Saturday, April 30, 2016
5:30 pm - 10:00 pm
Beverly Wilshire
To learn more, please visit www.globalgourmetgames.org
Sunday, May 1, 2016
8:30 am - 11:30 am
Stardust
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Board Room
12:00 pm - 4:00 pm
International Gallery
12:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Beverly Hills Ballroom
An annual series of fireside chats, led by Institute Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Richard Ditizio. He will moderate a series of one-on-one conversations with business executives and other thought leaders. With an audience of conference VIPs and C-suite representatives from among the world’s leading asset-owners and asset-management firms, this casual gathering offers a chance to have an honest, open discussion with some of the most important and influential Global Conference attendees.
Speakers
Taro Aso, Deputy Prime Minister, Japan
Richard Ditizio, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Milken Institute
Al Gore, Chairman, Generation Investment Management; Former U.S. Vice President
Jason Kelly, New York Bureau Chief, Bloomberg
Michael Mullen, Senior Advisor, Providence Equity Partners; Former Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman, Alphabet
Andrew Witty, CEO, GlaxoSmithKline
5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Poolside - West
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Trader Vic's
Monday, May 2, 2016
6:00 am - 8:30 am
Beverly Hills Ballroom Foyer
6:30 am - 8:00 am
Stardust
Moderator
Sarah Sandler, Director, Business and Program Development, Milken Institute
Speaker
David Rubenstein, Co-Founder and Co-CEO, The Carlyle Group
7:30 am - 9:00 am
Oakhurst
This private session features key California policymakers and some of the state's most forward-thinking entrepreneurs for a conversation about the future of technology and innovation in California. This closed-door, off-the-record discussion will focus on how public and private sector leaders can ensure that California remains a leader in digital health, education and financial services around the world. Is STEM education in the state providing the workforce that will be required to develop the next generation of innovation? What advantages and disadvantages affect California's ability to attract and retain the world's most promising technological companies?
7:30 am - 9:00 am
International Gallery
To kick off the 2016 Global Conference, we would like to invite you to join us as a special guest for our invitation-only CEO and Investor Roundtable. This high-level roundtable series has become an opening tradition at our Global Conference. The session will bring together esteemed participants from the public and private sectors -- including multinational executives, government leaders, and senior institutional and private equity investors -- to discuss ways to stimulate growth and improve commerce in fast-growing economies around the world.
Moderator
Mindy Silverstein, Managing Director, Credit Suisse
Speakers
Tony Blair, Former Prime Minister, Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Vijoy Chattergy , Chief Investment Officer, Hawaii Employees Retirement System
Francis Gatare, CEO, Rwanda Development Board; Cabinet Member, Republic of Rwanda
Hua Jingdong , Vice President and Treasurer, International Finance Corp.
Strive Masiyiwa, Founder and Chairman, Econet Wireless
Denis D. O'Brien, Chairman and Principal Shareholder, Digicel Group
Brian Pellegrino, Chief Investment Officer, United Parcel Service
Juan Carlos Pinzón, Ambassador of Colombia to the United States
8:00 am - 9:15 am
Beverly Hills Ballroom
Introduction By
Jayne Van Hoen, Executive Director, Events, Milken Institute
Speaker
Al Gore, Chairman, Generation Investment Management; Former U.S. Vice President
8:00 am - 9:15 am
International Ballroom
Global capital markets opened 2016 facing more uncertainty than perhaps at any time since the 2008 crash. As China's economic slowdown reverberated worldwide, it fueled another dive in commodities and deeper losses in global equity markets -- in many cases, to multiyear lows. In the U.S., the corporate-profit recession has intensified. In Japan and Europe, central banks are promoting negative interest rates in a controversial new stimulus effort. In recent months, however, some of the economic and market gloom has lifted, and commodities and equities have bounced. Still, capital markets remain deeply apprehensive about the near-term outlook. This panel of experts opens Global Conference with a discussion of some of the most pressing issues facing markets. Are fears about emerging economies' growth overblown -- or understated? Is currency depreciation now a dangerous race to the bottom? Will oil's crash be a net positive or negative for the global economy? Would "Brexit" derail any European recovery? And how will markets adjust to a tighter Federal Reserve versus new central bank stimulus elsewhere?
Moderator
Thomas Finke, Chairman and CEO, Babson Capital Management
Speakers
Afsaneh Beschloss, Founder, President and CEO, The Rock Creek Group
Mohamed El-Erian, Chief Economic Advisor, Allianz; Chair, President’s Global Development Council
David Harding, Founder and CEO, Winton
Joseph Hooley, Chairman and CEO, State Street Corp.
Steven Tananbaum, Founder, Managing Partner and Chief Investment Officer, GoldenTree Asset Management
8:00 am - 9:15 am
Wilshire Ballroom
Advances in science and technology have ushered in what some refer to as a new "golden age" of medical research. The pace appears to be accelerating, with breathtaking new developments in neuroscience, precision medicine, gene editing and immunotherapy occurring so rapidly it's difficult to keep up. Patients are helping to drive progress by demanding and donating their personal data and by adding their perspectives to the R&D process. Silicon Valley is applying its expertise in big data collection and analytics. What are the next steps to encourage and sustain these advances? What might threaten this golden age of medical research?
Moderator
Margaret Anderson, Executive Director, FasterCures, a Center of the Milken Institute
Speakers
Francis Collins, Director, National Institutes of Health
Kathy Giusti, Founder and Executive Chairman, Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Kevin Yoder, U.S. Representative, Kansas; Member, Committee on Appropriations
Elias Zerhouni, President, Global Research and Development, Sanofi
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Palm
As China's growth slows, more investors and multinationals are turning to Southeast Asia, one of the world's fastest-growing consumer markets. Although depressed commodity prices, tepid export demand and fluctuating currencies are concerns, the 10 countries that make up the Association of Southeast Asian Nations are emerging as an economic hotspot. Leadership transitions are underway in the Philippines, which elects a new president on May 9; Myanmar, where reformer Aung San Suu Kyi leads a new government; and Vietnam, whose new leaders seek to accelerate growth. In Indonesia, the government of Joko Widodo is opening doors wider to foreign investment. What should investors be aware of amid these changes, and where can they find opportunity? Can ASEAN re-energize Asia's growth? This panel of experts will look at market dynamics and investment opportunities among ASEAN countries.
Moderator
Adam Schwarz, Founding Partner and CEO, Asia Group Advisors
Speakers
Dino Patti Djalal, Asia Fellow, Milken Institute; Founder, Foreign Policy Community of Indonesia
Henry Nguyen, Managing General Partner, IDG Ventures Vietnam; Chairman, Forbes Vietnam
Serge Pun, Executive Chairman, Serge Pun & Associates
Cesar Purisima, Secretary of Finance, Republic of the Philippines
Ravi Thakran, Managing Partner and Chairman, L Capital Asia; Group President, LVMH, South and Southeast Asia and Middle East
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Brighton
The challenges facing the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs--caring for wounded veterans coming home from Afghanistan and Iraq and meeting the needs of millions more who served in the Gulf War, Vietnam, Korea, World War II and elsewhere--are greater than ever. The frustrations over long wait times for non-urgent care that boiled over in 2014 have sparked major changes and have stirred improvements in treatment and outcomes for the nearly 8.8 million veterans cared for annually at the Veterans Health Administration's (VHA) 152 medical centers and 1,550 clinics and other facilities. Better management, reengineered systems and advances in technology are sparing patients unnecessary hospital stays. Home health technologies helped the VHA reduce hospital admissions by 35 percent and electronic patient records are realizing their potential. But great challenges remain. The VHA stands on the front lines of the battle to improve care for America's aging population and put patients first. This panel will explore the disruptive approaches, novel collaborations and promising advances taking root in a reenergized VHA.
Moderator
Jonathan Simons, President and CEO, Prostate Cancer Foundation; Senior Advisor, Milken Institute
Speakers
Matthew Collier, Senior Advisor to the Secretary for Strategic Partnerships, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
Magali Haas, CEO and President, Cohen Veterans Bioscience
Matthew Rettig, Chief, Hematology-Oncology, VA West Los Angeles; Professor of Medicine and Urology, University of California, Los Angeles
Mark Simon, Partner, Torreya Partners
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Board Room
This private session will bring together esteemed participants from the public and private sectors, including multinational executives, senior institutional and private equity investors, and government leaders to discuss ways to stimulate growth and improve commerce in fast-growing economies around the world.
Moderator
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Maple
A university degree has long been held up as the Holy Grail -- the best ticket to a meaningful career and a middle-class lifestyle. Yet an unprecedented level of student debt, which may never be repaid, is piling up, while companies report that they can't find enough qualified workers. Increasing numbers of students who enter college are simply not completing their degrees, and high school graduates and dropouts often find few opportunities for a productive career. This panel will discuss how traditional and Internet-based universities, governments and corporations can collaborate to close the skills gaps in our economy and provide young people with affordable career-development alternatives.
Moderator
Jeffrey Selingo, Author; Contributor, Washington Post; Professor of Practice, Arizona State University
Speakers
Michael Bennet, U.S. Senator, Colorado
Steven Knapp, President, George Washington University
Jessica Rosenworcel, Commissioner, Federal Communications Commission
Eric Spiegel, President and CEO, Siemens USA
Igor Tulchinsky, Founder and CEO, WorldQuant LLC
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Wilshire Ballroom
Join leaders of the U.S. Congress for a frank discussion about the challenges and opportunities they see for the remainder of the year and from a new administration in 2017. From foreign policy and national security to prospects for tax reform and economic growth and innovation, a vast array of policy priorities will be addressed when congressional leaders and David Rubenstein, co-CEO of the Carlyle Group, discuss the future of America.
Moderator
David Rubenstein, Co-Founder and Co-CEO, The Carlyle Group
Speakers
Bob Corker, U.S. Senator, Tennessee; Chairman, Committee on Foreign Relations
Kevin McCarthy, U.S. Representative, California; Majority Leader, U.S. House of Representatives
Mark Warner, U.S. Senator, Virginia
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Whittier Room
As the Internet of Things expands and our world becomes more and more connected, the most critical issue facing global businesses is cybersecurity. Breaches are inevitable. An estimated 50 percent of U.S. adults have had their personal information hacked. Over the past year, there has been an increase in attacks against major banking, health care, utility and consumer retail companies. And hackers are finding new opportunities as more consumers use mobile payment platforms. The governments of the U.S. and other nations have been a target. This panel of experts will explore ways of safeguarding consumers and better protecting businesses and national security, including the increasingly popular idea of "cyber resilience" -- the ability to recover from attacks more quickly and keep losses, both reputational and financial, to a minimum.
Moderator
James Kaplan, Partner, McKinsey & Co.
Speakers
Catherine Allen, Chairman and CEO, Santa Fe Group
Jonathan Kaltwasser, Deputy Director, Defensive Cyber Operations, Fleet Cyber Command, U.S. Navy
Tim Rains, Director, Security, Microsoft Corp.
Ray Rothrock, Chairman and CEO, RedSeal
Andrew Rubin, CEO and Co-Founder, Illumio
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Pavilion
As CEO of AARP, Jo Ann Jenkins leads the world's largest nonprofit organization. Focused on health, financial resilience and personal fulfillment, Jenkins' mission is to revolutionize society's views on aging and drive a new consciousness about the possibilities created by longevity. Her new book, "Disrupt Aging," praised by leaders from Sheryl Sandberg and Arianna Huffington to NASCAR champion Jeff Gordon, advocates lifelong exploration, the celebration of discovery over decline and the opportunity to live purposefully at every age. Longer and healthier life is one of humankind's greatest achievements, and Jenkins believes that each of us can realize its potential through change in attitude and action. Join Jenkins and award-winning journalist, news anchor and documentarian Soledad O'Brien for a compelling look at the future of aging.
Moderator
Soledad O'Brien, Journalist and CEO, Starfish Media Group
Speaker
Jo Ann Jenkins, CEO, AARP
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Canon
Technology is profoundly changing the way people live and work in emerging and developing regions. Innovations such as mobile banking, off-grid solar power and mobile clinics allow those at the bottom of the economic ladder to access finance, energy, health care, education and other vital services. But some experts fear uneven adoption may be widening global inequality, leaving millions without access to the kinds of jobs that can sustain long-term growth. They also worry about the capacity of schools in emerging markets to prepare 21st century workforces. This panel will bring together key actors to dissect technology's role in advancing or inhibiting economic development and look at steps the private and public sectors can take to ensure the digital revolution leaves no one behind.
Moderator
Paul Kedrosky, Partner and Co-Founder, SK Ventures
Speakers
Joe Mucheru, Cabinet Secretary, Ministry of Information, Communications and Technology, Government of Kenya
Denis D. O'Brien, Chairman and Principal Shareholder, Digicel Group
Hilton Romanski, Senior Vice President and Chief Strategy Officer, Cisco
Kentaro Toyama, W.K. Kellogg Associate Professor of Community Information, University of Michigan
Stephanie von Friedeburg, Chief Information Officer and Vice President, Information and Technology Solutions, World Bank Group
9:30 am - 10:30 am
International Gallery
As asset managers' role in financial intermediation has grown, so too has regulators' fear that their operations may contribute to marketwide instability. Whether systemic risk is created by asset management or merely "passes through" as a consequence of monetary policy or other factors is a point of contentious debate. In this private session, industry participants will share their views on the issues confronting asset managers from a marketwide perspective. Do certain strategies increase cross-asset correlations or result in herding behavior? What role can liquidity management programs play in preventing fire sales by investment funds?
Moderator
Claude Lopez, Director, Research, Milken Institute
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Beverly Hills Ballroom
A growing number of visionary business leaders worldwide are redefining "success" in the modern global economy. With a fresh eye, they have reevaluated their companies' roles in the context of promoting sustainability, transparency, environmental responsibility and positive social impact. This panel brings together leaders who are operating their businesses for profit while addressing some of the most pressing social and environmental problems. Have their strategies succeeded so far in effecting change? What are the greatest challenges they face? How do they navigate the most turbulent issues of our day? More broadly, what effect will these efforts have on the future of capitalism?
