox, Former President, Mexico
David Miliband, President and CEO, International Rescue Committee; Former Foreign Secretary, United Kingdom
Matthew Spence, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Middle East Policy
10:45 am - 11:45 am
They are extraordinary women--groundbreakers, self-starters and dynamic leaders who have influenced and harnessed the power of media, technology and entertainment to build brands and companies. Smart and strategic, they have employed incredible entrepreneurial acumen to succeed in the marketplace, building their own successful brands while directing multi-faceted lives. On this panel, these women will talk about the secrets to establishing a market niche, raising capital and staying competitive, as well as investment opportunities. They'll discuss the challenges to building and managing careers in a business landscape where the decision makers are mostly men. And they'll answer the question: What are they doing to pave the way for the next generation of young women? Join us for a conversation with these influential business leaders making a mark on the world.
Moderator
Joyce Chang, Editor in Chief, Self
Speakers
Maha Dakhil, Agent, CAA
Minka Kelly, Actress; Partner, fashionABLE
Melody McCloskey , Co-Founder and CEO, StyleSeat
Pooneh Mohajer , Co-Founder and CEO, tokidoki
Robyn Ward, Head, New Media Ventures, United Talent Agency
11:15 am - 12:30 pm

Speakers
Nancy Ozeas, Senior Advisor, Milken Institute
Genevieve Roth, Senior Director of Special Projects, Glamour magazine
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Better opportunities for women will lead to greater economic development and improved global security. Efforts to realize this still untapped potential are advancing in projects that range from educating girls and breaking the cycle of poverty to preventing gender-based violence and eliminating health-care disparities. Whether originating from NGOs and government institutions or startups, cross-border investment and philanthropy, sustainable opportunity, access to capital and skills development are crucial. They not only help liberate women but can transform social structures and stabilize societies. Tech-savvy entrepreneurs are lending their know-how in the developing world and corporations are stepping up to serve as partners in these efforts. The time for pay equity is now and the business community is making the economic argument for more diversity in C-suites and on boards. Our special guests will explore the numerous ways we can create a better world for women and girls and, in the process, build a better world for all.
Host
Willow Bay, Director and Professor, USC Annenberg School of Journalism
Speakers
Folorunso Alakija, Group Managing Director, The Rose of Sharon Group; Executive Vice Chairman, Famfa Oil Ltd.
Patricia Arquette, Actress and Equal Pay Advocate
Princess Reema bint Bandar al Saud of Saudi Arabia, Founder and CEO, Alf Khair
Deborah Birx, U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator and Special Representative for Global Health Diplomacy, Department of State
Cherie Blair, Founder, Cherie Blair Foundation for Women
Barbara Bush, CEO and Co-Founder, Global Health Corps
Holly Gordon, Co-Founder and CEO, Girl Rising
H.E. Paul Kagame , President, Republic of Rwanda
Susan McCaw, President, COM Investments; Former U.S. Ambassador to Austria; Founding Board Member, Malala Fund
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Precious Moloi-Motsepe , Founder and Executive Chairperson, African Fashion International; Co-Founder and Vice Chairperson, Motsepe Foundation
Helena Morrissey, CEO, Newton; Founder, 30% Club
Freida Pinto, Actress; Producer, "Girl Rising India"
Suna Said, Founder and CEO, Nima Capital LLC
Shiza Shahid, Co-Founder, Malala Fund
Diana Taylor, Vice Chairman, Solera
Howard Taylor, Vice President & Managing Director, Nike Foundation
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Speakers
Steve Burd, Founder and CEO, Burd Health; Former Chairman and CEO, Safeway Inc.
Wei-Li Chong, Executive Vice President, People and Family Experience, Knowledge Universe U.S.
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
High-profile cyber-attacks of banks, retailers and health care providers demonstrate how vulnerable businesses and their customers are to hackers. The efficiency of electronic data networks is beyond question. But they also have created new security concerns. In the business world, companies risk losing sales if consumers aren't satisfied that confidential information is safe. Cyber-security also is critical to government efforts to monitor the communications and movements of terror organizations. How can the government and private business work together to protect privacy and keep the nation safe from attack? How can we balance security concerns with the need for data to move freely between businesses and their customers? This panel will discuss the threats that lurk in cyberspace and steps that are being taken to counter them.
Moderator
Eli Sugarman, Program Officer, Cyber Initiative, William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
Speakers
Susan Gilchrist, Group CEO, Brunswick Group LLC
Ray Rothrock, Chairman and CEO, RedSeal; Partner Emeritus, Venrock
Suzanne Spaulding , Under Secretary, National Protection and Programs Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security
Alex Stamos, Chief Information Security Officer and Vice President, Information Security, Yahoo
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
The role of the chief marketing officer is no longer just about marketing. More than ever, CMOs must be myopic about the consumer, fanatical about innovation and exert strong leadership in the C-suite. Increasingly, the chief marketer's job is defined by the digital media that consumers rely on to research and buy products, and by a global marketplace that requires an awareness of many cultures. In this fast-changing environment, how can marketers effectively take their companies to the next level? How do they protect their brands and corporate image when a blog post or tweet can set off a global reaction? What impact is this evolving consumer landscape having on brands and their reach?
Moderator
Cecilia Arradaza , Executive Director, Communications, Milken Institute
Speakers
Beth Brady, Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer, Principal Financial Group
Matt Derella, Vice President, U.S. Sales, Twitter
Hannah Grove, Chief Marketing Officer, State Street
Mark Wilson, Chief Evangelist, BlackBerry
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Technology is driving financial inclusion by enabling populations who have traditionally been excluded from formal financial services to gain access. All over the world, the use of mobile networks and micropayments is helping the underbanked in emerging and developed countries store and transfer money. Traditionally, the need for costly infrastructure and a highly developed regulatory environment has put bank services beyond the reach of millions. Now, technology is changing the equation. But how will this dramatic expansion of services to an underserved market influence the broader economy? Are there threats that might derail this revolution? And what is the next frontier of expanding financial access? Our panel of innovators will discuss how technology is making the world of finance a more inclusive place.
Moderator
Chris Brummer, Senior Fellow, Milken Institute Center for Financial Markets; Professor, Georgetown University
Speakers
Bill Barhydt, Founder and CEO, Abra; Chairman, Boom Financial
Bob Collymore, CEO, Safaricom Ltd.
Chris Larsen, CEO and Co-Founder, Ripple Labs
Shamina Singh, Executive Director, MasterCard Center for Inclusive Growth
David Thompson, Chief Information Officer and Executive Vice President, Global Operations and Technology, Western Union
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Cities around the globe are experiencing unprecedented growth as people seek employment and strive to elevate their quality of life. Urban centers are hotbeds for wealth creation and innovation in numerous fields, and their inhabitants are often better educated, more creative and happier than those who live in less dense locales. However, cities are also complex spaces that can be overwhelmed by uncontrolled population growth and deteriorating infrastructure, leading to expanding slums, marginalization and crime. This panel will explore how the world's great and soon-to-be-great cities can stay flexible in the face of change and maintain vibrant, livable communities. What are planners, architects and government officials doing to solve pressing urban challenges, such as affordable housing and efficient, high-capacity transportation? How can they, and others with good ideas, design metropolises that are conducive to economic vitality, environmental sustainability, social inclusiveness and creativity--the strengths that will enable these population magnets to thrive in the future?
Moderator
Ross DeVol, Chief Research Officer, Milken Institute
Speakers
Claire Cockerton, CEO, Innovate Finance; Chairwoman, Entiq
Andy Cohen, Co-CEO, Gensler
Ned Curic, Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, Toyota
Shirley Franklin, CEO, Purpose Built Communities; Former Mayor, Atlanta
Perry Wong, Managing Director, Research, Milken Institute
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
When investors bunch countries together with labels like BRIC, it often obscures the subtle differences in national economies such as trade exposure to the U.S., Europe, Japan and China. Prospective advances in the rule of law, more established capital markets, currency reserves and trade balances are not progressing in lockstep. Yet uncertainties remain. How will different EMs fare in a world of Federal Reserve tapering? How will the Chinese slowdown and falling commodity prices affect Asia, Africa and Latin America? Can they restore momentum in the face of quantitative easing in Japan and the euro zone?