Moderator
Josh Barro, Senior Editor, Business Insider
Speakers
John Mackey, Co-Founder and Co-CEO, Whole Foods Market
Strive Masiyiwa, Founder and Chairman, Econet Wireless
Blake Mycoskie, Founder and Chief Shoe Giver, Toms
Kristin Groos Richmond, CEO and Co-Founder, Revolution Foods
9:30 am - 10:30 am
International Ballroom
Finding the best capital structure is a never-ending journey. It depends on financial market conditions, a company’s growth ambitions, regulatory rules and the economic backdrop. Taking on too much debt relative to equity can leave a company hamstrung, while avoiding debt at favorable times can mean missed opportunities for growth. Designing the best capital structure is both an art and a science, and the smartest managers understand their environment and draw from a broad range of financial tools worldwide. The challenge of getting the capital structure right has become critical now, with the global economy at a crossroads. After a surge in corporate borrowing since 2009, is now the time to rebuild liquidity? Is the use of debt to buy back stock still prudent — or does it risk shareholder backlash? How should managers anticipate interest rate, currency and equity market cycles in the U.S. and abroad to avoid getting caught with the wrong capital structure in the years ahead?
Moderator
Erik Schatzker, Anchor and Editor-at-Large, Bloomberg Television
Speakers
Joshua Friedman, Co-Founder, Co-Chairman and Co-CEO, Canyon Partners, LLC
Joshua Harris, Co-Founder and Member, Board of Directors, Apollo Global Management
Carey Lathrop, Managing Director and Global Head of Credit Markets, Citi
Jonathan Sokoloff, Managing Partner, Leonard Green & Partners
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Dayton
What does the Cancer Moonshot program offer to the cancer community that we haven't seen before? This panel will engage leading experts from key sectors and will highlight new developments in treatment, including immunotherapy, progress in offering up personalized approaches to treatment and the power of the patient to drive solutions forward. While U.S. cancer rates are declining, we have work to do to harness the power of prevention and medical research to its full potential.
Moderator
Kathy Hudson, Deputy Director for Science, Outreach and Policy, National Institutes of Health
Speakers
Anna Barker, Fellow, FasterCures, a Center of the Milken Institute; Director, National Biomarker Development Alliance, and Professor, Arizona State University
L. Michelle Bennett, Director, Center for Research Strategy, National Cancer Institute
Robert Bradway, Chairman and CEO, Amgen
Louis DeGennaro, President and CEO, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
Isla Garraway, Associate Professor and Director of Research, Department of Urology, University of California, Los Angeles
9:30 am - 10:30 am
International Terrace
Innovations in financial technology, both from within and beyond the financial services industry, are unleashing a wave of change that promises to transform every aspect of financial services. To compete, financial services providers need to move quickly and decisively to adopt new technologies and possibly change their business models -- or lose out to savvier peers or new, digital disruptors. What are the opportunities and risks, and do the benefits outweigh the costs? Can regulation keep pace with the speed at which technology evolves? This panel will feature some of the leading voices and technologists in financial services sharing their views about the future.
Moderator
Larry Tabb, Founder and CEO, TABB Group
Speakers
Corrie Elston, Chief Technology Officer, Financial Services, Google Cloud Platform
Adena Friedman, President and Chief Operating Officer, Nasdaq
Daniel Nadler, Founder and CEO, Kensho
David M. Siegel, Co-Chairman, Two Sigma
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Stardust
For decades, the idea of "socially responsible" investing centered on simply avoiding the stocks or bonds of companies judged harmful to society. But today much of social investing--or "impact investing"--is proactive, as investors seek to fund businesses that have specific social goals while also earning a profit. One recent study estimated that nearly $7 trillion in U.S. portfolios is invested with some kind of social aim: environmental sustainability, for example, or pro-worker policies. This private session will highlight some of the success stories of socially conscious entrepreneurs and focus on the pros and cons of popular social investment vehicles including legally chartered "benefit corporations," socially pledged "B Corps." and microlenders.
Moderator
Caitlin MacLean, Director, Innovative Finance, Milken Institute
Speakers
Will Fitzpatrick, Counselor to The Omidyar Group
Kerry Kennedy, President, Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights
Sahil Kini, Principal, Aspada Investments
Flory Wilson, Director, Measure What Matters Initiative, B Lab
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Pavilion
The world is a dangerous place these days. No one knows that better than two of America's most decorated military leaders -- Adm. Michael Mullen, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Gen. Stanley McChrystal, former head of the Joint Special Operations Command. In this talk, the two will discuss the many challenges facing the United States and its allies around the world, from ISIS and the Middle East to Russia's military adventures and China's claim to disputed islands in the South China Sea. They'll discuss how America should respond to these challenges and whether the U.S. military is fully prepared to win on multiple fronts, from air assaults to special operations. And how should we restructure the military for the 21st century? Finding the right answers to these important questions could well determine how peaceful the world will be in the years to come.
Moderator
Susan Eisenhower, Chairman and CEO, Eisenhower Group, Inc.
Speakers
Stanley McChrystal, Managing Partner, McChrystal Group; General, U.S. Army (Ret.)
Michael Mullen, Senior Advisor, Providence Equity Partners; Former Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Oakhurst
Speaker
Mohamed El-Erian, Chief Economic Advisor, Allianz; Chair, President’s Global Development Council
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Maple
More than half a century after historic breakthroughs in civil rights, minorities in the U.S. continue to be unfairly burdened by a consistent lack of access to opportunity. On one hand, minorities today are more likely than ever to participate in the highest levels of society, yet in our communities, inordinate numbers are jobless, live in poverty or earn far less than their privileged counterparts. They also own fewer businesses and homes and have lower graduation rates. Such disparities are one of the unwelcome legacies of systemic discrimination, and they pose a serious threat to a thriving democracy. This session will explore the dynamics of discrimination, including the collective cost we all pay when entire segments of a population are marginalized. How do these social ills impede progress and opportunity, and what ideas hold the most promise for creating pathways to prosperity for the disenfranchised?
Moderator
Felix Salmon, Senior Editor, Fusion
Speakers
Cheryl Dorsey, President, Echoing Green
Ed Foster-Simeon, President and CEO, U.S. Soccer Foundation
Andrea Hoffman, CEO, Culture Shift Labs
Rosie Rios, Treasurer of the United States
Jose Antonio Vargas, Founder, Define American; Founder and Editor, #EmergingUS
10:45 am - 11:45 am
International Terrace
It doesn't take a genius to know that the digital revolution has overturned the world order. With connected homes, self-driving cars, robotics, social media and more data being produced in a day than in the entire history of humankind, digital technologies are not only creating exciting new products and companies, they're also disrupting industries as never before. Technology life cycles are shorter than ever, and companies that don't keep up risk quickly falling behind. Traditional approaches no longer work. Ask CEOs to identify their most urgent concerns and most will tell you that finding ways to leverage technology to stay competitive is near the top of their list. So how do companies and CEOs survive this digital Darwinism? What are the keys to not only surviving but thriving in the digital age?
Moderator
Andy Serwer, Vice President and Editor-in-Chief, Yahoo Finance
Speakers
Nikesh Arora, President and Chief Operating Officer, SoftBank Corp.
John Chen, Executive Chairman and CEO, BlackBerry
David Cote, Chairman and CEO, Honeywell
Sallie Krawcheck, CEO and Co-Founder, Ellevest; Chair, Ellevate Network
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Wilshire Ballroom
In this session, leading U.S. governors will discuss critical issues facing their states, including jobs, transportation, education, health care and economic development.
Moderator
Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman, Alphabet
Speakers
John Hickenlooper, Governor, Colorado
Terry McAuliffe, Governor, Virginia
Rick Scott, Governor, Florida
Scott Walker, Governor, Wisconsin
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Stardust
With the global financial system evolving at warp speed, every second counts. Financial services have changed more since 2000 than they had since the Great Depression. One challenge is marshaling resources to handle trading ups and downs, which can swing from 30 billion one session to 120 billion the next. A traditional fixed-hardware IT solution can leave millions of dollars of equipment idle for days on end. Moving to the cloud can help. In this private session, top financial executives will reveal how firms are restructuring operations to respond to new risks, regulatory requirements and mounting cost pressures.
Moderator
Steven Drobny, Founder and CEO, Drobny Capital; Founder, Clocktower Technology Ventures
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Whittier Room
The U.S. national debt is expected to reach 75 percent of GDP this year, having risen from less than 40 percent in 2008 before the financial crisis and recession. Even while global demand for dollar assets has allowed the United States to fund itself at low rates, with the debt now approaching $20 trillion and interest rates expected to rise, fiscal pressures are likely to reemerge as a central policy concern for the next President. At the same time, many Republicans and Democrats alike agree that the U.S. tax code is badly in need of a makeover to address fairness, efficiency, and simplicity -- even while the two sides disagree on the changes to be made. The rash of corporate "inversions" by which U.S. corporations have moved their official headquarters abroad to escape U.S. taxes, and the Treasury Department's steps to curb such moves, further illustrate the importance of tax reform. How should the tax code be rewritten to provide a competitive landscape for U.S. companies without increasing the federal deficit? And what is the right long-term approach to dealing with the debt? The future of the U.S. economy depends on the answers.
Moderator
Ben White, Chief Economic Correspondent and Columnist, Politico
Speakers
Maya MacGuineas, President, Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget; Head, Campaign to Fix the Debt
David Perdue, U.S. Senator, Georgia
Mark Warner, U.S. Senator, Virginia
Mark Weinberger, Global Chairman and CEO, EY
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Beverly Hills Ballroom
Ray Dalio believes that the most effective way to create meaningful work and meaningful relationships is through an idea meritocracy in which everyone speaks frankly and operations are open to scrutiny. That way, we can openly explore what is true -- including what's true about people's mistakes and weaknesses -- and can work through disagreements in an orderly way. This unique culture, operating for more than 40 years, has led Bridgewater to become the largest hedge fund firm in the world. Join Dalio to learn what inspired him to create a radically truthful and transparent culture, the challenges and benefits of this approach, and how it can be applied to other organizations. He will be joined onstage by Robert Kegan, Harvard professor of psychology, who has studied Bridgewater extensively and is the author of the recently published book, "An Everyone Culture," which features Bridgewater and other organizations designed to help employees use errors and vulnerabilities as opportunities for personal and company growth.
Moderator
Robert Kegan, Meehan Professor of Adult Learning and Professional Development, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Speaker
Raymond Dalio, Founder, Chairman and Co-Chief Investment Officer, Bridgewater Associates
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Dayton
It's been called clean energy's Holy Grail -- one with an almost inexhaustible source of fuel: hydrogen. For decades they've been talking about it, with the result being a lot more hype than fusion. Billions of dollars have been spent on nuclear fusion projects, without much to show for it. But the game may be changing. In recent years, startup companies capitalized by well-known investors such as Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen and PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel have taken on the quest for nuclear fusion, adopting a Silicon Valley mindset of "move fast, fail fast" that doesn't require government grants or giant infrastructure. For these bold scientists with a knack for thinking outside the box and taking risks, and for private investors who are willing to back them and take a gamble on saving the planet, fusion energy might be just around the corner, not decades away. These fusion startups are moving many times faster than publicly funded research ever could, often at much lower cost. Will this budding private sector and its new research approaches be a game changer? Has nuclear fusion's time finally arrived?
Moderator
Katie Fehrenbacher, Senior Writer, Fortune
Speakers
Michl Binderbauer, Chief Technology Officer, Tri Alpha Energy
Michel Laberge, Founder and Chief Science Officer, General Fusion
Thomas McGuire, Research Engineer and Scientist; Compact Fusion Principal Investigator, Lockheed Martin
Dennis Whyte, Director, Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT
10:45 am - 11:45 am
International Gallery
This private session will cover today's major themes in credit markets and structured finance products. Which areas of the credit market present the greatest opportunities or pose the largest risks? Will credit default swaps make a comeback, or are there other instruments with better potential to hedge credit risk? How are loan markets reacting to regulations that affect collateralized loan obligations, and how will issuers proceed? This off-the-record conversation will explore these questions and other major issues affecting the industry.
Moderator
Tracy Alloway, Executive Editor, Bloomberg Markets
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Canon
Are humans becoming so dependent on their smartphones, tablets and laptops that they're losing the ability to relate to one another? Not only does work relentlessly seep into our personal lives, but many of us have begun to prefer emotionally safe, if impersonal, encounters via a device rather than the complexity of face-to-face human interaction. What does this new tech-dominated world mean for our society and for the future of human relationships? Will tomorrow's generations be able to discern the nuances of real conversation? Will they catch the meaning conveyed by a passing glance? Does a world in which we look at screens instead of faces threaten our humanity? Does it prepare us to take robots as emotional companions?
Moderator
Alex Witt, Anchor, MSNBC's "Weekends with Alex Witt"; Correspondent, NBC News
Speakers
Genevieve Bell, Vice President of Corporate Strategy and Senior Fellow, Intel Corp.
Linda Burch, Co-Founder and Chief Education and Strategy Officer, Common Sense Media
Sherry Turkle, Author; Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Sam Yagan, Vice Chairman, Match Group; Co-Founder, OkCupid
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Brighton
Powerful forces, including shifting demographics, climate change and advances in robotics, are reshaping our world. Combined with record-low yields in financial markets, they are prompting some investors to take a closer look at thematic investing -- the practice of targeting companies and markets based on broad changes in the world. Which of today's big trends offer the best value for investors, and how sustainable are they? How does one turn a broad theme, such as genomics or 3-D printing, into an investment? How do institutional investors consider multi-class portfolios in asset allocation? The experts on this panel will discuss the practical challenges and benefits of taking a thematic lens to investment portfolios spanning several asset classes.
Moderator
Stephen Foley, U.S. Investment Correspondent, Financial Times
Speakers
Victor Chu, Chairman, First Eastern Investment Group
Taimur Hyat, Chief Strategy Officer, PGIM, the Global Investment Management Businesses of Prudential Financial, Inc.
Catherine Keating, President and CEO, Commonfund
Rebecca Patterson, Managing Director and Chief Investment Officer, Bessemer Trust Cos.