Moderator
Brigitte Posch, Head of Emerging Markets Corporate Debt, Babson Capital Management
Speakers
Ana María Carrasquilla, Chairman and Executive President, Fondo Latinoamericano de Reservas
Victor Chu, Chairman, First Eastern Investment Group
Bob Diamond, Founder and CEO, Atlas Merchant Capital
Penelope Foley, Group Managing Director, Emerging Markets, TCW
Jingdong Hua, Vice President, Treasury and Syndications, International Finance Corp.
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
The Trans-Pacific Partnership promises to expand trade among the U.S., Japan, Australia and nine other Pacific Rim countries by making it easier for money and goods to flow across national borders. Yet to many, the proposed free-trade pact merely highlights a broader acceleration of commerce that has lowered the cost of high-end products such as electronics and fostered a growing middle class in emerging countries of Asia and Latin America. Strong economic and cultural ties justify the question, is the "Pacific Future" upon us? Join our panelists for a conversation about the potential and challenges posed by the growing interdependence among Pacific-facing nations.
Moderator
Kevin Klowden, Managing Director, California Center, and Managing Economist, Milken Institute
Speakers
David Dreier, Chairman, Annenberg-Dreier Commission; Former U.S. Congressman, California
Ashok Kumar Mirpuri, Ambassador to the United States, Singapore
Dominic Ng, Chairman and CEO, East West Bank
Stefan Selig, Undersecretary for International Trade; Executive Director, President’s Export Council
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
This private session will convene active-duty service members from our Military Leadership Circle, prominent veterans who successfully transitioned into the workplace and executives from companies that actively support veteran reintegration. Participants will share stories and discuss solutions to help those who have served nations on the frontlines support economic growth in their communities by taking leadership positions at top employers.
Moderator
Rye Barcott, Co-Founder and Managing Partner, Double Time Capital; Author, "It Happened on the Way to War"
Speakers
Matt Driskill, Lieutenant Commander and Operations Officer, Electronic Attack Squadron 129, U.S. Navy
Charles F. Kalmbach, Chairman, Team Rubicon Global
William McNulty, Cofounder and CEO, Team Rubicon Global
Christopher Perkins, Managing Director and Global Head of OTC Clearing, Citi
Maura Sullivan, Assistant Secretary, Office of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
Eli Williamson, Director, Veterans Program, Robert R. McCormick Foundation
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Optimal capital structure is a moving target. It's unique to each company and depends on capital market conditions, the economy, management capabilities, industry trends and--most importantly--the regulatory environment and social trends. Getting these wrong can have significant consequences. Overleveraging can leave a company hamstrung, just as avoiding debt at the wrong times can lead to missed opportunities for growth and job creation. For some companies, the constant focus on short-term financing leaves less time for long-term planning. Finding the right capital structure is both an art and a science, and the best practitioners understand their environment and draw from a broad range of financial tools. This panel will discuss why capital structure matters now more than ever. How are risk levels affected by current government regulation and social trends? When is it time to build liquidity? How can companies anticipate interest-rate and market cycles to avoid the wrong structure?
Moderator
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Speakers
Mark Attanasio, Co-Founder and Managing Partner, Crescent Capital Group LP
Emanuel Friedman, CEO, EJF Capital
Mitchell Julis, Co-Founder, Co-Chairman and Co-CEO, Canyon Partners, LLC
Jonathan Sokoloff, Managing Partner, Leonard Green & Partners
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
The workplace is changing for employees and managers alike. The disruptions of technology and outsourcing appear to signal the end of long careers with a single company or in a particular field of expertise. Increasingly, companies are embracing the concept of "on demand" talent and learning -- the use of temporary contractors and outside expertise to meet the fluctuating needs of the workplace. In this fluid environment, what matters most to the 21st century job seeker and employers, specific skill sets or the ability to learn quickly and adapt? How will new, data-based screening technologies change hiring? What strategies must executives develop to successfully prepare themselves and their companies to compete successfully, keep learning and stay innovative.
Moderator
Jody Miller, Founder and CEO, Business Talent Group
Speakers
Jon Bischke, Co-Founder and CEO, Entelo
Peter Grauer, Chairman, Bloomberg LP; Founding U.S. Chair, 30% Club
Diana O'Brien, Chief Marketing Officer, Deloitte LLP
Alexander Saint-Amand, CEO, GLG
Beth Steinberg, Senior Vice President, People, BrightRoll
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Over the course of just a few generations, life spans have doubled, dramatically changing the demographic landscape for countries, companies and customers. While population aging brings its challenges, an understanding of the opportunities of longer lives is emerging. A longevity economy is growing as markets recognize the demand for products and services geared toward older adults. Traditional retirement is being questioned. Innovations in medicine and technology present prospects for longer and healthier lives for generations to come. The consequences of the age shift for the current cohort of older adults and those that serve them are upon us. But imagine how increasing longevity will change things for millennials and generations that follow? This will be an intergenerational conversation that will change your thinking about the future of the United States and aging societies around the world.
Moderator
Paul Irving, Chairman, Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging; Distinguished Scholar in Residence, University of Southern California Davis School of Gerontology
Speakers
Roger Crandall, Chairman, President and CEO, Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co.
Thomas Finke, Chairman and CEO, Babson Capital Management
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Now that the media euphoria from Flash Boys has died down and the pillars of U.S. equity markets are no longer being called into question, constructive conversations about addressing market fairness and inefficiencies have begun to take shape. With the SEC canvassing a wide swath of stakeholders through its new private sector market structure committee, what lessons can be taken from countries like Canada, Australia and those in Europe? What is the impact of proposals from retail market makers, exchanges and investors and how will their interests be balanced? What do those proposals mean for "ma and pa" and institutional investors seeking liquidity and timely, inexpensive trade execution? Now that algorithms and machines dominate trading, is a complete overhaul needed, or can equity markets continue to evolve? This panel will examine the likely costs and benefits of the different market reforms being considered.
Moderator
Sayena Mostowfi, Principal, Head of U.S. Equities Research, TABB Group
Speakers
Kevan Cowan, President, TSX Markets; Group Head of Equities, TMX Group
Stephen McCauley, Head of Research, Winton
Seth Merrin, Founder and CEO, Liquidnet Holdings, Inc.
Jamil Nazarali, Senior Managing Director and Head of Execution Services, Citadel Securities
Jatin Suryawanshi, Head, Global Quantitative Strategy, Jefferies
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
How can we harness the power of business and develop investment strategies that drive reform and make the economic case to end unfair and unequal labor practices, such as modern slavery? Leading CEOs, government, nonprofit and religious leaders, including the Vatican, are developing tactical alliances to stop illegal and inhumane employment practices and create programs to improve the lives of workers around the world. Come hear from leaders who will discuss the challenges in addressing modern slavery in companies and the business rationale for doing so, the development of a replacement economy, and lessons from building sustainable supply chains that empower communities, often with a focus on women and families. By investing in operational performance and putting a proper value on human capital, the market and investors can help drive solutions. How can we make better use of modern technologies to empower companies and consumers to make informed decisions about the products they buy? Please join us for a conversation about solutions, collaboration, best practices and incentives to bring employers to the table to transform the way business is done.
Moderator
Jim Pitofsky, Managing Director, Strategic Alliances, John Templeton Foundation
Speakers
Jean Baderschneider, CEO, Global Fund to End Slavery
Justin Dillon, CEO, Made in a Free World
Federica Marchionni, CEO, Lands’ End
Chris McGrath, Vice President, Global Public Affairs, Sustainability and Well-Being, Mondelēz International
Julia Ormond, Actress; Founder and President, Advancing Systemic Solutions to End Enslavement and Trafficking
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Pulitzer Prize winning journalists Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn aren't content to tell us that we should help the downtrodden. Their focus is on why and how. Even small contributions of time and money matter. And technology and social media make it easier than ever for givers to decide which charities and social enterprises make the best use of donations. Kristof, a New York Times columnist, and WuDunn, a banker and former Times business editor, understand the problem from first-hand observation and experience covering those trapped in misery and the people who have made a difference. Join them as they discuss their book, "A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity" and describe the opportunities that exist to improve the lives of others. Following the session, Kristof and WuDunn will sign copies of their book for the audience.