Mike Ramsay, Partner and Chief Investment Officer, Global Credit, Generation Investment Management
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Palm
In modern times, both developed and emerging economies have demonstrated a positive relationship between financial sector deepening and GDP growth. Capital markets provide a critical mechanism for channeling savings to the businesses that can most effectively provide the goods and services that society values as well as employ its citizens. Across developing regions, businesses have identified access to finance as the largest barrier to their success. According to the World Bank's Enterprise Survey, this concern outweighs corruption, access to electricity and political instability. Yet exposure to international capital flows has also brought balance of payments challenges and macroeconomic volatility to emerging markets. How can policymakers in these nations meet financing needs while mitigating their exposure to external shocks? How can they balance private sector financing with investor protection? And what are the tradeoffs between developing domestic institutions and creating an environment in which capital markets can be accessed internationally?
Moderator
Staci Warden, Executive Director, Center for Financial Markets, Milken Institute
Speakers
Afsaneh Beschloss, Founder, President and CEO, The Rock Creek Group
Ermias Eshetu, CEO, Ethiopia Commodity Exchange
Claver Gatete, Minister of Finance and Economic Planning, Republic of Rwanda
Hua Jingdong , Vice President and Treasurer, International Finance Corp.
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Stardust
Hosted by Lowell Milken, this interactive lunch discussion will focus on solutions to challenges in the K-12 and post-secondary education systems. Milken, founder of the National Institute for Excellence in Teaching and co-founder and chairman of the Milken Family Foundation, will join leaders in business and philanthropy for an invitation-only dialogue with some of America's foremost educators and government officials.
Moderator
Lowell Milken, Co-Founder and Chairman, Milken Family Foundation
Speakers
Michael Adams, Chancellor, Pepperdine University; President Emeritus, University of Georgia
Gene Block, Chancellor, University of California, Los Angeles
Ronald Daniels, President, Johns Hopkins University
Pradeep Khosla, Chancellor, University of California, San Diego
Steve Klinsky, Founder and CEO, New Mountain Capital
Jessica Rosenworcel, Commissioner, Federal Communications Commission
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
International Ballroom
What will it be like to be human a century from now? Will 100- or even 120-year lifespans be commonplace as disease is tamed by gene editing and precision medicine? Will technology render many jobs obsolete, creating a society of leisure - and unemployment? Will climate change permanently alter our planet's ecosystem? Will computers take over many of the tasks we humans now perform on a daily basis? One thing is certain: Science and technology are advancing at a mind-boggling pace, and advances such as these -- once considered fantasy -- now appear to be within reach. To underscore this year's Global Conference theme, "The Future of Humankind," the Milken Institute has dedicated this lunch session to hearing from some of the world's most forward-thinking leaders on what we can expect in the coming century. These advances hold incredible promise, but be prepared for unintended consequences.
Introduction By
Michael Klowden, President and CEO, Milken Institute
Speakers
Guruduth Banavar, Vice President and Chief Science Officer, Cognitive Computing, IBM
Jennifer Doudna, Professor of Chemistry and of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Al Gore, Chairman, Generation Investment Management; Former U.S. Vice President
Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman, Alphabet
12:15 pm - 2:00 pm
Whittier Room
Wayne Gretzky -- winner of four Stanley Cups and widely considered the greatest hockey player of all time -- was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999. Joe Torre -- who as manager guided the Yankees to four World Series titles and was a nine-time All-Star as a player -- was honored at Cooperstown in 2014. Sports and media legend Peter Guber owns stakes in teams including the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Golden State Warriors -- the latter broke more than a dozen NBA records this season. These icons will discuss the changes underway in their respective leagues and across all major sports. The era of free agents without loyalty to one team, combined with salary caps, powerful players' unions and lucrative broadcast contracts, has reshaped the operating model for team owners. The evolution of media, from broadcast to cable to pay-per-view to the Web, is transforming revenue streams and opening sports to new international opportunities. And demographic shifts in the United States confront leagues with challenges in cultivating tomorrow's diehard fans. Hear their thoughts on how sports and players have changed over the decades and what's in store for the future.
Moderator
Jim Gray, Sportscaster, Showtime, Fox and WestwoodOne Radio
Speakers
Wayne Gretzky, Former Player and Head Coach, NHL; Member, Hockey Hall of Fame
Peter Guber, Chairman and CEO, Mandalay Entertainment; Owner and Co-Executive Chairman, Golden State Warriors
Joe Torre, Chief Baseball Officer, Major League Baseball, Office of the Commissioner
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Oakhurst
Moderator
Alan Schwartz, Executive Chairman, Guggenheim Partners LLC
Speaker
Nikesh Arora, President and Chief Operating Officer, SoftBank Corp.
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Beverly Hills Ballroom
It was fun to watch IBM's Watson beat a human on "Jeopardy" in 2011, and we smiled when Apple's Siri answered her first question. But as computers and machines become more powerful, faster and able to make decisions on their own, is this brave new world of artificial intelligence a triumph of human ingenuity or, as some fear, the beginning of the end of humankind? Some of the world's most influential figures warn that artificial intelligence could advance to the point where we can no longer control it. They call for regulatory oversight, strict ethical guidelines and a ban on superintelligent computers. Others say such concerns are vastly overblown, that we are hundreds of years from having computers that are more intelligent than humans and that the benefits to society vastly outweigh the potential downsides. This session will explore the latest advances in AI and try to answer the question: beneficial or malevolent?
Moderator
Alexandra Suich, U.S. Technology Editor, the Economist
Speakers
Guruduth Banavar, Vice President and Chief Science Officer, Cognitive Computing, IBM
Michael Ferro, Founder, Chairman and CEO, Merrick Ventures
Stuart Russell, Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley; Vice Chair, World Economic Forum Council on AI and Robotics
David M. Siegel, Co-Chairman, Two Sigma
Shivon Zilis, Partner and Founding Member, Bloomberg Beta
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Brighton
With the Summer Olympics just months away, host country Brazil will soon be attracting the eyes of the world. But the optimism that blossomed when Rio de Janeiro was awarded the Games back in 2009 has wilted amid political and economic turmoil. Recession has struck Latin America's largest country amid weak commodity prices and rising unemployment. As well, the corruption scandal involving state-controlled oil giant Petrobras has shaken the upper echelons of politics, blurring the future of President Dilma Rousseff herself. Against this backdrop, there are growing doubts that the nation will be ready for the Olympics come August. Yet Brazil remains a powerful, resource-rich country with tremendous capacity for agriculture, manufacturing and trade. What will it take to restore confidence and right Brazil's course? Which industries hold the greatest long-term promise? What does the nation's fortunes mean for the global economy?
Moderator
Cate Ambrose, President and Executive Director, Latin American Private Equity & Venture Capital Association
Speakers
Flavia Buarque de Almeida, Managing Director, Peninsula Participações S.A.
Renato Lulia-Jacob, CEO, Itaú BBA International
Mario Mesquita, Senior Partner and Institutional Relations Director, Brasil Plural
Piero Minardi, Managing Director, Warburg Pincus do Brasil
Tom Tull, Chief Investment Officer, Employees Retirement System of Texas
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
International Ballroom
Risk and uncertainty have grown so much over the past year that corporate leaders now place security and political unpredictability high on their list of concerns. From Russia and the Middle East to Africa and Asia, terrorist attacks and the ongoing threat from ISIS create not only security worries but add to increasing fears about global markets. While the list of trouble spots has grown, U.S. military involvement has declined in some of the world's most volatile regions. Among the most immediate concerns: Russia, which continues to support militants in eastern Ukraine and President Bashar al-Assad in Syria; Iran, which, free of sanctions, provides military support to conflicts in the region; Asia, where territorial disputes in the China Sea linger and North Korea continues to test nuclear weapons; and ISIS. Add the uncertainty caused by the drop in oil prices, China's slowdown and unpredictable political elections and you have a cauldron of risks creating worry among investors, CEOs and government leaders. Listen as a panel of experts considers which pose the greatest threat and what leaders can do to contain them.
Moderator
Michael Crowley, Senior Foreign Affairs Correspondent, Politico
Speakers
Wesley Clark, Chairman and CEO, Wesley K. Clark & Associates; U.S. Army General (Ret.) and Former Supreme Allied Commander, NATO
Bob Corker, U.S. Senator, Tennessee; Chairman, Committee on Foreign Relations
Niall Ferguson, Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History, Harvard University; Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University
Jane Harman, Director, President and CEO, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Former Congresswoman
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Wilshire Ballroom
Activist investors are regularly in the headlines as they challenge how companies are run to enhance shareholder value. With "activism" now a common term within the financial community, its meaning has become blurred amid the profusion of styles and approaches. Some investors question whether activists are good for the companies they target or for other shareholders. So what does it mean to be an activist today, and what is the best way to understand their numerous strategies? This panel will discuss the pros and cons of the latest activist wave. What are the typical issues that activists target? How are the various styles of activism faring in the current environment? And are hedge fund activists finding support from pensions funds and other institutional investor clients?
Moderator
David Faber, Journalist and Co-Anchor, CNBC
Speakers
Gene Lee, President and CEO, Darden Restaurants Inc.
Raymond J. McGuire, Global Head, Corporate and Investment Banking, Citi
Clifton Robbins, Founder and CEO, Blue Harbour Group LP
Anne Sheehan, Director, Corporate Governance, California State Teachers' Retirement System
Jeffrey Smith, Managing Member, CEO and Chief Investment Officer, Starboard Value LP
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Canon
Using the skills of different generations of workers is critical to increasing business results and bottom-line impact. Each generation brings a distinct set of values to the workplace. The most effective and successful organizations foster and leverage the diverse assets that a multigenerational workforce provides to gain a competitive advantage. This interactive panel will bring together Gen X and Gen Y leaders who will discuss the value and nuances of different generational perspectives, especially as they relate to women. They will also help attendees see ways to utilize the skills of different generations to leverage individual strengths and achieve organizational strength.
Moderator
Patsy Doerr, Global Head, Corporate Responsibility and Inclusion, Thomson Reuters
Speakers
Amy Friedrich, Senior Vice President, Specialty Benefits Division, Principal Financial Group
Julie Sweet, CEO, North America, Accenture
Eric Termuende, Co-Founder and Director, Gen Y Inc.
Aniela Unguresan, Co-Founder, EDGE Certified Foundation
Ahu Yildirmaz, Vice President, Market Insights and Head, ADP Research Institute
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Board Room
The Internet can help solve some of the toughest challenges in emerging regions by providing access to information, overcoming isolation and offering economic opportunity. From mobile banking to off-grid energy, new technologies are enabling emerging countries to bypass, or "leapfrog," traditional development challenges. Cutting-edge technology is producing innovative solutions in health, financial services, energy, education, retail and more. To help implement the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals and advance the benefits of digital technology to emerging countries, the World Bank is launching the Digital Development Partnership (DDP). As digital progress is fast, primarily driven by the private sector driven and characterized by a high degree of experimentation, DDP will focus on sharing best practices among World Bank Group developing country clients and integrating private-sector knowledge, solutions and business models. During the preparation phase, the World Bank seeks comment from potential partners on strategic orientation and priority topics to be covered in the DDP work program for the next three to five years.
Moderator
Stephanie von Friedeburg, Chief Information Officer and Vice President, Information and Technology Solutions, World Bank Group
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Pavilion
Clean water, electricity and good health care are among the most basic of human needs, yet about 3 billion people live without them. Philanthropist and entrepreneur Manoj Bhargava, the mastermind behind the 5-Hour Energy drink and founder of Stage 2 Innovations, has devoted his time and substantial wealth to a search for ways to meet the fundamental needs of the world's poor. This session will feature an interactive discussion about Bhargava's quest and will include a demonstration of one of his most innovative creations, Free Electric, a stationary bike that can deliver a day's worth of clean power to a rural household with a single hour of pedaling.
Moderator
Sheryl WuDunn, Co-Founder, FullSky Capital; Co-Author, "China Wakes" and "A Path Appears"
Speaker
Manoj Bhargava, Founder and CEO, Stage 2 Innovations and Living Essentials
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Maple
Despite highly visible and well-funded efforts to improve public education in the United States, significant challenges remain. Only one-third of American children are proficient in math and reading, and just over half of African-American and Latino students are able to read by fourth grade. Parents, educators and business leaders continue to search for better methods and the right partnerships to educate children and prepare adults for the workplace. What reform efforts are working? Is the K-12 system adequately preparing students for higher education? Are increasingly expensive universities providing enough bang for the buck? Can the graduation gap for minority students -- in regard to both high school and college -- be closed? Are schools of education producing enough quality teachers for Americans to compete for good jobs? How are universities meeting student remediation needs, addressing the mountains of student debt and implementing online curricula? This panel of outspoken education experts will tackle these tough topics and more, propose remedies and identify avenues for business and philanthropic leaders to make an impact.
Moderator
Lowell Milken, Co-Founder and Chairman, Milken Family Foundation
Speakers
Michael Crow, President, Arizona State University
Nicholas Dirks, Chancellor, University of California, Berkeley
Eva Moskowitz, Founder and CEO, Success Academy Charter Schools
Kristan Van Hook, Senior Vice President, Public Policy and Development, National Institute for Excellence in Teaching
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Palm
The Russian economy is under pressure. Against the current backdrop of continued economic sanctions, low energy prices, a devaluing currency and an unresolved military conflict with its biggest neighbor, Ukraine, panelists will discuss the viability of the Russian economy and outline where Russia goes from here. What opportunities lie within the country and do its historically strong energy and commodity sectors offer opportunities for international investors? How are local financial markets coping under such pressure, and which sectors call for optimism? Finally, how does the political landscape look and will Russia repair its relationship with the West -- or turn away and look east for continued strengthening of strategic cooperation?
Moderator
Alexander Kovaler, Founder and Chairman, AK Russia Advisers, LLC
Speakers
Erik Berglöf, Director, Institute of Global Affairs, London School of Economics
Mark Garber, Senior Partner and Chairman, GHP Group
Steven Hellman, Former CEO, Russia and Commonwealth of Independent States, Credit Suisse
Maxim Oreshkin, Deputy Minister of Finance, Russian Federation
Ernest Rudyak, Chairman and CEO, Engeocom Trust
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Whittier Room
The near-collapse of the financial system in 2008 drove governments and central banks to launch unprecedented cooperative policies and regulations to prevent a greater catastrophe. Eight years later, it's clear the world economy avoided another depression. But with global growth weakening again and fresh upheaval in stock, bond and commodity markets, policymakers face a deepening debate over the effectiveness of their actions -- and what they should do next. As the financial system faces new strains, major central banks are undertaking contradictory policies, with the Federal Reserve tightening credit while many of its peers ease further -- even fostering negative nominal interest rates in Europe and Japan. The turn of events raises more questions about financial system risks and how to contain them. Which policies have been the most effective, with the least collateral damage? What role, if any, do central banks and finance ministries have in managing asset prices? Can systemic risks truly be reduced or eliminated, or merely shifted, thereby masking underlying problems? Our panel of experts will offer their views of recent history and the complex moment we find ourselves in.