Moderator
Steve Grove, Director, News Lab, Google
Speakers
Nicholas Kristof, Columnist, New York Times
Sheryl WuDunn, Co-Founder, FullSky Capital; Co-Author, “China Wakes” and “A Path Appears”
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
The globalization of financial flows has slowed in recent years and is potentially at risk due to increased banking and other regulation in G-7 countries and potential interest-rate increases in the U.S. If this continues, it could have significant deleterious effects on frontier markets. For developing countries, participation in global financial markets is critical to longer term growth and development. Portfolio flows finance corporate and sovereign balance sheets; foreign direct investment is important for growth, jobs, and skills transfer; and trade finance is fundamental to export-led growth strategies. At the same time, though, openness in financial markets can exacerbate macroeconomic volatility, increase sovereign balance-sheet risk, and thwart monetary policy independence. Today, it is those risks--and the potential for global pullback--that are top of mind for policymakers and investors. This roundtable will explore the current state, and near-term predictions, for EM capital flows and their impact on frontier markets. Participants will consider how the regulatory environment is effecting cross-border investment and trade finance and explore ways that frontier-market policies can take advantage of the opportunities while managing the risks.
Moderator
Staci Warden, Executive Director, Center for Financial Markets, Milken Institute
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
An improving U.S. economy, continued low interest rates and thousands of companies sitting on piles of cash provide an abundance of fuel for an upsurge in mergers and acquisitions. In 2014, global deal-making volume was up 47 percent over the previous year, and the momentum appears to be continuing in 2015. In addition, the flourishing activist investor movement is helping to shape some of the trends in the M&A landscape and is playing an increasingly important role in influencing board rooms around the world. But risks still lurk, including economic and political uncertainty in Europe and a slowing China which are having knock-on effects for the rest of the global economy. Join us as this panel of M&A experts share their insight on the outlook for M&A, including a focus on specific industries (such as energy, biopharma and technology) where the deal-making is hottest and where investors are shaking things up the most in corporate board rooms.
Moderator
Stuart Cable, Partner, Goodwin Procter
Speakers
Steve Krouskos, Deputy Global Vice Chair, Transaction Advisory Services, EY
Raymond McGuire, Global Head, Corporate and Investment Banking, Citi
Peter Schoenfeld, Founder, CEO and Chief Investment Officer, P. Schoenfeld Asset Management, LP
David Solomon, Co-Head, Investment Banking Division, Goldman Sachs
Leon Wagner, Chairman and CEO, LWPartners
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
An unprecedented pace of research is driving new treatment approaches for patients with melanoma, lung, and blood cancers as well as chronic diseases like cystic fibrosis and diabetes. Personalized medicine, molecularly targeted drugs and immunotherapies are yielding better outcomes. Even the most cautious researchers and physicians are starting to use the word "cure" in some situations. But access to innovation can be limited. The cost to create these breakthrough drugs threatens to break the innovators who develop them as well as the entities that pick up the tab. How are new medicines integrated into standard-of-care to ensure all patients have equal access to the most promising treatments? What are the barriers and what do they mean for patients and their doctors? This panel will discuss the challenge and also consider ways that next-generation science and innovative policies can be leveraged to make the best treatments available to patients.
Moderator
Louise M. Perkins, Chief Science Officer, Melanoma Research Alliance
Speakers
Gideon Bollag, CEO, Plexxikon
Wyatt Decker, Vice President, Mayo Clinic; CEO, Mayo Clinic, Arizona
Jill DeSimone, Senior Vice President, U.S. Oncology, Merck
Omid Hamid, Director, Melanoma Center, and Chief, Translational Research and Immune-Oncology, the Angeles Clinic and Research Institute
Daniel Hilferty, President and CEO, Independence Blue Cross
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Rising global debt is raising concern among economists who fear a reversal of gains made since the Great Recession. Since 2008, leverage and risk-taking in the U.S. and UK dropped in some sectors including households, but government and corporate borrowing increased. Cumulatively, world-wide debt has risen across the board, particularly in parts of the euro-zone and in emerging market economies. Debt can play a positive role and increasing levels reflect deepening access to capital. At the same time, too much debt weakens balance sheets and financial resilience, and encourages the misallocation of resources. But how much debt is too much and where do we stand today?
Moderator
Felix Salmon, Senior Editor, Fusion
Speakers
Peter Budko, Executive Vice President and Chief Investment Officer, AR Capital
Damian Lillicrap, Head, Investment Strategy, QSuper
Nouriel Roubini, Chairman, Roubini Global Economics; Professor of Economics, Stern School of Business, New York University
Gene Sperling, President, Sperling Economic Strategies; Former National Economic Advisor to Presidents Obama and Clinton
Andrew Whittaker , Vice Chairman, Jefferies; Vice Chairman, Leucadia National Corp.
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

Host
Joel Kurtzman, Managing Senior Fellow, Milken Institute
Speaker
T. Boone Pickens, Entrepreneur and Philanthropist; Founder, BP Capital
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
In this private meeting, current investors in India will discuss opportunities and challenges of investing in the country and share insights into the economic and business landscapes of India. The discussion will address investment opportunities as well as reforms that are underway. These include revisions to foreign direct investment, the Land Acquisition Bill, the coal and power sector, direct transfer subsidies and streamlined tax regimes. Can India live up to its potential and become the fastest-growing economy by 2016? Will Modi succeed in breaking the hold of Indian bureaucracy and make investment returns more predictable?
Moderator
Komal Sri-Kumar, Senior Fellow, Milken Institute; President, Sri-Kumar Global Strategies, Inc.
Speakers
Pratik Agarwal, Founder and Director of Infrastructure, Vedanta Group
Yash Gupta, Senior Managing Director and Country Head, Hines India
Sumant Mandal, Managing Director, March Capital Partners
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
These days, kids aren't the only disruptors in the classroom. The potential for disruptive business models in education technology has captured the interest investors. Venture and equity financing soared to nearly $2 billion in 2014, up 55 percent year over year. At least one research firm predicts the online education market will be worth $107 billion by 2015. Larger, more traditional VC firms are stepping up their investments. The products vary from online curricula to educational gaming to tools for teachers and administrators. Yet, many of these education companies are still trying to demonstrate product efficacy and convince school districts to adopt their products; to say nothing of turning a profit. Our panel will discuss this two-part goal: Helping close the learning gap--and making a profit.
Moderator
Betsy Corcoran, CEO and Co-Founder, EdSurge
Speakers
Mitch Benson, Vice President, K-12 Education, Instructure
Shauntel Poulson, Partner, NewSchools Venture Fund
Susan Wolford, Managing Director and Head of Business Services, BMO Capital Markets
Jason Young, Co-Founder and CEO, MindBlown Labs
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Central bankers and other policy makers have never been in such uncharted waters. With a few exceptions, economies around the world are experiencing deflation driven by cheap oil, anemic growth and plummeting commodity prices. In response, Europe and Japan continue aggressive quantitative easing, and the ECB and several other European central banks have gone so far as to implement negative policy rates, which are unprecedented in the history of monetary policy. Loose policy is creating currency depreciation in Europe, Japan and many emerging markets, improving export competitiveness but putting debt profiles at significant risk and challenging policy makers on long delayed structural reforms. Dollar appreciation also puts at risk the twin engines for global recovery: the U.S. and China. This limits the Fed's room for maneuver as it seeks to weigh falling unemployment, wage growth and asset price inflation against global deflationary tendencies. How do investors view the global monetary policy environment? How and how much will aggressive QE help the nascent recovery in Europe? Will the Fed raise rates in the fall, and if so, what will be the impact on emerging markets? This panel of experts will help us navigate through these issues.
Moderator
Brian Sullivan, Anchor, CNBC
Speakers
Seth Carpenter, Acting Assistant Secretary for Financial Markets, Department of the Treasury
Dimitri Demekas, Assistant Director, Monetary and Capital Markets Department, International Monetary Fund
Scott Minerd, Chairman of Investments and Global Chief Investment Officer, Guggenheim Partners
Tad Rivelle, Group Managing Director and Chief Investment Officer, Fixed Income, TCW
Paul Sheard, Chief Global Economist and Head of Global Economics and Research, Standard & Poor's Ratings Services
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Ubiquitous technology, the aftermath of the great recession and rapidly changing demographics are transforming all aspects of economic life. As customers become more comfortable with technology, businesses across all sectors are being forced to change to meet increasingly digital demands. Digital transactions are becoming more commonplace and the innovations already occurring in finance are dramatically reshaping how consumers transact, share information, invest and save. To what extent traditional processes and players will be affected by the up-and-coming economic powerhouse remains to be seen, but the shift in demands and attitudes from generational change has opened up opportunities for new players who are able to satisfy those demands while upending traditional precepts.