Moderator
Scarlet Fu, Anchor, Bloomberg
Speakers
Dimitri Demekas, Assistant Director, Monetary and Capital Markets Department, International Monetary Fund
Fiona Frick, CEO, Unigestion
Michael Piwowar, Commissioner, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
Paul Sheard, Executive Vice President and Chief Economist, S&P Global
John C. Williams, President and CEO, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Dayton
The Milken Institute is proud to support the Morgan Stanley Sustainable Investing Challenge, the preeminent global impact investing competition for graduate business students. Focused on both financial and social returns, impact investing is growing rapidly. Investors are hungry for opportunities and participants now include many of the world's most astute investors who see winning strategies combining their capital and their values. Some of the most exciting impact opportunities are being developed by a new generation of social entrepreneurs creating market-based solutions to large-scale global challenges. Be ready with your questions for the Sustainable Investing Challenge winning team and join us for a stimulating, interactive panel to learn how these future leaders are changing the face of impact investing.
Moderator
Paul Irving, Chairman, Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging; Distinguished Scholar in Residence, Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California
Speakers
Ryan Alam, Co-Founder, Terra Limpa
Suzana Amoes, Co-Founder, Terra Limpa
Dave Chen, CEO, Equilibrium Capital Group
Megan Strawther, Co-Founder, Terra Limpa
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
International Terrace
The proposed 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is the biggest trade agreement in a generation. If approved by all signatories, it will affect nearly 40 percent of the global economy, from Vietnam to Chile to Canada. The document touches on everything from e-commerce to agriculture to financial services. President Obama has made the TPP, designed to boost U.S. economic growth and further trade integration across the Pacific region, one of the major initiatives of his administration. The TPP must now be approved by each of the 12 signatory nations; in the U.S. that means approval by Congress, where serious debate is expected. In this session, U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman, who led the successful negotiations for the TPP, will offer his perspectives and discuss the path forward for this historic agreement.
Moderator
Ben White, Chief Economic Correspondent and Columnist, Politico
Speaker
Michael Froman, United States Trade Representative
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
International Gallery
As more industries employ artificial intelligence, it is becoming increasingly invisible and integrated into our day-to-day lives. AI is deeply embedded in our economic infrastructure, and the applications seem endless: Financial institutions rely on it for stock trading and fraud prevention; doctors and hospitals depend on it for diagnoses; it's what makes driverless cars get where they're going. This private session will explore what's next for AI and the many benefits it presents for the most innovative enterprises.
Moderator
Shivon Zilis, Partner and Founding Member, Bloomberg Beta
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Palm
By 2030, an estimated two-thirds of the global middle class will live in the Asia-Pacific region. As affluence expands there, it could disrupt what has been a huge flow of Asian students to foreign universities and other higher-learning institutions. Traditionally, many middle- and upper-class Asian families have looked to universities outside the region for the best possible postsecondary education. California has been a major beneficiary of this trend. China and India combined contribute more than 40 percent of the international students at U.S. and Australian universities and more than 20 percent of those at UK universities. Now, as countries in Asia work toward achieving advanced-economy status, will the region's educational institutions compete aggressively to keep more of their homegrown students? How will foreign universities continue to attract Asian students? Will U.S. universities look to change curricula, stress new skill sets or alter tuition to make themselves more appealing to Asian families?
Moderator
Kirk Wagar, U.S. Ambassador to Singapore
Speakers
Gene Block, Chancellor, University of California, Los Angeles
Brian Rogove, CEO, Asia-Pacific, Cognita
Thomas Rosenbaum, President and Professor of Physics, California Institute of Technology
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Dayton
The cost of some medicines captured headlines in 2015, and not just because of the price-raising antics of former Turing Pharmaceuticals CEO Martin Shkreli. Exciting new treatments are coming out of the pipelines of biopharmaceutical companies, some of which promise cures for debilitating diseases and durable treatments for difficult cancers. But advances can have significant costs, and products that come with a high price tag don't always feel like progress. Are we as a society appropriately defining the value these treatments provide? Can new payment models help maintain affordability and access for patients who need them? What are policymakers doing to influence pricing, and is it likely to have any impact?
Moderator
Caroline Pearson, Senior Vice President, Avalere Health
Speakers
Gregg Alton, Executive Vice President, Corporate and Medical Affairs, Gilead Sciences
Peter Bach, Director, Center for Health Policy and Outcomes, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Anthony Barrueta, Senior Vice President, Government Relations, Kaiser Permanente
Roy Beveridge, Chief Medical Officer, Humana
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Whittier Room
We've all heard about smart, driverless cars, and in the near future such vehicles could be as commonplace as GPS. What are the newest innovations in driverless technology? And what about the latest technology that can also make us better, smarter drivers? Long before autonomous cars take over our highways, we will see innovations aimed at eliminating bad habits that cause costly and often deadly collisions. Take, for example, monitors that track eye and head movements to determine whether the driver is watching the road, or a gear shift knob that can read blood-alcohol levels from a sweaty palm. One company is even developing sensors for the steering wheel that can tell if a driver is having a heart attack. These innovations and more are within reach, but will they guarantee our safety? Moreover, because they track and store data, what will be the impact on privacy? And how will our current infrastructure accommodate these cars of the future?
Moderator
Sue Callaway, Senior Editor, Automotive, Time Inc.; Founder and CEO, the Auto 100
Speakers
Chris Ballinger, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Toyota Financial Services
Brian Kelly, Secretary, California State Transportation Agency
Doug Newcomb, President and Founder, C3 Group; Journalist
Raj Rajkumar, George Westinghouse Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University
Juraj Vaculik, CEO and Co-Founder, AeroMobil
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Pavilion
From ex-CEOs to ex-presidential candidates, the global landscape is littered with once-incredibly influential people who lost their way because they didn't understand the power of effective communication. With the rise of the omnipresent news cycle, eloquence and persuasiveness have never been more important -- or more misunderstood. In this session, well-known pollster and political strategist Frank Luntz will discuss the most impactful words, visuals, tools and techniques that will give you the edge in public settings and private meetings.
Speaker
Frank Luntz, Founder and President, Luntz Global
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Brighton
Is conventional warfare -- with set piece battles fought with tanks, artillery and massed troops -- a thing of the past? In the 21st century, the rules of engagement appear to have changed. Wars today are defined by terrorist attacks and small, irregular forces that rely on cellphones, the Internet and fanatical dedication as much as guns and explosives. In this kind of war, winning mind share can be as important as capturing cities. And it is forcing conventional armies to regroup and rethink strategy and tactics. In this session, a panel of military and political experts will address the key issues surrounding this new type of warfare. How can the U.S. adapt and balance the need for both conventional and nonconventional capabilities? What role will special operations forces play? Are they, along with air power, the best tools for fighting hybrid forces such as ISIS? How can Silicon Valley and the technology sector contribute? What is going on in military R&D that could dramatically help militaries win in this new generation of warfare?
Moderator
Matthew Spence, Partner, Andreessen Horowitz; Former U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Middle East Policy
Speakers
Henry Crumpton, Chairman and CEO, Crumpton Group; Former Ambassador-at-Large and Coordinator for Counterterrorism, U.S. State Department
Geoffrey Ling, Professor, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences; CEO, SunQ LLC
Pippa Malmgren, Founder, DRPM Group; Advisor, British Ministry of Defense
Yasuhide Nakayama, Member, House of Representatives, Japan; Former State Minister for Foreign Affairs, Japan
Juan Carlos Pinzón, Ambassador of Colombia to the United States
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Wilshire Ballroom
In the U.S., the average income of the top 1 percent is roughly 30 times that of the typical American. Income inequality is clearly a complex issue that sparks visceral debates from all sides. On one hand, it is argued that higher taxes on the wealthy and a higher minimum wage would stunt job growth. On the other, experts contend that if this issue is not addressed, the shrinking middle class will continue to diminish, creating more poverty and economic stagnation. Thomas Piketty writes that the ratio of private wealth to national income in developed countries is on the rise, approaching levels never seen before. Does income inequality truly threaten a nation's social and economic stability? What role, if any, should government play in addressing this issue, and how can we ensure that real opportunities exist for people at all socioeconomic levels?
Moderator
Alan Schwartz, Executive Chairman, Guggenheim Partners LLC
Speakers
Jared Bernstein, Economic Policy Fellow, Milken Institute; Senior Fellow, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities; Former Chief Economist to Vice President Joe Biden
Douglas Holtz-Eakin, President, American Action Forum; Former Director, Congressional Budget Office; Former Chief Economist, Council of Economic Advisers
Garrett Neiman, Co-Founder and CEO, CollegeSpring
Sarah Rosen Wartell, President, Urban Institute
Darren Walker, President, Ford Foundation
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Maple
The voices of Latinas are growing louder. Latinas in the U.S. control $1.3 trillion in buying power and most often are the heads of households and principal breadwinners in their families. As a result, leading companies such as Maybelline and Revlon are targeting pitches and products more directly to the needs and preferences of Latina consumers. But their influence doesn't -- and shouldn't -- stop there. More Latinas are beginning to realize that they can use their economic clout to demand improvements in education, health care and environmental protections, and to create new economic opportunities. Participants on this panel will suggest ways to leverage the untapped power of the Latina.
Moderator
Giselle Fernandez, Television journalist, producer and filmmaker
Speakers
Julie Ann Crommett, Entertainment Industry Educator-in-Chief, Google
Mónica Gil, Senior Vice President and General Manager, Multicultural Growth and Strategy, Nielsen
David Hayes-Bautista, Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Director, Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles
Nina Vaca, Chairman and CEO, Pinnacle Group; Chairman Emeritus, U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
International Terrace
The popularity of mobile technology is transforming the way we live, and the way we behave as consumers. Amazon estimates that 70 percent of its holiday-season traffic came from mobile devices, a figure that illustrates our growing reliance on smartphones. But revenue from mobile traffic, for Amazon and others, does not yet reflect that enormous surge in audience engagement. Whether the challenge is creating revenue streams from content flow, or optimizing user-based data, or transitioning users into customers, experts believe that monetizing mobile remains the strongest growth opportunity in the digital ecosphere. What are the best practices in this space, and what disruptions lie ahead? Will a company's ability to monetize mobile ultimately determine its success or failure in the coming decade?
Moderator
Kara Swisher, Executive Editor, Re/code
Speakers
Andrew Appel, President and CEO, IRI
Carolyn Everson, Vice President, Global Marketing Solutions, Facebook
Jenny Lee, Managing Partner, GGV Capital
Spencer Rascoff, CEO, Zillow Group
Sam Yagan, Vice Chairman, Match Group; Co-Founder, OkCupid
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
International Ballroom
The U.S. private equity business had a big year in 2015, recording the highest dollar volume of company buyout deals since 2007 -- $139 billion nationwide, according to Dealogic. But dealmakers once again found themselves squeezed by deep-pocketed corporate buyers seeking growth via takeovers. The result: Private equity buyouts accounted for just 6 percent of total U.S. takeover activity last year, down from 14 percent in 2013. The numbers suggest that private equity firms are angling in a shrinking pool of good buyout candidates. That's raising questions about the industry's ability to maintain its high historical returns from engineering buyouts and restructuring the companies for later sale. This panel of P-E titans will address some of the major challenges facing the industry as well as the opportunities. Is competition driving industry stalwarts to compete in different asset arenas? What are the key elements of successful deals, and how are they changing? Are holding periods for company investments getting longer or shorter, and is there room for investments to be held into perpetuity?
Moderator
Andrea Kramer, Managing Director, Hamilton Lane
Speakers
Leon Black, Chairman, CEO and Director, Apollo Global Management
Jonathan Nelson, Founder and CEO, Providence Equity Partners
David Rubenstein, Co-Founder and Co-CEO, The Carlyle Group
Robert Smith, Founder, Chairman and CEO, Vista Equity Partners; Founding Director and President, Fund II Foundation
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Beverly Hills Ballroom
Rethinking Risk Market participants are rethinking how they measure and manage risk. Post-crisis banking regulations have had unintended consequences, such as reduced liquidity, as banks move away from their traditional role as market-maker. Given the size of the Fed's balance sheet, new tools will be needed to unwind. With the growing proportion of sovereign debt in negative territory, liability-driven investors are finding it harder to meet future liabilities, and asset managers are moving away from benchmarking to absolute-return strategies. These changes have created additional market distortions and risks. In light of this, what steps are asset managers and banks taking to protect themselves from future shocks? How accurately do valuations adjust for negative interest rates? Are mark-to-market valuations and collateral calls adding a new risk dimension? Can risk actually be reduced, or is it simply shifted? The experts on this panel will dive into the theory and practice of financial modeling and discuss why no model is perfect.
Moderator
Madelyn Antoncic, Executive Director, Principal Global Investors; Former Vice President and Treasurer, World Bank
Speakers
Jane Buchan, CEO, PAAMCO
Laird Landmann, Group Managing Director and Co-Director, Fixed Income, TCW
Vlad Portnoy, Managing Director and Head of Strategic Investments, Jefferies Investment Advisers
Myron Scholes, Nobel Laureate, 1997; Frank E. Buck Professor of Finance, Emeritus, Stanford Graduate School of Business
David M. Solomon, Co-Head, Investment Banking Division, Goldman Sachs
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Canon
As Europe struggles to recover from the longest recession in its history, the lack of solidarity among the 28 member states of the European Union is evident in their inability to formulate common solutions to the most pressing problems. Economic growth continues to be subpar in much of the EU, and unemployment remains high at 9.5 percent, despite the European Central Bank's unprecedented monetary efforts to pump up eurozone activity and the benefit of deeply depressed energy prices. Greece's collapse, instability in Ukraine, terrorism and now the wrenching refugee crisis all have weighed on European confidence. The biggest test may be ahead: On June 23, Britons will vote on "Brexit" -- a referendum on whether to stay in the EU. This session will explore the future of the union, with or without Britain, and what member states should do to boost political stability, economic growth and more opportunities for their 508 million inhabitants.