Moderator
Leena Rao, Senior Writer, Fortune
Speakers
Greg Baxter, Global Head of Digital, Citi
Mike Cagney, Co-Founder and CEO, Social Finance
Rebecca Lynn, Co-founder and General Partner, Canvas Venture Fund
Adam Nash, President and CEO, Wealthfront
Dan Quan, Senior Advisor to the Director, U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Slowing growth and a government crackdown on corruption are roiling political undercurrents in China. Slower growth may be necessary to reduce the country's debt dependency and address environmental pollution. But will the slowdown lead to greater productivity or a hard landing? Will unemployment rise as share prices diminish? Concurrently, China's leaders are trying to address egregious corruption in business and government. But some worry that the anti-corruption drive is a pretext to dismantle opposing factions and secure President Xi Jinping's legacy and political longevity. What does this portend in a country where political power emanates from internal appointments rather than free elections? Will the contest among factions disrupt China's economic and political balance? Can China rekindle growth and achieve greater influence?
Moderator
Heng Wing Chan, Chairman, Asia Center, Milken Institute
Speakers
Jiming Ha, Vice Chairman and Chief Investment Strategist, Private Wealth Management China, Goldman Sachs
Shan Huang, Associate Managing Editor, Caixin Weekly; Editorial Board Member, Caixin Media
Minxin Pei, Professor of Government, Director of Keck Center for International and Strategic Studies, Claremont McKenna College
Lifen Zhang, Honorary Founding Editor, FTChinese.com, Financial Times
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
With 10,000 baby boomers turning 65 every day in the United States, investors and business leaders are recognizing the extraordinary potential of the longevity economy. From North America and Europe to Asia and Latin America, lower birth rates and longer life spans are changing the way we live. This massive demographic shift means new markets for innovative products and services. From health technologies and autonomous cars to financial services and fashion, the emerging population of older consumers will reward the inventive. What are the big ideas for business? Who will be the winners - and who will lose? This panel of thought leaders will reveal the possibilities for older adults - and for those savvy enough to appreciate the opportunity they represent.
Moderator
Jody Holtzman, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
Speakers
Gretchen Addi, Associate Partner and Business Lead, IDEO
Joseph Coughlin, Director, Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab
Paul Irving, Chairman, Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging; Distinguished Scholar in Residence, University of Southern California Davis School of Gerontology
Lisa Suennen, Managing Partner, Venture Valkyrie Consulting
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
For centuries, people have worried that new technologies will destroy jobs without creating enough new ones, and every time the doomsayers have been proven wrong. But today, with disruptive advances occurring at dizzying speed, some worry that the time may finally have come when more jobs are destroyed by technology than are created. One 2013 report by Oxford University researchers concluded that 47 percent of U.S. jobs are threatened by automation. Should workers be worried, or is the fear overblown? Is technology - from robots to intelligent digital agents - our friend or a threat? If the latter, what do we need to do to ensure employment by the middle class and others? How can we reorganize our business and economic system to avert more economic turmoil?
Moderator
Josh Barro, Correspondent, New York Times
Speakers
James Bradford DeLong, Professor of Economics, University of California, Berkeley
Jeremy Howard, CEO, Enlitic
Gerald Huff, Principal Software Engineer, Tesla Motors
Amy Webb, Digital Media Futurist; Founder, Webbmedia Group
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
For fast-growing technology companies, access to talent is a bigger problem than access to capital. Finding employees with strong backgrounds in the STEM fields--science, technology, engineering and math--is a primary concern for CEOs and investors. Technology's talent crisis includes the need to increase the presence of women and under-represented minorities in the tech workforce. This panel will address the problems, the opportunities and the strategies that nonprofit and for-profit organizations are putting in place to create a solution for the next century.
Moderator
Lesa Mitchell, Senior Advisor, Milken Institute; Founder, Network for Scale
Speakers
Byron Auguste, Managing Director, Opportunity@Work
Freada Kapor Klein, Partner, Kapor Capital; Partner, Kapor Center for Social Impact
Jackie Reses, Chief Development Officer, Yahoo
Jamal Simmons, Co-Founder, CRVIII.com; Principal, Raben Group
Hope Taitz, Managing Partner, ELY Capital
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
To view a live stream of the lunch plenaries, go to www.globalconference.org.

The media tend to highlight the lowlights of events in Africa, such as terrorism, the recent Ebola outbreak and volatility in oil and gas prices. Yet people involved in the African economy recognize the important gains that are improving its long-term outlook. South of the Sahara, foreign direct investment has risen sixfold since 2000, and the population is leapfrogging to new technologies such as mobile banking. Many African nations are positioned for dramatic economic growth, with expanding consumer markets. Regional cooperation is markedly improving and new infrastructure and technology are being put into place. This panel will bring together African heads of state, business leaders and global investors to discuss the vast continent's role in the world economy, strategies for accelerating progress and emerging investment opportunities.
Introduction By
Mindy Silverstein, Managing Director, Milken Institute
Moderator
Bronwyn Nielsen, Group Executive Director, ABN Group; Editor in Chief, CNBC Africa
Speakers
Tony Blair, Former Prime Minister, Great Britain and Northern Ireland
H.E. Paul Kagame , President, Republic of Rwanda
Scott Minerd, Chairman of Investments and Global Chief Investment Officer, Guggenheim Partners
Patrice Motsepe, Founder and Executive Chairman, African Rainbow Minerals
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Hosted by the Case Foundation and Omidyar Network
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Welcoming Remarks
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Katie O'Reilly, Executive Director, Business and Program Development, Milken Institute
Moderator
Maria Bartiromo, Anchor and Global Markets Editor, Fox Business Network
Entrepreneurs
Massy Arias, Founder, Massy Arias Fitness
Amy Lombardo, Head of Yoga Outreach, SmartMat
Holly Thaggard, CEO and Founder, Supergoop!
Shirley Velasquez , Director of Content, Latina Media Ventures
Katie Warner Johnson, Co-Founder and CEO, Carbon38
Speakers
Molly Ashby, Founder and CEO, Solera
Christine Driessen, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, ESPN
Payal Kadakia, CEO and Co-Founder, ClassPass
Tara VanDerveer , Setsuko Ishiyama Director, Women's Basketball, Stanford University
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Join us at an exclusive evening in Beverly Hills for Milken Institute Global Conference guests. The elite shoppers' paradise that is home to 27 luxury boutiques at Two Rodeo Drive and the Beverly Hills Conference and Visitors Bureau are showcasing the best of the city while providing guests the opportunity to shop, drink fine wine and network. International winemakers are going to pour their highest-rated wines inside each boutique. Enjoy thoughtfully chosen appetizers while you take in the unique atmosphere on world famous Rodeo Drive. Natasha MacAller and Lisa Baker Morgan are meeting guests and signing their books. There are exclusive VIP shopping offers for Global Conference attendees along with a chance to win grand prizes totaling over $31,000. A map and a list of shops will be included on your "passport" to the event. Don't miss this event!
7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

8:00 pm - 9:30 pm

Wednesday, April 29, 2015
5:30 am - 7:00 am

6:00 am - 8:15 am

6:00 am - 3:00 pm
Registration for the 2015 Global Conference will be available in the Beverly Hilton lobby
7:00 am - 8:15 am

Speakers
Greg Brown, Chairman and CEO, Motorola Solutions, Inc.
Chris Cernich, Managing Director, M&A and Contested Elections, Institutional Shareholder Services
Keith Meister, Managing Partner and Chief Investment Officer, Corvex Management LP
Clifton Robbins, Founder and CEO, Blue Harbour Group
Jeffrey Smith, Managing Member, CEO and Chief Investment Officer, Starboard Value
8:30 am - 9:45 am
Sub-Saharan Africa has emerged as one of the world's fastest-growing regions. Over the past 15 years, market capitalization for businesses in the region has tripled, spurred by diversification into sectors such as financial services, telecommunications, real estate and retail. Which African geographies and industries are most promising today? What policies and infrastructure projects are needed to unlock Africa's potential? And what is required of local businesses, government and the international businesses community? This session brings together notable business leaders representing a cross-section of the continent's geographies and industries to discuss their priorities, challenges, outlooks and approaches to doing business in Africa.