Moderator
Ross Westgate, CEO, Infinity Creative Media
Speakers
Peter Beyer, Member, German Bundestag
Jim Mellon, Entrepreneur and Investor; Chairman, Burnbrae
Howard Shore, Executive Chairman, Shore Capital Group
Roger Wicker, U.S. Senator, Mississippi
Paul Wolfowitz, Visiting Scholar, American Enterprise Institute; Former President, World Bank
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Oakhurst
China's slowdown has been a drag on global financial markets, and the yuan's devaluation has acted as a brake on foreign direct investment into the country. Yet Chinese investment in Europe and the United States continues to reach new highs. This private session will offer a rare opportunity to interact with leading finance professionals with firsthand experience in China as they discuss the outlook for China's inbound and outbound investment.
Moderator
Kevin Lu, Partner and Member, Global Executive Board, Partners Group
Speakers
Chan Heng Wing , Senior Adviser, Asia Center, Milken Institute
Song Hwee Chia, Head of the Investment Group, Co-Head, China, and Co-Head of the Credit Portfolio, Temasek International
Hua Jingdong , Vice President and Treasurer, International Finance Corp.
Neil Shen, Founding Managing Partner, Sequoia Capital China
Perry Wong, Managing Director, Research, Milken Institute
Yuan Tian , Managing Director and Head of Investment Department II, CIC Capital
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
International Ballroom
Does the turmoil in global markets signal widening fault lines in the world economy, or are markets out of sync with reality? The long list of concerns starts with renewed jitters about growth in China and the strength of its currency. Plunging prices for oil and other commodities have slowed the economies of export-dependent emerging nations and left Russia and Brazil in recession. Currency wars are underway in Asia, where developing nations have been hurt by the dip in Chinese growth. Advanced economies are troubled as well. The eurozone has performed better than most, but the risk of a downturn remains and the European Central Bank has pledged to expand asset purchases if necessary. The Bank of Japan has pushed interest rates into negative territory. The U.S. and UK both are still growing, but lower gasoline prices aren't stimulating consumption spending as they have in the past. Can business and consumer confidence be sustained in the face of market uncertainties? In what areas are companies making significant investments? What business trends are stimulating growth -- and have the potential to transform industries and economies? What role does technology play in driving economic growth?
Moderator
Henny Sender, Chief Correspondent, International Finance, Financial Times
Speakers
Pierre Beaudoin, Executive Chairman, Bombardier Inc.
Liang Xinjun , Vice Chairman and CEO, Fosun International
Kevin Turner, Chief Operating Officer, Microsoft
Mark Weinberger, Global Chairman and CEO, EY
Andrew Witty, CEO, GlaxoSmithKline
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
International Gallery
The Asia-Pacific region represents the world's fastest-growing consumer market and will account for two-thirds of the global middle class by 2030. Investors are increasingly looking to Southeast Asia, especially the 10-member Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), for new opportunities. As ASEAN begins to seek advantage as a single market, investors need to understand the complexities and nuances of navigating the diverse terrain. This private session offers investors an opportunity to interact with senior government and business leaders and discuss the intricacies of the region's economy.
Moderator
Dino Patti Djalal, Asia Fellow, Milken Institute; Founder, Foreign Policy Community of Indonesia
Speakers
Charon Wardini bin Mokhzani, Managing Director, Khazanah Research Institute; Executive Director, Khazanah Nasional Berhad
Laura Deal Lacey, Executive Director, Asia Center, Milken Institute
Kasemsit Pathomsak, Executive Chairman, Merchant Partners Ltd.
Shanti Poesposoetjipto, Chairman, PT Samudera Indonesia Tbk
Paul Wolfowitz, Visiting Scholar, American Enterprise Institute; Former President, World Bank
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Beverly Hills Ballroom
To multitudes around the world, organized sports are a way of life -- a common language that cuts across race, class and geography. The world of sports is also populated by multibillion-dollar businesses competing for market share as entertainment options proliferate. Being a successful league commissioner or team owner today requires looking beyond the bottom line and drawing on a unique set of skills. These stewards of the game must also manage exceptionally talented athletes (and their exceptionally talented agents). They have to satisfy legions of dedicated fans who have strong opinions about every contract and rule change. And they have to preserve the rich legacies of their sports while making sure they remain poised to capture the enthusiasm of future fans. Institute Chairman Mike Milken sits down with leaders from across the sporting world for a wide-ranging discussion about the industry, the evolving relationship of fans and clubs, shifting revenue models and -- more generally -- the future of sports.
Moderator
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Speakers
Wesley Edens, Founder and Co-Chairman of Fortress Investment Group; Co-Owner, Milwaukee Bucks
Brian France, Chairman and CEO, NASCAR
Bobby Kotick, CEO, Activision Blizzard
Robert Kraft, Founder, Chairman and CEO, the Kraft Group; Owner, New England Patriots
David Stern, Commissioner Emeritus, National Basketball Association
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Dayton
Are economic growth and productivity being under-reported? Technology, long the driver of economic and social progress, has perhaps outstripped our current methods of measuring economic growth and productivity. Technological advancement has unlocked human productivity in new and surprising ways in the last decade and put information in the hands of those who never before had access to it. This session will look at how technology is affecting markets, industries and the global economy.
Moderator
Jim McCaughan, CEO, Principal Global Investors; President, Global Asset Management, Principal Financial Group
Speakers
Guruduth Banavar, Vice President and Chief Science Officer, Cognitive Computing, IBM
Juan Enriquez, Managing Director, Excel Venture Management
Martin Ford, Author; Entrepreneur
Peng T. Ong, Managing Director, Monk's Hill Ventures; Chairman, Investment Committee, Singapore University of Technology and Design Endowment Fund
Sherry Turkle, Author; Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Wilshire Ballroom
With almost $3 trillion in assets -- and the freedom to invest opportunistically worldwide -- hedge funds have become one of the most important market-moving forces of the last few decades. This panel brings together leading founders of hedge funds and asset managers for a conversation about the evolution of the industry. Some of the questions that will be addressed: With more hedge funds than ever before, how can a manager generate meaningful returns? Are fee structures likely to change significantly with increasing pressure from institutional clients? In this highly personality-driven business, how does the role of a founder change as a fund grows -- and can a fund succeed the person who created it?
Moderator
Ilana D. Weinstein, Founder and CEO, The IDW Group LLC
Speakers
Cliff Asness, Co-Founder, Managing Principal and Chief Investment Officer, AQR Capital Management
Neil Chriss, Founder and Chief Investment Officer, Hutchin Hill Capital
Steven Cohen, Chairman and CEO, Point72 Asset Management; Co-Chair and Co-Founder, Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Poolside - East
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Executive Center
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Poolside - West
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Stardust
We invite you to join a special reception with our top supporters and speakers to celebrate the Milken Institute's growing international initiatives and community. This event will bring together international officials to launch the IFC-Milken Institute Capital Markets Training Program which will be hosted at The George Washington University starting this Fall. The Program's inaugural class is on its way to joining the next generation of capital-market leaders in developing and emerging economies.
6:30 pm - 9:00 pm
Paley Center
7:00 pm - 8:45 pm
International Ballroom
This session begins with dinner from 7 to 8 p.m., followed by an engaging conversation with two Hollywood luminaries: Brian Grazer and Tom Hanks. These Academy Award winners let us listen in as they share movie clips, anecdotes and insights from their decades-long careers and friendship.
Speakers
Brian Grazer, Film and Television Producer
Tom Hanks, Actor and Producer
9:00 pm - 10:30 pm
Beverly Hills Ballroom
Join us for a fun, relaxing evening of entertainment and music with David Foster and friends.
Performers
David Foster, Producer and Songwriter; Chairman, Verve Music Group
Maria Aleida Rodriguez, Soprano
Tuesday, May 3, 2016
6:00 am - 8:30 am
Beverly Hills Ballroom Foyer
8:00 am - 9:15 am
Pavilion
Women have long outnumbered men in U.S. college enrollment. Yet they are still woefully underrepresented in both entrepreneurship and in the corporate ranks. Although the number of businesses launched by women is on the rise, research shows that access to funding continues to lag for female-led ventures. And in the corporate realm, despite the efforts of organizations to develop cultures that are inclusive and supportive of women's advancement, too few females have reached the highest ranks of management. Clearly, women have both the desire and the qualifications to rise to the top, so what are the biggest hurdles standing in their way? Are there systemic barriers hampering women's advancement? And how do women of distinct generations (millennial, Gen X, baby boomers) see both the opportunities and the challenges?
Moderator
Richard Ditizio, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Milken Institute
Speakers
Christopher Ailman, Chief Investment Officer, California State Teachers’ Retirement System; Co-Chair, Global Capital Markets Advisory Council, Milken Institute
Alexandra Cavoulacos, Founder, Chief Operating Officer and Head of Product, the Muse
Lauren Leader-Chivée, Co-Founder and CEO, All in Together
Rosie Rios, Treasurer of the United States
Janet Thomas, Founder and CEO, TouchFX; President, Women in Banking and Finance
Candida Wolff, Executive Vice President, Global Government Affairs, Citi
8:00 am - 9:15 am
Board Room
The challenge of containing the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa highlighted the need for increased collaboration and scaled-up investment in global health. In this private session, global health experts, investors and government officials will explore the link between economic prosperity and global health. Participants will discuss potential new financing models, avenues for collaboration and best practices in making the business case for private-sector investment.
8:00 am - 9:15 am
Oakhurst
Now that China's economic growth has slowed to its lowest level in 25 years, investors are looking to India--expected to overtake China in GDP growth this year at 7.3 percent--as the next powerhouse. A number of factors are driving India's attractiveness: monetary policy discipline, macroeconomic stability, a young population and a pro-reform government. Opportunity abounds, but questions arise about the main action points for businesses looking to leverage their presence there. And how should investors manage the volatility that comes with a fast-growing country like India? This private discussion will address the investment opportunities offered by India's rising economy and its strongest sectors such as tech and manufacturing--as well as how to manage the risks.
Moderator
Komal Sri-Kumar, Senior Fellow, Milken Institute; President, Sri-Kumar Global Strategies, Inc.
Speakers
Reuben Abraham, Asia Fellow, Milken Institute; CEO and Senior Fellow, IDFC Institute
Robert Petty, Managing Partner and Co-Founder, Clearwater Capital Partners
Abhishek Sinha, Co-Founder and CEO, Eko India Financial Services
8:00 am - 9:15 am
International Terrace
The U.S. spends roughly 90 cents of every health dollar on treating disease and only a dime on prevention and research--and yet many of the most prevalent diseases are clearly preventable. According to the World Bank, three of the top five social burdens (those which have the greatest direct economic impact) are smoking, obesity and alcoholism. In the 20th and early 21st centuries, public health initiatives have extended lives and boosted prosperity around the world through immunizations, hygiene, reduced tobacco use and control of infectious diseases. Deaths from heart disease, lung cancer and stroke also have declined. How can we duplicate the successes of the past? In this session, a panel of health experts and industry leaders will discuss the top public health challenges and possible solutions. Where might the solutions come from? Who are the new players, and what new tools and approaches can they offer?
Moderator
Ryan Shadrick Wilson, Chief Strategy Officer and General Counsel, Partnership for a Healthier America
Speakers
Lynn Goldman, Michael and Lori Milken Dean, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University
Harry Leider, Chief Medical Officer and Group Vice President, Walgreens
Carmen Nevarez, Vice President, External Relations, and Preventive Medicine Advisor, Public Health Institute
Winston Wong, Medical Director for Community Benefit, Kaiser Permanente
8:00 am - 9:15 am
Beverly Hills Ballroom
U.S. real estate has generated some of the best investment returns of any asset class over the last five years, as both residential and commercial property values have rebounded amid low interest rates and falling vacancy rates. But with the Federal Reserve seemingly intent on tightening credit, and affordability a growing issue in many residential markets, real estate investors face a changing U.S. landscape. At the same time, some foreign property markets may hold more allure -- but also more risks, including geopolitical concerns. It's a critical time for real estate investors to size up U.S. opportunities against foreign opportunities, weighing considerations such as relative property values, financing options and demographic trends. Which regions and countries offer the most potential now? What are the trends by sector (retail, industrial, commercial, hotel, multifamily, single-family)? Is real estate equity or debt the better investment? And will U.S. real estate, especially in California, continue to benefit from foreign capital fleeing some countries, including China?
Moderator
Maria Bartiromo, Anchor and Global Markets Editor, Fox Business Network
Speakers
Barry Blattman, Vice Chairman and Senior Managing Partner, Brookfield Asset Management
Victor Coleman, Chairman and CEO, Hudson Pacific Properties
David Simon, Chairman and CEO, Simon Property Group
Michael Weil, CEO, AR Global
8:00 am - 9:15 am
International Ballroom
Capital flows, and the opportunities and risks they create, can sometimes explain a great deal about boom-and-bust cycles. The massive capital flows out of emerging markets last year illustrate the quick reversal of fortunes that nations can experience as a result of capital flight. At the same time, sweeping changes in global markets are changing the very nature of these flows. Passive strategies such as index funds have swelled in recent years. The rise of mega-managers, responsible for trillions of dollars in assets, can also increase or reduce liquidity. The experts on this panel will discuss capital flows, asset management, liquidity and the current conditions transforming the international monetary system. They'll seek to answer: What are the consequences of recent dramatic changes to the nature of international capital flows? What are the effects, opportunities and risks from the decline of active strategies, and how has the shift from propriety trading from banks to asset management firms influenced capital allocation?
Moderator
Tracy Alloway, Executive Editor, Bloomberg Markets
Speakers
David Hunt, President and CEO, PGIM, the Global Investment Management Businesses of Prudential Financial, Inc.