Moderator
Jonathan Berman, Fellow, Milken Institute; Author, "Success in Africa"
Speakers
Mimi Alemayehou, Managing Director, Black Rhino; Executive Advisor and Chair, Blackstone Africa Infrastructure LP
Bassim Haidar , CEO, Channel IT Group; CEO, GMT Nigeria Ltd.
Paul Hinks, CEO, Symbion Power; Chairman, Corporate Council on Africa
A.B.C. Orjiako, Chairman, Seplat Petroleum Development Co. Plc
8:30 am - 9:45 am
The global economic outlook is clouded with uncertainty. Even with the U.S. economy poised for continued growth. However, conflicts in the Middle East and Ukraine, coupled with the plunging Russian Ruble and the prospect of higher U.S. interest rates raise critical questions for global investors. China's economy faces the challenge of diminishing growth and a cooling real estate market. Can government reforms ease the transition to a consumption-based society before it's too late? Quantitative easing in Japan and Europe is expected jump-start their economies? But is it too little too late? Can the dollar maintain its strength, and how will it influence the U.S. recovery? What effect will oil prices have on global markets? Should market participants give equal weight to deflationary pressures as they do inflationary? Our panelist of investment gurus will offer their insight and pose questions of their own.
Moderator
Nora Everett, President, Retirement and Investor Services, and Chairman, Principal Funds, Principal Financial Group
Speakers
John Calamos Sr., CEO and Global Co-Chief Investment Officer, Calamos Investments
Sarah Ketterer, CEO and Portfolio Manager, Causeway Capital Management LLC
Robert Kricheff, Senior Vice President and Portfolio Manager, Shenkman Capital
Morris Mark, Founder and Managing Partner, Mark Asset Management
Clifton Robbins, Founder and CEO, Blue Harbour Group
8:30 am - 9:45 am
Since Becker's initial insights in 1962, there is a growing awareness that human capital and positive organizational dynamics are key to firm survival and prosperity. Simply put, the set of investments that potentially influence the well-being and productivity of people, firms and nations will ultimately determine economic sustainability of an inclusive economy. Beyond simple measures of employee turnover, time to fill firms and other efficiency measures, a great deal of research informs leadership practices, employee engagement , building knowledge capital, workforce optimization, and learning capacity as key measures of firm performance.
Moderator
Richard Ditizio, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Milken Institute
Speakers
Edward Lawler, Distinguished Professor of Business and Director, Center for Effective Organizations, Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California
Susan Ochs, Founder, Better Banking Project, and Senior Fellow, New America Foundation
Efrat Peled, Chairman and CEO, Arison Investments
Pamela Thomas-Graham, Chief Marketing and Talent Officer, Head of Private Banking and Wealth Management New Markets, Credit Suisse
Gregory Unruh, Arison Professor of Values Leadership, George Mason University
8:30 am - 9:45 am
The Milken Institute is proud to support the Morgan Stanley Sustainable Investing Challenge, the preeminent global impact investing competition for graduate business students. Focused on both financial and social returns, impact investing is growing rapidly. Investors are hungry for opportunities and participants now include many of the world's most astute investors who see winning strategies combining their capital and their values. Some of the most exciting impact opportunities are being developed by a new generation of social entrepreneurs creating market-based solutions to large-scale global challenges. Be ready with your questions for the Sustainable Investing Challenge winning team and join us for a stimulating, interactive panel to learn how these future leaders are changing the face of impact investing.
Moderator
Paul Irving, Chairman, Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging; Distinguished Scholar in Residence, University of Southern California Davis School of Gerontology
Speakers
Dave Chen, CEO, Equilibrium Capital Group
Zach Knight, Co-Founder, Blue Forest Conservation
Leigh Madeira, Co-Founder, Blue Forest Conservation
Chad Reed, Co-Founder, Blue Forest Conservation
Nick Wobbrock, Co-Founder, Blue Forest Conservation
10:00 am - 11:00 am
As Asia's wealth grows, new investors from the region are looking for prospects beyond their borders. Chinese corporates are poised to take an even larger role in global commerce as they turn to cross-border mergers and acquisitions. The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank has attracted membership applications from over 40 countries. A series of government measures encouraging overseas investment are expected to help Chinese firms expand in markets such as South America, Southeast Asia and Africa, particularly in building nuclear power and rail infrastructure. The new rules will benefit Chinese companies, but will the growth in overseas investment also increase China's influence in emerging and developing nations? Will the Chinese and other new Asian investors find themselves in competition with the traditional investors from developed countries, or will these new infusions of capital simply be absorbed by the huge appetite for infrastructure building?
Moderator
Kevin Lu, CEO, Partners Group Singapore
Speakers
André Loesekrug-Pietri, Chairman, A Capital Funds; Chairman, Paulina Foundation
Jiannong Qian, Vice President, Fosun Group; President, Fosun Tourism & Commercial Group
Jordi Visser, President and Chief Investment Officer, Weiss Multi-Strategy Advisers LLC
10:00 am - 11:00 am
In a world of digital everything, it's not just consumers who are cutting the cord to cable TV. A growing number of networks, including HBO, CBS and ESPN, are offering their own "over-the-top" viewing options. Instead of signing up with a cable provider, audiences will actually be able subscribe to the network's own Internet-delivered streaming service. Mobile carriers like AT&T, Singtel and Vodafone are testing similar ideas such as sponsored data as a way of recouping the costs of delivering services on their networks. What is this new content that's attracting this new world of viewers and who is buying the rights? To what extent are content creators and network operators well-positioned to benefit from these trends and drive long-term profit and cash flow growth?
Moderator
Ken Rutkowski, Host and Co-Founder, "Business Rockstars"
Speakers
Thom Beers, CEO, FremantleMedia North America
Mark Greenberg, President and CEO, EPIX
Chad Gutstein, CEO, Machinima
Andy Schuon, Co-Founder, Revolt
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Investing for both a financial and social return has never been easier with a greater variety of investment products designed to attract a broader range of investors. Options for socially focused investing have grown to include everything from microfinance funds to private equity and structured-debt products. And yet, mainstream investors, for the most part, have stayed away. Regardless of the reasons, impact investing has not yet reached its full potential. To achieve the scale necessary to meet the growing capital needs, the stories behind successful impact investments must reach a bigger audience. This panel will highlight successful investments products across asset classes and sectors and demonstrate the potential for financial return. Panelists will discuss the evolution of the various opportunities and the steps needed to better match the investment to the investor.
Moderator
Jean Case, CEO, Case Foundation
Speakers
Thomas Hyland, Co-Founder and Partner, Aspada Investment Advisors
Kimbal Musk, Co-Founder, The Kitchen; Board Member, Tesla Motors
Jacqueline Novogratz, Founder and CEO, Acumen
Dimple Sahni, Senior Director, Impact Investing, Anthos Asset Management
Gary White, CEO and Co-Founder, Water.org
10:00 am - 11:00 am
The World Bank, the G-20 and other multilateral institutions are encouraging new investments to address the need for improvements in global infrastructure. Traditionally, countries have relied on project finance to cover the cost of building roads, power grids, communications networks and water systems. However, a growing interest in reliable, long-term investments is drawing attention to alternatives, such as publicly traded funds and public-private partnerships, which can attract a wider variety of investors. The search is prompting some to ask if infrastructure will become the newest asset class. What are the challenges to creating bankable infrastructure projects around the world? And what are the best practices for accelerating growth of infrastructure investments as an asset class and reduce uncertainty regarding projects? Join us as leaders in infrastructure share their outlook and discuss where infrastructure fits in their portfolios.
Moderator
Staci Warden, Executive Director, Center for Financial Markets, Milken Institute
Speakers
Chinelo Anohu-Amazu, Director General, Nigerian National Pension Commission
Brian Chase, Principal and Head of North American Origination, Campbell Lutyens & Co. Inc.
Andrew Claerhout, Senior Vice President, Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan
Glen Ireland, Founding Partner, InfraShare Partners
Gachao Kiuna, CEO, TransCentury Ltd.
10:00 am - 11:00 am
While pension funds are still the leading source of "patient" capital, often deployed in financing infrastructure and building long-term business value, the amount they provide has declined markedly over the years. Persistent low rates of return across conservative asset classes are prompting investors to stretch for return and yield by increasing their allocations to equities and alternative investments such as hedge funds, private equity and real estate. At the same time, the rise of short-term benchmarking, along with regulatory change, has led funds to shrink their time horizons. Do funds have an ethical obligation to think long-term? Can pensions do that while meeting the demographically driven demand for payouts from their members? How can CIOs manage their portfolios and meet plan obligations in the current market environment? What changes are they weighing to their governance, compliance and asset allocation strategies as they reassess risk/return strategies?
Moderator
Jay Hooley, Chairman and CEO, State Street Corp.
Speakers
Jagdeep Singh Bachher, Chief Investment Officer and Vice President of Investments, University of California
Janet Cowell, Treasurer, North Carolina
Britt Harris, Chief Investment Officer, Teacher Retirement System of Texas
Hiromichi Mizuno, Executive Managing Director and Chief Investment Officer, Government Pension Investment Fund, Japan
Ron Mock, President and CEO, Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan
10:00 am - 11:00 am
The world we live in is more complex than ever, and so are the people we work with. Do the time-honored principles of leadership still apply to navigating a mash-up of markets, cultures, and conflicts? How do you turn your company, organization or institution into a powerhouse, or turn it around when it's struggling? Expertise, even brilliance, may not be enough. A strategic bent and a knack for big-picture thinking can be crucial, but communication skills and savvy team-building may be even more valuable. As the ground shifts, the nimble -- those willing to admit mistakes, learn from them and change course -- can earn their stripes. Character counts too. People are willing to follow those who inspire trust and lead by example. Our own powerhouse panel will discuss what they've learned at the helm along with the successes, and failures, that got them there.
Moderator
Joel Kurtzman, Managing Senior Fellow, Milken Institute
Speakers
Nikesh Arora, Vice Chairman, Softbank
Eric Cantor, Vice Chairman and Managing Director, Moelis & Co.; Former Majority Leader, U.S. House of Representatives
Sherry Lansing, CEO, Sherry Lansing Foundation; Founder, EnCorps Teachers Program
Don Peebles, Founder, Chairman and CEO, Peebles Corp.
Judy Smith, President and CEO, Smith & Co.
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Art prices are soaring, driven upward by new buyers joining the search for rare classics or the next master. Last year, Sotheby's and Christie's each reported record sales, with about a third going to first-time buyers. And earlier this year, a Gauguin reportedly was sold privately for about $300 million, one of the highest prices ever paid for a painting. The art world is thriving. Galleries, online sales and the exclusive worldwide show circuit all attract a diverse and often elite clientele. Art collectors are often both savvy investors and passionate connoisseurs who appreciate the tradition of assembling unmatched troves. Join our panelists as they explore the reasons behind the record-shattering growth as well as the finer points of art collecting.
Moderator
Donald Marron, Chairman and Founder, Lightyear Capital; former CEO, PaineWebber
Speakers
Kavita Chellaram, CEO, Arthouse Contemporary Ltd.; Founder, Arthouse Foundation
Mitchell Rales, Chairman, Executive Committee and Co-Founder, Danaher Corp.; Chairman and Co-Founder, Colfax Corp.
Philippe Vergne, Director, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
10:00 am - 11:00 am
With the right technologies, the ocean can become the source of clean energy and a sustainable food supply for the world's growing population. In the process, our seas can also generate jobs in new industries that don't threaten the environment. Advocates of the Blue Economy suggest that sea-based energy projects, using tidal, current and wave-based technologies, will attract $190 billion in new investments over the next 20 years. But whether investors center on energy, food production, or biomedicine, developing a deeper understanding of the ocean can lead to solutions that are environmentally beneficial while providing significant financial and social benefits. This panel brings together marine scientists, business leaders and policymakers to preview the most creative proposals for using the ocean to improve the quality of life.
Moderator
Conrad Kiechel, Director of Communications, Milken Institute
Speakers
Paul Bunje, Senior Director for Oceans, XPrize Foundation
Jenny Krusoe, Chief Financial and Operating Officer, Altasea
Diane Regas, Senior Vice President, Programs, Environmental Defense Fund
10:00 am - 11:00 am
In an industry obsessed with records and statistics, the sports juggernaut continues to roll on. This year's Super Bowl set yet another TV record, with an average of more than 114 million viewers - the most watch event in American TV history. Meanwhile, the values of sports franchises continue their mercurial climb, with the NBA's Clippers - bought by Steve Ballmer last summer for $2 billion - the most recent example. The NFL continues as the industry's giant, but other sports, such as soccer, continue to gain fans - and lucrative TV deals. How are these deals valued? And how do sports executives determine what's going to draw fans and big dollars in the future? How much are analytics a part of their strategy? And what opportunities are being created by the growing power of women in the industry? This panel looks at this multi-billion-dollar industry and where it's headed.
Moderator
Peter Guber, Chairman and CEO, Mandalay Entertainment; Owner and Co-Executive Chairman, Golden State Warriors
Speakers
Laurence Baer, President and CEO, San Francisco Giants
Dan Beckerman, President and CEO, AEG
Christine Driessen, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, ESPN
Ed Snider, Chairman, Comcast-Spectacor
Joe Torre, Chief Baseball Officer, Major League Baseball, Office of the Commissioner
10:00 am - 11:00 am
The necessity for workers to expand their vocational skills to higher-level, industry-specific expertise is growing as technology continues to disrupt the work environment. Filling the gap between labor demand and supply is an important step in both democratizing access to skill-building opportunities and reducing income disparity among households worldwide. But how can educational institutions meet this challenge in a time of budget cuts and retrenchment? What is the role of private businesses in the educational process? How can technologies be leveraged to better manage students in programs, monitor their progress and match them to jobs in a seamless process. This panel will discuss what schools and technology companies are doing worldwide to meet workforce needs.
Moderator
Giselle Fernandez, Television journalist, producer and filmmaker
Speakers
Felix Ortiz III, Founder, Chairman and CEO, Viridis Learning
Eloy Ortiz Oakley, Superintendent-President, Long Beach City College
Chris Romer, President and Co-Founder, Quad Learning, Inc. (American Honors); Former Colorado State Senator
Raúl Valentín, Vice President, Talent Acquisition, Comcast
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Russia is a question mark for the future of the world order, or as Churchill put it, a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma. It remains a land of tremendous potential and, for many in the West, a source of fear. Since the Kremlin's intervention in Ukraine last year, economic sanctions have been imposed, sabers have rattled, the ruble has crashed and Russia's isolation has deepened. Yet during the heyday of Wall Street optimism about the BRIC nations -- not so long ago -- Russia posted healthy growth rates and its people enjoyed a swiftly rising standard of living. Some still consider Russia an attractive destination for capital in the longer term, even despite current frictions. True, its factories' finished goods stir meager demand, but Russia sits on what may be the world's richest store of minerals. Can Putin's petrostate ultimately diversify its economy and find a place in the world system that benefits everyone? It recently struck an energy mega-deal with China. How will the two giants' vacillating efforts to strengthen ties unfold? Our panel will assess the economic opportunity as well as the military risk and unwrap the riddle that is Russia.
Moderator
Matthew Winkler, Editor-in-Chief Emeritus, Bloomberg News
Speakers
David Bonderman, Founding Partner, TPG
Susan Eisenhower, Chairman and CEO, Eisenhower Group, Inc.
Ruben Vardanyan, Founder and Chairman, RVVZ Foundation; Former CEO and Chairman, Troika Dialog
Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg, Chairman and Founder, Spitzberg Partners LLC; Former Minister of Defense and Former Minister of Economics and Technology, Germany
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Over the past decades, Israel has turned adversity into a competitive advantage. Beyond the geopolitical storms raging around it, Israel's future rests largely on its ability to continually reinvent its technological mojo and transfer it to partners in other emerging economies. Co-innovation with new partnerships focused on global problems with high growth potential, such as water management, agricultural science for food, alternative energy, health, and of course, cyber-security -- in which Israel already has world-beating technology -- are key. Israel's strategic economic plan envisions the scaling up of startup nation models in many regions. Yet this requires closing gaps in economic participation within Israel itself and strengthening ties beyond its "island" economy. At this event, we'll report on our fieldwork in research, development and training in Israel.
Moderator
Glenn Yago, Senior Fellow and Founder, Financial Innovations Labs, Milken Institute; Senior Director, Milken Innovation Center, Jerusalem Institute
Speakers
Yossi Beinart, CEO, Tel Aviv Stock Exchange
Orna Berry, Corporate Vice President, Growth and Innovation, EMC Centers of Excellence EMEA and the U.S.