Jim McCaughan, CEO, Principal Global Investors; President, Global Asset Management, Principal Financial Group
Hilda Ochoa-Brillembourg, Founder and Chairman, Strategic Investment Group
Ronald O'Hanley, President and CEO, State Street Global Advisors
Nouriel Roubini, Chairman, Roubini Global Economics; Professor of Economics, Stern School of Business, New York University
8:00 am - 9:15 am
Wilshire Ballroom
This year began with optimism that the U.S. economy could pull the rest of the world up, but the focus soon shifted to whether the rest of the world would pull the U.S. down. The domestic economy's resilience entering 2016 was quickly countered by deepening pessimism over China's slowing growth, a broad plunge in global stock markets and a further collapse of oil prices. In Europe and Japan, the spread of negative yields on government bonds has resurrected fears of deflation taking hold. Yet the U.S. economy has continued to show key signs of strength, including solid job growth, healthy car sales and robust construction spending. This panel will examine whether the economic rebound remains on sure footing, considering not just the external threats but also domestic challenges such as the corporate profits recession and the prospect of higher interest rates. Could weak profits hamper job gains and capital spending? Will the benefit to U.S. consumers from the oil price crash far outweigh the hit to the Oil Patch? And could uncertainty over the election become a drag on growth in 2016?
Moderator
Ross DeVol, Chief Research Officer, Milken Institute
Speakers
Monty Bennett, Founder, Chairman and CEO, Ashford Group of Companies
Juan Enriquez, Managing Director, Excel Venture Management
Fred Hochberg, Chairman and President, Export-Import Bank of the U.S.
Judith McKenna, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Walmart U.S.
Bluford Putnam, Chief Economist and Managing Director, Strategic Intelligence and Analytics, CME Group
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Maple
By 2020, the workplace will look very different from the one we see today. Companies will function in a vastly more digitized environment, but 30 percent of them will fail because there aren't enough workers with the skills to drive the digital transformation that companies need. Analysts are forecasting a global shortage of 38 million to 40 million college-educated workers, a gap that will affect advanced nations as well as emerging countries. And the length of tenure in a job is shortening as well. The average time a worker spends in one job has declined from five to seven years to only two to three years, widening the gap between supply and demand. This session will explore the critical changes that must be made to give workers the skills required in the workforce of tomorrow.
Moderator
Gregory Cappelli, Director and CEO, Apollo Education Group, Inc.; Chairman, Apollo Global, Inc.
Speakers
Jared Bernstein, Economic Policy Fellow, Milken Institute; Senior Fellow, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities; Former Chief Economist to Vice President Joe Biden
David Burstein, CEO and Co-Founder, Run for America; Author, "Fast Future: How the Millennial Generation Is Shaping Our World"
Edith Cooper, Executive Vice President and Global Head of Human Capital Management, Goldman Sachs
John Donovan, Chief Strategy Officer and Group President, AT&T Technology and Operations
Seth Harris, Counsel, Dentons; Former U.S. Deputy Secretary of Labor
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Beverly Hills Ballroom
Overcoming the lethargy of the status quo is an ongoing challenge for most businesses. In today's fast-paced environment, innovation can mean the difference between robust success and abject failure. How do today's most effective leaders encourage outside-the-box thinking and measured risk-taking, while also safeguarding stability and mitigating recklessness? This session will explore the ways in which innovation can be hard-wired into a culture in order to produce the highest levels of employee engagement and bottom-line success. Game-changing, innovative ideas can come from the unlikeliest of places, but only in environments that embrace and encourage diverse thinking. How does your organization measure up?
Moderator
Willow Bay, Director and Professor, USC Annenberg School of Journalism
Speakers
Robert Kegan, Meehan Professor of Adult Learning and Professional Development, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Scott Neal, Senior Vice President, Worldwide Sales and Marketing, Gulfstream
Susan Santiago, Senior Vice President, Americas Operational Experiences, Hyatt Hotels Corp.
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Pavilion
Parag Khanna sees a new world order, one focused not on territory but connectivity: the roads, pipelines and Internet cables that are the most valuable currency of the future. In this session, Khanna, a leading global strategist and bestselling author, will discuss the themes of his new book, "Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization," and present some of its custom-made maps. Connectivity, Khanna says, is destiny, and the most connected people and nations will also be the most successful. It's a race that China is winning with its massive investment in infrastructure uniting Asia and Europe. However, Khanna also argues that the United States can do much more with its financial and technological tools to remain a connected superpower. Furthermore, connectivity offers great hope for humankind, eliminating the need for resource wars and bringing new dynamism and hope to Africa and the Middle East. Join us for this fascinating discussion with Khanna, who will sign copies of his book after the event.
Moderator
Richard Sandler, Executive Vice President, Milken Family Foundation; Partner, Law Offices of Maron & Sandler
Speaker
Parag Khanna, Contributor, CNN Global; Author, "Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization"
9:30 am - 10:30 am
International Ballroom
Free-market capitalism has been the dominant economic system in the West for hundreds of years. It has facilitated spectacular improvements in living standards, doubled lifespans and lifted generations of workers from backbreaking labor to comfortable middle-class lives. But, as instability and increasing inequality batter the global economy, critics wonder whether the system can sustain prosperity without more aggressive intervention. Few people want to kill the golden goose. But with markets concentrating wealth and power in fewer hands and global economic leadership increasingly fragmented, the idea that capitalism will repair itself seems problematic. Do we need to restructure the entire system or just smooth its rough edges? Is change even possible without the leadership of wealthy elites and the kind of cooperation among sovereign states rarely seen outside of war? Big questions to resolve in an hour, but this distinguished panel is uniquely qualified to try.
Moderator
Peter Passell, Senior Fellow, Milken Institute; Editor, the Milken Institute Review
Speakers
Tyler Cowen, Professor of Economics, George Mason University
Diana Farrell, President and CEO, JPMorgan Chase Institute
Alan Krueger, Bendheim Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Princeton University; Former Chairman, White House Council of Economic Advisers
John Taylor, Mary and Robert Raymond Professor of Economics, Stanford University; George P. Schultz Senior Fellow in Economics, Hoover Institution
9:30 am - 10:30 am
International Terrace
The post-financial crisis regulatory and monetary policy environment brought balance-sheet discipline to the banking sector, but banks have become more reluctant to engage in market-making and direct lending for middle-market companies. At the same time, factors such as volatility, disappointing hedge-fund returns and political uncertainty has pension funds, insurance companies and others pouring billions of dollars into direct lending and other credit vehicles. How are these forces affecting mid-market firms? Which entities are best positioned to fill the gap? Does the popularity of direct lending mark a permanent shift to non-bank lenders? If so, is this enough to finance their growth and create jobs?
Moderator
Staci Warden, Executive Director, Center for Financial Markets, Milken Institute
Speakers
Michael Arougheti, Co-Founder, Ares; Director and President, Ares Management GP LLC
André Bourbonnais, President and CEO, PSP Investments
Bilal Rashid, Chairman and CEO, OFS Capital Corp.
Brian Reynolds, Founder and Managing Partner, Chatham Capital
Steven Sugarman, Chairman, President and CEO, Banc of California
9:30 am - 10:30 am
International Gallery
Last year was a volatile one for institutional and individual investors alike, and hedge funds were not immune from the downturn. But even in tough conditions, there are ways to generate alpha. In this private session, some of the best minds in the hedge fund business will share their investment ideas and market views for 2016.
Moderator
Simon Smiles, Chief Investment Officer, Ultra High Net Worth, UBS Wealth Management
Speakers
Kyle Bass, Chief Investment Officer, Hayman Capital Management
Joshua Friedman, Co-Founder, Co-Chairman and Co-CEO, Canyon Partners, LLC
Michael Hintze, Founder, CEO and Senior Investment Officer, CQS
Jason Karp, Chief investment Officer and CEO, Tourbillon Capital Partners LP
Igor Tulchinsky, Founder and CEO, WorldQuant LLC
David Warren, CEO, Chief Investment Officer and Founding Partner, DW Partners LP
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Palm
Simultaneous disruptions are underway in venture capital investing. New Web-based platforms provide startup companies with alternatives to traditional venture funding. And at least some of the entrepreneurs behind the platforms bring new philosophies to investing as well. They want their investments to serve a purpose as well as generate a profit--applying their financial acumen to advance innovations in clean energy, medical technology and education. And they frequently seek out opportunities in underserved communities. In this session, a panel of successful, tech-focused investors will discuss these trends, their business models and venture capital's potential to help solve some of the world's biggest challenges.
Moderator
Court Coursey, Managing Partner, TomorrowVentures, LLC
Speakers
Chance Barnett, CEO, Crowdfunder
Troy Carter, Founder and CEO, Atom Factory; Founding and General Partner, Cross Culture VC
Dave McClure, Founding Partner, 500 Startups
Kara Nortman, Partner, Upfront Ventures; Chairman, Seedling
D.A. Wallach, Partner, Inevitable Ventures; Recording Artist
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Stardust
Despite progress toward making women and men equal partners in the workforce, the gap separating them in terms of pay and advancement remains significant. Gender disparity is a worldwide issue that costs the global economy and individual companies alike. Achieving equal opportunity for women could add $12 trillion to global GDP by 2025, according to research by McKinsey & Co. In this private session, McKinsey researchers will discuss what they found as well as strategies and best practices for moving the needle. There will be time for an interactive discussion, so bring your questions too.
Speakers
Alexis Krivkovich, Partner, McKinsey & Co.
Celia Pohani Huber, Senior Partner, McKinsey & Co.
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Canon
Optimism about Japan's economic rebound is dimming under the cloud of a contracting GDP, subzero interest rates and weak consumer spending. The setbacks threaten to undermine the unprecedented monetary and economic policies of "Abenomics," a formula combining quantitative easing, fiscal stimulus and structural reforms designed to spur growth in the world's third-largest economy. On the positive side, corporate profits are up and record-low unemployment may yet lead to higher levels of consumer activity. What weapons remain in Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's economic arsenal? Will the Bank of Japan step up monetary easing? Our panel of experts will examine the latest developments and offer their insights about what Japan will do to get back on the path to growth and the ramifications for the Asia-Pacific region.
Moderator
Kotaro Tamura, Asia Fellow, Milken Institute; Chairman, Japan Intelligence Initiative; Former Senator and Parliamentary Secretary for Economic and Fiscal Policy, Japan
Speakers
William Haseltine, Chairman and President, Access Health International
Daisuke Iwase, President and Chief Operating Officer, Lifenet Insurance Co.
Hideaki Ohmura, Governor of Aichi Prefecture, Japan
Scott Sato, President and Chief Operating Officer, Pasona Inc.
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Wilshire Ballroom
The world's central banks have borne most of the burden of pulling the global economy out of the Great Recession. But that has forced them into uncharted waters on policy and caused what critics say is gross mispricing in financial markets. The Federal Reserve was first with quantitative easing -- essentially buying up massive amounts of bonds -- and Europe and Japan have followed. One result is unprecedented negative yields on European and Japanese government bonds. At the same time, policymakers' decisions in many countries to allow their currencies to devalue, an attempt to boost exports, made the dollar the foreign-exchange strongman in 2014 and 2015 -- which slammed U.S. corporate earnings. The Fed, meanwhile, began to tighten credit last year but has already backed off from its initial rate-hike schedule amid fresh fears that anemic global economic growth was slowing further. The critical question now is whether central banks have run out of tricks to fend off deflation. Our esteemed panel will assess where monetary policy has left the world economy, and what's next.
Moderator
David Zervos, Chief Market Strategist, Jefferies LLC; Chief Investment Officer, Global Macro Division, Jefferies Investment Advisers
Speakers
Joachim Fels, Managing Director and Global Economic Advisor, Pimco
Pippa Malmgren, Founder, DRPM Group; Advisor, British Ministry of Defense
James McCormack, Managing Director and Global Head of Sovereign and Supranational Ratings, Fitch
Stephen S. Poloz, Governor, Bank of Canada
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Brighton
What happens when you mix next-generation energy and ingenuity with philanthropic capital? The answer is you get innovations that bring a business sense--and greater impact--to charitable giving. As more and more millennials think about their entry point into philanthropy, they want to do more than simply write a check. What are the key motivations driving young philanthropists and what challenges do they face as they move beyond the previous generation's idea of giving? Panelists will discuss their approach to philanthropic giving, their successes and failures, and how they measure their long-term impact.
Moderator
Melissa Stevens, Executive Director, Center for Strategic Philanthropy, Milken Institute
Speakers
Matt Dalio, CEO and Chief of Product, Endless
Leili Gerami, Chairman, LEGE Investments; Partner, Maven Pictures
Justin Rockefeller, Global Director, Family Offices and Foundations, Addepar; Co-Founder, the ImPact
Cameron Saul, Co-Founder, Bottletop
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Dayton
Although it took many years -- and much arm-twisting and compromise -- completing the historic Paris climate change agreement may have been the easy part. Now comes the real test: making it work. How that will be done, by whom and how quickly, is unclear. The task the 196 signatory nations set for themselves is enormous. And the burden isn't on governments alone. Individuals, investors and businesses -- the energy industry in particular -- must accept responsibility. Will the Paris accord be a game changer -- a strong signal to industry that it must adopt more sustainable practices and make larger investments in carbon-reducing technologies? Or will the absence of enforcement provisions prevent urgent, meaningful action? It's time to ask: What's next?
Moderator
Aimée Christensen, CEO, Christensen Global Strategies; Executive Director, Sun Valley Institute for Resilience
Speakers
Richard Friend, Cavendish Professor and Director, Winton Programme for the Physics of Sustainability, University of Cambridge
Hua Jingdong , Vice President and Treasurer, International Finance Corp.
Fred Krupp, President, Environmental Defense Fund
Franklin Orr, Under Secretary for Science and Energy, U.S. Department of Energy
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Whittier Room
Traditional dreams of retirement -- a life of leisure and a home in the desert -- are rapidly changing as a growing majority of older adults seeks lifelong work, learning, challenge and contribution. The changing culture of aging is generating exciting possibilities for individuals and opportunities for businesses and investors in the massive, growing and global longevity economy. A new era of volunteerism, philanthropy and purposeful engagement is evolving. The emerging cohort of older adults is painting a very different picture of retirement than the tired visions of an earlier generation. How will the redefinition of retirement change our lives, communities and institutions? Every one of us and our families will be affected. Join these thought leaders for a stimulating conversation about your own future.
Moderator
Ina Jaffe, Correspondent, NPR
Speakers
Ken Dychtwald, President and CEO, Age Wave
Paul Irving, Chairman, Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging; Distinguished Scholar in Residence, Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California
Andrew Sieg, Managing Director and Head of Global Wealth & Retirement Solutions, Bank of America Merrill Lynch
Jacqueline (Jackie) Wong, CEO, Temasek Trust; Executive Director and CEO, Temasek Management Services
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Pavilion
A new generation of donors is changing philanthropy. Accustomed to solving problems and driving change, they aren't waiting for retirement to begin sharing vast portions of their fortunes to meet worthy goals. They have pledged to spend down during their lifetimes and use many different vehicles to deploy philanthropic funds. These givers -- a group that includes many tech titans -- flex not only their wallets, but their influence and acumen. In doing so, they are pioneering new, activist giving models to turn their personal wealth into society's risk capital. Listen to leading donors discuss how they are guiding their philanthropy in innovative ways.
Moderator
Richard Ditizio, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Milken Institute
Speakers
Precious Moloi-Motsepe, Founder and Executive Chairperson, African Fashion International; Co-Founder and Vice Chairperson, Motsepe Foundation
Sean Parker, Chairman, Parker Foundation
Lynda Resnick, Vice Chair and Co-Owner, The Wonderful Co.
George Weiss, Founder, Weiss Family Foundation
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Canon
Rich in population and promise, Africa is an untapped market for many global businesses. This panel will bring together executives from both multinational companies and African firms to discuss their strategies for scaling up business on the continent and their perspectives on Africa's current and future role in the global marketplace. How does Africa's geographic and cultural diversity inform business practices? Are multinationals successfully adapting their global processes to local markets? Do domestic firms have a competitive edge with the continent's consumers? And what will it take for domestic players to grow to be regional and international competitors? This session also will consider the greatest obstacles to African economic growth, as well as the business niches most ripe for foreign investment.
Moderator
Helima Croft, Managing Director, Global Head of Commodity Strategy, RBC Capital Markets
Speakers
Samit Gehlot, Managing Director, KG Group
Bassim Haidar, Co-Founder and CEO, GMT Group; Chairman and CEO, Channel IT Group
Yvonne Ike, Managing Director and Head of Sub-Saharan Africa, Bank of America Merrill Lynch
Jay Ireland, President and CEO, GE Africa
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Wilshire Ballroom
Is China's economy in trouble or merely transforming into a more mature, consumer-driven phase of development? Volatility in China's stock market and reduced demand for imported commodities have had global repercussions. Our panel of experts will examine China's plan to achieve moderate growth and raise domestic consumption through a combination of monetary and fiscal policies. Will the "One Belt, One Road" initiative be able to cushion the deepening slowdown? How will China build confidence in its financial markets while maneuvering the transformation? Will President Xi Jinping's tough stance on corruption have any impact on economic reform?
Moderator
Timothy Dattels, Co-Managing Partner, TPG Capital
Speakers
James Fong, CEO, Oriental DreamWorks
Stephen Roach, Senior Fellow, Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, Yale University
Neil Shen, Founding Managing Partner, Sequoia Capital China
Jing Ulrich, Managing Director and Vice Chairman, Asia-Pacific, JPMorgan Chase
Xiao Yuqiang , Chairman, U.S. Management Committee, Industrial and Commercial Bank of China
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Maple
If we are to achieve the goal of limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) and avoid the worst effects of climate change, the world must invest an additional $44 trillion in clean energy, or more than $1 trillion a year for the next 36 years, according to the International Energy Agency. Governments and private investors are beginning to pay attention. Last year, a record $329 billion was invested in clean energy projects such as solar arrays and wind turbine farms. During climate change meetings in Paris in December, 20 governments pledged to increase spending for clean energy research, and 28 of the world's wealthiest philanthropists and entrepreneurs, including Mark Zuckerberg and Bill Gates, pledged their own money to develop new technologies. Which are the most promising, and which are being brought to scale? How are low oil and gas prices influencing these projects? What are the short- and long-term returns in renewable energy?
Moderator
Greg Dalton, Founder and Host, Climate One
Speakers
Andrew Chung, Founder and Managing Partner, 1955 Capital
Lynn Jurich, CEO and Co-Founder, Sunrun
Andy Karsner, Managing Partner, Emerson Collective
John Woolard, Vice President, Energy, Google
10:45 am - 11:45 am
International Terrace
The global swoon in stocks this year, and the multiyear plunge in commodity prices, have unnerved many investors. But this should be an exciting time for value-focused investors who excel at identifying bargains in times of economic and market turmoil--and have the conviction to buy when everyone else is selling. A key question, however, is how to avoid "value traps": assets that look cheap by many measures but turn out to have a lot further to go before bottoming. That was the story with oil, which fell for much of 2014 and 2015 despite analysts' repeated predictions of stabilization or reversal. This session will explore how investors can distinguish an asset's market price from its intrinsic value. What are some of the most attractive opportunities today among equities, bonds and real assets? Is the U.S. corporate profit recession altering investors' views of fair prices for equities? What new paradigms in asset pricing emerged out of the financial crisis? Against the backdrop of anemic growth, how do investors discover a true bargain?
Moderator
Gregory Zuckerman, Special Writer, Wall Street Journal; Author, "The Frackers"
Speakers
Glenn August, Founder and CEO, Oak Hill Advisors
John Calamos Sr., Founder, Chairman and Global Chief Investment Officer, Calamos Investments
Matthew James, Chief Strategist and Head of Research, CQS
Matthew Natcharian, Head of Structured Credit, Babson Capital Management
Anne Walsh, Senior Managing Director and Assistant Chief Investment Officer, Fixed Income, Guggenheim Partners
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Beverly Hills Ballroom
He has been called one of the greatest athletes in the history of the National Basketball Association, and is arguably the most talented player of his generation. Kobe Bryant's impressive record speaks for itself: five NBA championships; 18-time All-Star; ranked third in career NBA scoring; second-highest single-game point total (81 against Toronto) in NBA history; and winner of two Olympic gold medals. After 20 years in professional basketball--all with the Los Angeles Lakers--Bryant announced he would retire this season. In this session, one of his first post-retirement appearances, Bryant talks with sports broadcaster Jim Gray about his career, his life and his future. It promises to be a fascinating look at the amazing career of a one-of-a-kind athlete who has left an indelible mark on basketball and sports.
Moderator
Jim Gray, Sportscaster, Showtime, Fox and WestwoodOne Radio
Speaker
Kobe Bryant, NBA Champion; CEO, Kobe Inc.
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Stardust
This private working session will bring together institutional investors and government and industry leaders to explore ways in which the private sector can deploy capital to address sustainable development around the globe. What does sustainable development look like and what will it mean for governments, industry and individuals? How are the right financing vehicles created to effectively and efficiently channel private and public capital to new projects? The session will include case studies of regions and industries, and participants will discuss best practices and ways to implement new models, from development banks to SME funds to secondary market tools.
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Oakhurst
Mexico's diverse, growing economy is giving it greater visibility on the world stage. Growth in manufacturing and stronger ties to the global marketplace have energized Mexico, providing compelling reasons for investors, exporters and financiers to explore the opportunities and challenges Mexico presents. This private session will feature leading figures from the government and private sector who will discuss the dynamics of the economy next door.
Speakers
Vicente Fox, Former President, Mexico
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Brighton
Polls play an essential role in our democracy, but in recent high-profile elections, polls failed to accurately predict results. Races that were reported to be dead heats turned out to be far from it. Huge leads evaporated into dramatic upsets. Despite rapid technological advances, most pollsters still rely on phone surveys to sample public opinion, even though fewer and fewer people agree to participate. Will online surveys, which potentially can tap a more willing pool of participants, provide the answer? Will the use of new technologies -- which enable pollsters to reach mobile users -- lead to more accurate phone surveys? And will the use of more powerful, sophisticated algorithms compensate for declining response rates? The most pressing question, as the 2016 elections draw near, is how much faith we should put in polls. If people decide whether to vote based on pollsters' forecasts, is polling a danger to participation in democracy? How can we remove inherent biases in survey results to develop sound policy?
Moderator
Mollyann Brodie, Senior Vice President, Public Opinion and Survey Research, Kaiser Family Foundation; President, American Association of Public Opinion Research
Speakers
Jon Cohen, Chief Research Officer, SurveyMonkey
Michael Dimock, President, Pew Research Center
Alex Lundry, Co-Founder and Chief Data Scientist, Deep Root Analytics
Margie Omero, Executive Vice President, Public Affairs, PSB Research; Co-Host, "The Pollsters"
10:45 am - 11:45 am
International Gallery
Divided internally and fighting for survival, the European Union faces a year of uncertainty as multifaceted challenges lie unaddressed. Britain and Greece are on the verge of leaving the EU, with unknown political and economic consequences. The relentless influx of refugees and migrants continues with no sign of slowing. Strong voices declare the mass migration to be inextricably linked to terrorism and extremism. This turbulence, coupled with a deteriorating relationship with Russia, has politicians and policymakers scrambling for solutions to address concerns around the integrity of the continent's borders. In this private session, participants will discuss what's next for Europe, what steps can be taken to put the EU back on track, and what needs to be done in order for the region to become globally competitive once again.
Moderator
Peter Warren, Portfolio Manager of Diversified Strategies and Member of Executive Committee, CQS
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Whittier Room
Buyers spent nearly $4 trillion on mergers and acquisitions in 2015, a record that earned it the title the Year of Megamergers. In 2016, potential dealmakers view the market with less certainty. But with the cost of capital still low -- and little prospect of a sharp increase -- the stage may be set for another busy period. Most of last year's transactions, led by Pfizer's $160 billion combination with Allergan, were driven by large corporations looking to increase revenue or reduce costs. Which sectors hold the best opportunities in 2016? What form will the next big buyouts take -- and what will be the most important factors in getting them done? Are divestitures primed to rise as companies shed assets to meet their capital needs, and will we see that as a major theme for deal-making through 2017? Our panel of bankers and advisors will examine today's M&A market with a focus on where the deal-making is likely to be hottest.
Moderator
Jason Kelly, New York Bureau Chief, Bloomberg
Speakers
John Danhakl, Managing Partner, Leonard Green & Partners, LP
Steve Krouskos, Global Vice Chair-Elect, Transaction Advisory Services, EY
Jennifer Nason, Global Chairman, Technology, Media and Telecommunications Investment Banking, J.P. Morgan
Robin Rankin, Managing Director and Co-Head, Global Mergers and Acquisitions, Credit Suisse
Paul Stefanick, Head, Corporate and Investment Banking Americas, Deutsche Bank
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Dayton
The tech titans of Silicon Valley are joining the search for cures. Leading companies such as Google, Apple and Intel are helping refine methods for collecting and analyzing of vast amounts of medical data to assist medical researchers. As the industry devotes its best minds to creating better tools for research, young philanthropists from the tech world are asserting their influence and bringing tech industry ideas and approaches to accelerate medical progress. Could this be a disruptive force in medical research, helping shrink the time and cost of bringing treatments to patients? Can we make Moore's Law work in the search for cures?
Moderator
Lindy Fishburne, Founder, Breakout Labs, Thiel Foundation; Managing Partner, Breakout Ventures
Speakers
Linda Avey, Co-Founder, Curious, Inc.; Co-Founder, 23andMe
Noah Craft, Co-Founder and CEO, Science 37
Lloyd Minor, Dean, Stanford University School of Medicine
Asha Nayak, Chief Medical Officer, Intel Corp.
Lisa Suennen, Managing Member, Cardeation Capital; Managing Partner, Venture Valkyrie Consulting
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Palm
How do you replicate the Bay Area's Silicon Valley or North Carolina's Research Triangle? If a precise formula existed, it would be the modern-day equivalent of alchemy. But there's no mystery about the foundation on which such hotbeds of innovation rest: America's research universities. With state and federal support constrained or falling, universities are aggressively expanding their role in regional economic development. They've become launch pads for commercializing research, spinning out innovative firms and developing industry clusters that generate jobs and attract talented workforces. This panel will spotlight innovative models of collaboration with the private and government sectors that are spurring regional economic growth, and look at how universities are walking the tightrope of balancing a commitment to basic scientific research -- where new knowledge is generated -- with their desire and need to maximize returns from transferring technology to the private sector.
Moderator
Ross DeVol, Chief Research Officer, Milken Institute
Speakers
Ronald Daniels, President, Johns Hopkins University
Fred Farina, Chief Innovation and Corporate Partnerships Officer, Caltech
Bahija Jallal, Executive Vice President and Head of MedImmune, AstraZeneca
Deval Patrick, Managing Director, Bain Capital; Former Governor, Massachusetts
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Stardust
This annual GCMAC meeting brings together senior leaders of large global asset-owner funds to discuss the issues driving investment decisions. With the participation of Milken Institute Chairman Michael Milken, the council's off-the-record discussion will offer valuable insight into current conditions in major markets and sectors. This year's conversation, moderated by GCMAC Co-Chair and CalSTRS Chief Investment Officer Christopher Ailman, will range widely, touching on asset allocation, the changing strategies of asset owners, opportunities developing around the world and more.
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm
International Ballroom
Ever since its lightning advance across Syria and Iraq two years ago, the world has become all too familiar with the jihadist militant group ISIS. Their grisly beheadings and destruction of ancient sites gained them not only international condemnation, but, unfortunately, many followers. While at first ISIS may have been seen as a "local" problem, the recent terrorist attacks it inspired in Brussels, Paris, Egypt, Jakarta, Africa, Istanbul and the U.S. have made it the top concern of many world leaders. Though increased military intervention by the U.S., Iraq, France, Russia and others have slowed ISIS' advance, the group remains a potent terrorist threat. But they aren't the only one. Al Qaeda remains strong in parts of the globe, Boko Haram in Africa, the Taliban in Asia. Homegrown terrorists who aren't formally affiliated with a group, but sympathize with a cause, also pose a serious threat. The question is: how can ISIS and other terrorists be defeated? Without more "boots on the ground," who will force their hand? What are the best strategies to win this war?
Moderator
Michael Weiss, Senior Editor, Daily Beast; Co-Author, "ISIS: Inside the Army of Terror"
Speakers
Nada Bakos, Former Analyst, Central Intelligence Agency
Tony Blair, Former Prime Minister, Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Lindsey Graham, U.S. Senator, South Carolina
Brett McGurk, Special Presidential Envoy, Global Coalition to Counter ISIL, U.S. State Department
1:15 pm - 2:00 pm
International Ballroom
Moderator
Jared Bernstein, Economic Policy Fellow, Milken Institute; Senior Fellow, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities; Former Chief Economist to Vice President Joe Biden
Speaker
Jacob J. Lew, Secretary, U.S. Department of the Treasury
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Dayton
The commissioners of the professional football, basketball, baseball, soccer and hockey leagues all want team owners who have the qualities to build successful sports franchises. When Gary Bettman became NHL commissioner in 1993, the league had 24 teams and revenue of $400 million. Under his guidance, the NHL has added six new teams and a major television contract that has helped it achieve revenue exceeding $3 billion. Meanwhile, interest and participation in hockey throughout the United States is at an all-time high with kids across the country lacing up their skates and fans packing arenas in every region. That helps explain why Bettman was named 2014 Sports Executive of the Year. But it hasn't all been smooth skating, with ownership changes and periods of labor unrest testing his leadership. He and the NHL have emerged stronger than ever and he affably hosts a weekly national radio show in a direct dialogue with fans.
Moderator
Jared Carney, Founder and CEO, Lightdale, LLC
Speaker
Gary Bettman, Commissioner, National Hockey League
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
International Gallery
Amid plummeting commodity prices and the prospect of higher interest rates in the U.S., some contend that the window of opportunity for direct foreign investment in Africa and other developing regions has come to a close. Yes, optimists point to the longer-term potential that Africa, with its young population and an improved policy environment, holds for investors. Where are the opportunities in Africa, and how can financial markets be leveraged to benefit both investors and host countries? This private Africa Working Group session will explore the current outlook as well as opportunities for investments in infrastructure, local supply chains and capital markets.
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
International Ballroom
In our annual look at the issues shaping global credit markets, Institute Chairman Mike Milken moderates a discussion with leading investors. Some of the questions the panel will address include: What is the outlook for rates, and how are fixed-income investors preparing? What tools for hedging credit risk are most useful in today's environment? How are regulatory changes affecting issuance of collateralized loan obligations? In structured credit, where is the best value and which areas are investors shunning? How are managers using credit default swaps these days, and how have those instruments evolved over the past decade? What impact is commodity price volatility having on credit markets? Which non-U.S. markets are attractive today, and where will the opportunities be in the near future? What areas of the credit markets make you optimistic, and which keep you up at night?
Moderator
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Speakers
Richard Byrne, President, Benefit Street Partners, Providence Equity Partners
Scott Minerd, Managing Partner, Chairman of Investments and Global Chief Investment Officer, Guggenheim Partners
Joseph Naggar, Partner and Senior Portfolio Manager, GoldenTree Asset Management
David Warren, CEO, Chief Investment Officer and Founding Partner, DW Partners LP
James Zelter, Managing Partner, Apollo Global Management; CEO, Apollo Investment Corp.
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
International Terrace
As the 2016 general election approaches, polarization and partisanship are as pronounced as ever. Income inequality and climate change appear to be important to Democrats, while immigration, national defense and taxes rank high among Republicans. And the usual party establishment candidates are being strongly challenged by outsiders who have gained support from frustrated, angry voters. What are the best strategies for each party to win the presidential election? And how are the key House and Senate races shaping up? Our expert panel of pundits will face off and make predictions on how the chips will fall in November and which issues will matter most to voters.
Moderator
Candy Crowley, Former Chief Political Correspondent, CNN
Speakers
Evan Bayh, Senior Advisor, Apollo Global Management; Partner, McGuireWoods LLC; Former U.S. Senator, Indiana
Eric Cantor, Vice Chairman and Managing Director, Moelis & Co.; Former Majority Leader, U.S. House of Representatives
Jason Grumet, Founder and President, Bipartisan Policy Center
Chris Krueger, Managing Director and Washington Strategist, Guggenheim Securities
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Canon
Global demand for food will rise as the world’s population surpasses 9 billion by 2050. The changing climate continues to challenge food productivity, especially in areas stricken with poverty and famine. At the same time, more and more of our food is grown and processed far from where we live and eat. The global food supply chain has cut costs and expanded the diets of people around the world. However, the increasing length and complexity of the supply network also raises concerns about health and safety. Will there be sufficient food for all? How can enough be distributed to the most vulnerable people? How can we be sure the food we buy is fit to eat? What are the national and international benchmarks for purity and sanitation, and who is checking that producers, shippers and retailers are meeting them? Our panelists will explore imminent food safety challenges through the prism of supranational and government bodies. They also will compare conditions across countries and encourage stakeholders to act.
Moderator
Cristina Alesci, Correspondent, CNN and CNNMoney
Speakers
Pierre Ferrari, President and CEO, Heifer International
Marc LePage, President and CEO, Genome Canada
Kimbal Musk, Co-Founder, The Kitchen; Board Member, Chipotle Mexican Grill
Martin Short, CEO, Power of Nutrition
Kenneth Simril, President and CEO, Fleischmann's Ingredients
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Pavilion
Disruptive technologies are fundamentally changing how we live and rewiring the way we work and travel. Yet cities seem to be left struggling to maintain infrastructure built for another era. Is it time for a reboot? Innovative players who use fresh technology, such as shared-economy companies, will have a powerful influence on how our cities look and the way governments pursue and pay for infrastructure to meet the demands of population growth, traffic congestion, the housing crunch, climate change and more. This session will focus on opportunities for collaborations that leverage the changes influencing our lives to make cities more competitive, resilient and better prepared for the future.
Moderator
Michael Burke, Chairman and CEO, AECOM
Speakers
Brogan BamBrogan, Co-Founder and Chief Technical Officer, Hyperloop Technologies
Dale Bonner, Senior Advisor, Milken Institute; Executive Chairman, Plenary Concessions
Eric Garcetti, Mayor, City of Los Angeles
Artie Minson, President and Chief Operating Officer, WeWork
David Plouffe, Chief Advisor and Board Member, Uber
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Brighton
Doing well by accomplishing good is the goal of every socially conscious investor. Despite the demand for products that provide both financial and social return, the opportunities are still limited. While investment vehicles from microfinance funds to private equity and structured-debt products are proliferating, it remains difficult to access deals and even harder to track performance. The word about these investment opportunities and solid information about their impact and financial returns need to reach a much wider audience. Panelists will single out successful investment products across asset classes and sectors and suggest how to provide investors with better historical performance information and more solid outlooks.
Moderator
Amit Bouri, CEO, Global Impact Investing Network
Speakers
John Chiang, Treasurer, State of California
Tony Davis, Founder, Managing Partner and CEO, Inherent Group
Giles Gunesekera, CEO, Global Impact Initiative
Amy O’Brien, Managing Director and Head of Responsible Investment, TIAA Global Asset Management
Deval Patrick, Managing Director, Bain Capital; Former Governor, Massachusetts
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Palm
As the world becomes more digitally connected, how we work and live is changing in ways unfathomable just a few decades ago. These changes carry great promise: better health, improved education for our children, more entertainment choices, less drudge work. At the same time, technology is creating economic disruption, with computers and robots taking over many of the jobs that humans used to do. Demand for the most creative, educated and entrepreneurial workers is on the rise, while middle managers and those with basic skills are finding themselves replaced by technology. Should workers be worried? Are the fears of technology taking over human jobs overblown? And what, if anything, can governments do to ensure that people -- especially those with basic skills -- have jobs? This panel will tackle the questions of just how much technological advances will affect the job market and what our employment future looks like. Some of their answers may surprise you.
Moderator
Dennis Kneale, Member, Sitrick and Co.; Principal, Dennis Kneale Media
Speakers
Michael Chui, Partner, McKinsey Global Institute
Martin Ford, Author; Entrepreneur
Alan Krueger, Bendheim Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Princeton University; Former Chairman, White House Council of Economic Advisers
Kate Mitchell, Co-Founder and Partner, Scale Venture Partners
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Maple
Author and activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali is calling for a reform of Islam. In her book "Heretic: Why Islam Needs A Reformation Now," the native Somalian argues that the oppression and violence often associated with Islam is not the result of social or economic conditions, but is rooted in the religion's basic texts. The violence will end, she says, only if Muslims' perception of their religion changes. Ali's perspective reflects personal experience as a young girl growing up in Somalia and later as a refugee and political activist in Holland and the U.S. Her books, speeches and film collaborations about the treatment of women in traditional Islamic societies have gained her praise as well as criticism. Now an American citizen, Ali will talk about her life and her views on Islam in this frank one-on-one conversation.
Moderator
Mary Hart, TV Host
Speaker
Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Founder, AHA Foundation; Fellow, Future of Diplomacy Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Whittier Room
The promise of Bitcoin has been overshadowed by its underlying technology, the blockchain. There is great interest from traditional financial firms, which, saddled with decades-old payment infrastructures, are eager to adapt to the digital realities and improve the efficiency, speed and transparency of transactions. Efforts are underway at the national and international levels to study and monitor the blockchain, and a consortium of large international banks is collaborating on how to bring Bitcoin's technology to bear in the financial marketplace. How can this technology deliver for the financial services industry? Can we expect to see widespread use of these new systems in the near future and, if so, how will they change finance? Are we likely to see movement toward private rather than public blockchains, and how will this affect transparency and security?
Moderator
Marc Hochstein, Editor-in-Chief, American Banker
Speakers
Brian Forde, Director, Digital Currency, MIT Media Lab
Jalak Jobanputra, Founding Partner, FuturePerfect Ventures
Leanne Kemp, Founder and CEO, Everledger
Margaret Liu, Senior Vice President and Deputy General Counsel, Conference of State Bank Supervisors
Steve Wager, Executive Vice President, Operations and Development, itBit
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Wilshire Ballroom
As the price of oil has fallen to levels not seen in more than a decade, the oversupply and weak demand globally may mean the new era of cheap oil will be with us for a while. The dislocations have been many, from the damaged energy-dependent economies of countries such as Russia and Venezuela to battered global stock markets. Even so, most oil-producing states are moving full steam ahead on production, including Iran, which could add up to as much as 500,000 barrels a day to global markets. As the International Energy Agency recently said, "Unless something changes, the oil market could drown in oversupply." Is cheap oil the new normal? If so, what are the implications? What is the impact for the U.S. economy, energy production, the move to renewables, climate change, geopolitics and capital markets?
Moderator
Brian Sullivan, Anchor, CNBC
Speakers
Greg Beard, Global Head of Natural Resources and Senior Partner, Apollo Global Management
Lisa Murkowski, U.S. Senator, Alaska; Chairman, Committee on Energy and Natural Resources
Michael Smith, Chairman and CEO, Freeport LNG
William Sonneborn, President, EIG Global Energy Partners
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Oakhurst
Every day, people around the planet connect 6.4 billion devices to the Internet, and every minute spend $2.5 million on new hardware for the Internet of Things (IoT). By 2020, the amount of Internet-connected things may reach 50 billion. Also by then, IoT will have grown into a $1.46 trillion international market, compared with $700 billion last year, research firm IDC predicts. In this invitation-only session, business leaders will dissect how the Internet of Things transforms the customer experience and potentially rewards the most innovative companies with huge new revenue streams.
Moderator
Sumant Mandal, Managing Director and Co-Founder, March Capital Partners
Speakers
Bridget Karlin, Managing Director, IoT Strategy and Integrated Products Division, Internet of Things Group, Intel Corp.
Judith McKenna, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Walmart U.S.
Gary Shapiro, President and CEO, Consumer Technology Association
Mark Wilson, Chief Evangelist, BlackBerry
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Beverly Hills Ballroom
Entrepreneurs are among the most dynamic drivers of global economic growth, and women are laying claim to the role in greater numbers than ever. In the U.S., for example, research shows that women-owned businesses are growing at twice the rate of all others. Yet, according to the World Bank, women continue to face enormous obstacles, including powerful social constraints, limited time and a lack of training. How have today's most successful female entrepreneurs triumphed over the most challenging circumstances, and what still threatens to derail them? How can we continue to expand opportunities for women to truly level the playing field?
Moderator
Rick Smith, Co-Founder and Managing Director, CrossCut Ventures
Speakers
Jessica Alba, Founder and Chief Creative Officer, The Honest Company
Susan Feldman, Co- Founder, One Kings Lane
Sheila Lirio Marcelo, Founder, Chairwoman and CEO, Care.com
Alexandra Wilkis Wilson, Co-Founder and CEO, Glamsquad; Co-Founder and Strategic Advisor, Gilt
Debbie Wosskow, CEO, Love Home Swap
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Canon
China is one of the world's most alluring markets, but gaining access to it has not been simple for investors. To be sure, the government's reforms of the past few decades have created a market-driven economy that has further opened the nation to the world. However, recent interventions in response to the decline in equity markets and the devaluation of the yuan showed Beijing's propensity to control capital movements and shield its economy from market forces. In the wake of this, investors are struggling to understand the thinking behind government policy and, as a result, their confidence is on the wane. In this session, our panel of experts look at how to translate recent events in the Chinese markets. How should investors adjust their portfolios and strategies for 2016? What is necessary to rebuild confidence in the market?
Moderator
Lucy Colback, Editor, Asia Lex, Financial Times
Speakers
Robert Petty, Managing Partner and Co-Founder, Clearwater Capital Partners
Edwin Wong, Managing Partner and Chief Investment Officer, SSG Capital Management
Larry Zhang, Managing Director and Head of Public Equity, China Investment Corp.
Patrick Zhong, Senior Managing Director and Head of Global Investments and Strategies, Fosun International
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Beverly Hills Ballroom
Experts agree that meditation is beneficial for overall health. It can calm and "center" us, and even lower our blood pressure. But can daily meditation also spur physiological changes in the brain? Research shows that regular meditation can actually enlarge the area of the brain that governs learning, memory and decision-making, and reduce the part responsible for fear, anxiety and stress. Meet the experts who can prove these benefits and more, from surviving a plane crash to minimizing reliance on mood-altering medication and raising happy kids.
Moderator
Mallika Chopra, Founder, Intent.com; Author, "Living with Intent"
Speakers
Goldie Hawn, Actress; Founder, Hawn Foundation
Sara Lazar, Associate Investigator, Massachusetts General Hospital; Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School
Allan Lokos, Founder and Guiding Teacher, Community Meditation Center; Author
Russell Simmons, Entrepreneur, Author, Activist and Philanthropist
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