Yoram Cohen, Director, UCLA Water Technology Research Center; Professor, UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science
Jonathan Medved, Founder and CEO, OurCrowd
Nora Yang, Director, Portfolio Management and Strategic Operations, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Growing troves of information stored in the cloud has exacerbated the conflict between the individual's right to privacy and the public good. The cloud allows us to access photos, emails and documents from multiple devices, but without encryption our information is vulnerable to hackers. One solution is to encrypt data in storage and during transmission. Some tech firms even tout their inability to view files stored for customers as a selling point. However, U.S. security agencies contend that fully encrypted data raise national security concerns and want companies to allow access when presented with a warrant. The European Union has moved in the other direction by recognizing the "right to be forgotten" and requiring Google to consider requests to remove links to articles that damage reputations. What is the right balance between privacy and security? Should tech companies be required to unlock data? And does the "right to be forgotten" amount to censorship?
Moderator
Dennis Kneale, Principal, Dennis Kneale Media
Speakers
Michelle Finneran Dennedy, Vice President and Chief Privacy Officer, Intel Security; Founder, iDennedy Project
Susan Graham, Pehong Chen Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Emerita, University of California, Berkeley
Susan Herman, President, American Civil Liberties Union; Centennial Professor of Law, Brooklyn Law School
Stan Stahl, Chief Information Security Officer, Private.me; President, ISSA-LA
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
American business has played a key role in the recent successes of the LGBT rights movement. Early support for marriage equality from Wall Street, tech communities and the entertainment industry drove that process forward. More recently, in Arizona, Indiana and Arkansas, the mainstream business community, including companies like Walmart, played a crucial role in preventing anti-gay legislation from being enacted or successfully pressed for its modification. Now the Supreme Court is about to rule on whether gay marriage must be permitted in all 50 states, and business groups have submitted briefs in support. Why has the partnership between business and gay rights been so successful? Why have American businesses been able to have such a profound impact on public policy in this area while experiencing bigger challenges in others, like immigration, the environment and healthcare. What are the lessons that can be learned from this partnership? And is there still room for debate in the business community about LGBT issues?
Moderator
Katie O'Reilly, Executive Director, Business and Program Development, Milken Institute
Speakers
Dustin Lance Black, Filmmaker and Human Rights Activist
Nicole Douillet , Head of LGBT Strategy and Product Innovation, Private Banking and Wealth Management New Markets Division, Credit Suisse
Richard Socarides, Head of Public Affairs, GLG
Matthew Winkler, Editor-in-Chief Emeritus, Bloomberg News
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
India's "gasping elephant" economy appears to be getting a second wind. Optimism has been rising since Narendra Modi was elected prime minister on a business-friendly reform agenda last year. India is outperforming the other BRICs and Modi has fast-tracked reforms in mining and insurance. But big challenges remain. His Bharatiya Janata Party suffered a setback in the New Delhi state elections in February and critics accuse him of a piecemeal approach to change. In which sectors would India welcome investment, and where are investors likely to see growth? Will corruption, fraud, India's rigid social hierarchy and overly complex regulations stand in the way? Will Modi make good on his promise to increase infrastructure spending and cut taxes for corporations? And will India finally shed the "gasping elephant" moniker and become Asia's next growth engine?
Moderator
Brooks Entwistle, Partner and CEO, Everstone Capital
Speakers
Bhavish Aggarwal, CEO and Co-Founder, Ola
Praveen Chakravarty, Strategic Advisor, Bombay Stock Exchange
Man Jit Singh, President, Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
This private, off-the record session will convene a select group of industry experts, government decision-makers and investors to explore how the private sector can apply its financial resources, expertise and innovation to address the growing energy infrastructure deficit in Africa. This session will review the recommendations from the previous Financial Innovations Lab in October 2014 and explore various emerging financial tools to help remove the barriers to attracting a larger number of investors.
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
As a growing population of older adults emerges, a revolution in the culture of aging is underway. Older adults increasingly seek to age in place and at home. They're staying in the workforce longer, and expressing new attitudes about health, housing, transportation and education. They're upending convention, remaining active and contributing members of their communities. Cities are on the frontlines of this revolution. How cities and city leaders deal with the challenges and opportunities presented by this demographic change will affect a massive number of people across the age spectrum - and across the world. What will make cities age-friendly for the future? What innovations lie ahead? Which cities might lead and which might lag? Our panel of thought leaders will challenge Global Conference participants to think differently about the future of cities.
Moderator
Joseph Coughlin, Director, Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab
Speakers
Michael W. Hodin, Executive Director, Global Coalition on Aging; Managing Partner, High Lantern Group
Paul Irving, Chairman, Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging; Distinguished Scholar in Residence, University of Southern California Davis School of Gerontology
Nora Super, Executive Director, White House Conference on Aging
Fernando Torres-Gil, Director, Center for Policy Research on Aging, Luskin School of Public Affairs, University of California, Los Angeles
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
A revolution in medicine is underway. Precision medicine--a field that draws on genomics, advanced devices and computers science--enables doctors to diagnose and design unique treatments for individual patients. This new approach represents a major leap forward from the one-therapy-fits-all approach of the past. In particular, it offers hope to the most vulnerable patients--the very young, the very old and those who suffer from autoimmune diseases. Precision medicine also offers an economic benefit: productivity will increase if people are healthier and need to take fewer sick days. President Obama recently proposed a precision medicine initiative, and at a time when bipartisan agreement is rare, the concept has won support from both sides of the aisle. This panel will discuss this exciting, disruptive new field and what can be done to accelerate its use against life-threatening diseases.
Moderator
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Speakers
Margaret Anderson, Executive Director, FasterCures, a Center of the Milken Institute
Brian Druker, Director, Oregon Health and Science University Knight Cancer Institute; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Sam Hawgood, Chancellor, University of California, San Francisco
Pradeep Khosla, Chancellor, University of California, San Diego
Elizabeth Nabel, President, Brigham and Women’s Health Care; Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
We need nature to live, eat and work, but nature does not need us. Each year, we burn more than 15 million hectares of forest. We have overfished nearly a third of the world's fisheries and nearly driven many species including elephants, rhinos and gorillas to extinction. But as the global population grows, so will our reliance on nature. The time for change is now. From eliminating poaching, protecting rainforests and renewing our oceans, efforts are underway to reverse the damage we have done to the environment. But what are the most successful models for collaboration and how can more donors, companies and investors get involved? The answer includes strategic philanthropy, government initiatives and investment funds directed toward conservation-oriented companies. Our panelists will discuss how they were galvanized to promote conservation and the trends they see for scaling up resources to conserve our flora and fauna for generations to come.
Moderator
Aimée Christensen, CEO, Christensen Global Strategies; Executive Director, Sun Valley Institute for Resilience
Speakers
Kathryn Bigelow, Film Director and Producer
David Bonderman, Founding Partner, TPG
Philippe Cousteau, Founder, EarthEcho International; Founder, Voyacy Group
Greg Hittelman, Director of Communications, Enough Project
Thomas Kaplan, Co-Founder and Executive Chairman, Panthera Corp.; Chairman, Electrum Group
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Reform-minded thinkers are taking a look at two touchstones of American political discourse: the federal tax code and conservative philosophy. What is the likelihood that either will change? In back-to-back interviews, Peter Passell, editor of the renowned quarterly the Milken Institute Review, sits down with two contributors to assess the possibilities. From 11:15-11:45 a.m., Reihan Salam, executive editor of the National Review and a columnist for Slate, will discuss the rise of "reform conservatism," a movement focused on fresh ideas for solving the nation's social and economic problems. Salam will be followed from 11:45-12:15 p.m. by Len Burman, a former deputy assistant Secretary of the Treasury and director of the Urban Institute-Brookings Institution's Tax Policy Center, who will examine the prospects for tax reform and its potential for increasing both the efficiency and equity of the federal tax system.
Moderator
Peter Passell, Senior Fellow, Milken Institute; Editor, The Milken Institute Review
Speakers
Leonard Burman, Director, Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center; Paul Volcker Professor, Maxwell School, Syracuse University
Reihan Salam, Executive Editor, National Review
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
What's the future look like? Surgical robots that can go almost anywhere in the human body, fixing ailments that previously were unreachable or required invasive surgery. Or a robotic cop that looks like R2-D2 and fights crime 24/7 using laser cameras and facial recognition software to pick up clues, and then alerts authorities to threats. And a technology that repairs bone damage using bone grown from a patient's own cells. The Future is here. In this panel, three speakers working on amazing things will tell us what they're up to -- and it'll blow your mind.
Moderator
Richard Sandler, Executive Vice President, Milken Family Foundation; Partner, Law Offices of Maron & Sandler
Speakers
Frederic Moll, Chairman and CEO, Auris Surgical Robotics, Inc.
William Santana Li, Chairman and CEO, Knightscope, Inc.
Nina Tandon, CEO and Co-Founder, EpiBone; Co-Author, "Super Cells: Building With Biology"
11:15 am - 12:15 pm

Speakers
Gary Friedman, Chairman & CEO, Restoration Hardware
Mark Masinter, Founder and Managing Member, Open Realty Advisors
12:30 pm - 2:30 pm
12:45-1:15 PM      A Conversation With Jerry Brown and Kevin de León
Institute Chairman Mike Milken chats with California Governor Jerry Brown and Kevin de León, president pro tempore of the California State Senate, about the state's response to climate change. California has been a leader addressing climate change with actions ranging from the 2006 passage of AB32, the California Global Warming Solutions Act, which required sharp reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, to the governor's more recent water conservation plan for dealing with the prolonged drought. Go to Part 1 on YouTube.


1:30-2:30 PM     Trends in Global Entertainment
Fast-changing technology isn't the only challenge facing the entertainment industry. Film and television companies also must adapt to the tastes and cultural priorities of a growing global middle class with money to spend on -- and invest in -- content. Reaching these new audiences outside the U.S. can mean the difference in profit and loss. Some changes are already apparent. For example, cultural references in big, blockbuster films are less specific and casts more international. What other changes will we see in film, television and web content? And who are the entertainment industry's new investors? This panel of Hollywood leaders will examine how the new global marketplace is changing the type of content studios produce, and how they are financing it. Go to Part 2 on YouTube.

Moderator
Julia Boorstin, Media and Entertainment Reporter, CNBC
Interviewer
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Speakers
Nina Jacobson, Principal and Producer, Color Force
Michael Lynton, CEO, Sony Entertainment; Chairman and CEO, Sony Pictures Entertainment
Leslie Moonves, President and CEO, CBS Corporation
Peter Rice, Chairman and CEO, Fox Networks Group
Guests
Jerry Brown, Governor, State of California
Kevin de León, President pro Tempore, California State Senate
2:45 pm - 3:45 pm
With globalization, rapid technological change and the rise of emerging economies, the U.S. must embrace a multi-dimensional approach to global leadership that utilizes commerce as an essential tool to meet policy goals. Join Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker for a discussion highlighting ways that business leaders can leverage their knowledge and on-the-ground relationships to advance common U.S. interests abroad.
Moderator
Terrence Duffy, Executive Chairman and President, CME Group
Speaker
Penny Pritzker, Secretary, U.S. Department of Commerce
2:45 pm - 3:45 pm
As unmanned missions such as landing on a comet and exploring Mars inspire wonder and demonstrate what science can do, interest in the prospect of human space flight continues to rise. However, the U.S. collaboration with Russia on the International Space Station is nearing its end. How people will travel through space in the future has become an open question. If the U.S. decides to commit itself to the cause, can we do it alone? Can the space program become economically sustainable? Can the private sector make it profitable? Is asteroid mining a place to focus resources? And do we have the means to actually put someone on Mars? Our panel will probe the future of public and commercial space flight--the goals, the economics and how far the will to explore may take us.
Moderator
Rick Newman, Columnist, Yahoo Finance
Speakers
John Elbon, Vice President and General Manager, Space Exploration, Boeing Co.
William Gerstenmaier, Associate Administrator, Human Exploration and Operations, NASA
Michael Hawes, Vice President and Orion Program Manager, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co.
Naveen Jain, Founder, Moon Express
Julie Van Kleeck, Vice President, Advanced Space and Launch Business Unit, Aerojet Rocketdyne
2:45 pm - 3:45 pm
The last century produced advances in science that would be unimaginable to earlier generations, and no achievement had more impact than the extension of human life. Innovations in medicine and sanitation saw a radical increase in lifespan leading to unprecedented global economic growth and individual opportunity. But researchers are not resting on their laurels and the search for new scientific pathways is accelerating. Advances in genomics, proteomics, informatics, computing and cell therapy technologies bring with them the likelihood of extending lifespan further -- very possibly, much further. Dr. Craig Venter and Dr. Peter Diamandis, pioneers in this emerging field, join us to explain the opportunities and challenges ahead in the search for longer and healthier lives.
Introduction By
Paul Irving, Chairman, Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging; Distinguished Scholar in Residence, University of Southern California Davis School of Gerontology
Speakers
Peter Diamandis, Chairman and CEO, XPRIZE Foundation; Co-Founder and Vice Chairman, Human Longevity Inc.
J. Craig Venter, Co-Founder, Executive Chairman and CEO, Human Longevity Inc.; Founder, Executive Chairman and CEO, J. Craig Venter Institute
2:45 pm - 3:45 pm
Precision medicine--the ability to tailor treatments based on a patient's unique genomic makeup--is ushering in a golden age of medicine. It also offers the greatest hope for developing better therapies and finding cures for the very young, the very old and everyone who is at risk for cancer. Collaborative investments in research infrastructure by industry, academic institutions and governments promise not only to accelerate progress against disease, but generate strong economic growth. Recognizing this potential, President Obama proposed a new precision medicine initiative during his State of the Union address in January. Medical, academic and government leaders from California, home to six of America's 12 top-performing metropolitan areas in biotechnology, will discuss strategies for advancing precision medicine and seeding prosperity.
Moderator
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Speakers
Gene Block, Chancellor, University of California, Los Angeles
Gray Davis, Of Counsel, Loeb & Loeb LLP; Former Governor of California
Nicholas Dirks, Chancellor, University of California, Berkeley
Sam Hawgood, Chancellor, University of California, San Francisco
Pradeep Khosla, Chancellor, University of California, San Diego
Jonathan Simons, President and CEO, Prostate Cancer Foundation; Senior Advisor, Milken Institute
2:45 pm - 3:45 pm
The war on terror has become a truly global conflict. ISIS remains a powerful force in Iraq, Syria and Libya, while other terror groups are entrenched in Nigeria and Libya. In Yemen, Saudi Arabia and its Arab allies battle Iranian-based insurgents. Earlier this month, al-Shabab carried out a horrific attack in Kenya. The war's expansion to multiple fronts raises important questions for policymakers and military leaders. With military budget cuts under way in the U.S., UK, Germany and other Western countries, how can commanders make the best use of shrinking resources? Is airpower enough to defeat ISIS, or is deployment of ground troops inevitable? How will the Arab League's intervention in Yemen affect the broader war against terror? What can be done in Nigeria, where authorities are struggling to contain Boko Haram?
Moderator
Matt Driskill, Lieutenant Commander and Operations Officer, Electronic Attack Squadron 129, U.S. Navy
Speakers
Kimberly Field, Brigadier General (Ret.), U.S. Army; Former Joint Staff Deputy Director, Political-Military Affairs for the Middle East, Department of Defense
John Gallagher, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army; Special Assistant to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
Daniel Yoo, Brigadier General and Assistant Division Commander, U.S. Marine Corps
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
After more than 200 public and private sessions, the final panel of the 18th annual Milken Institute Global Conference is a spirited dialogue about creating global prosperity. In the United States, job creation and wages are key concerns, yet there's a growing mismatch between the supply and demand for skills. How can we resolve this? Across the pond, the future of the Eurozone itself is in question. Should Europe spend more on public investments and infrastructure, or is austerity the wiser course? Africa may be the growth story of the 21st century, but its challenges are significant and as varied as its 54 constituent nations. Political and military instability--coupled with drastic changes in global fossil fuel supplies--are roiling the Middle East. And what's become of the BRIC nations--Brazil, Russia, India and China? This quick trip around the world will deliver you back to Los Angeles wiser for the journey.
Moderator
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Speakers
Tony Blair, Former Prime Minister, Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Strive Masiyiwa, Founder and Chairman, Econet Wireless
Kathy Matsui, Vice Chair, Goldman Sachs Japan Co., Ltd.
Nouriel Roubini, Chairman, Roubini Global Economics; Professor of Economics, Stern School of Business, New York University
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm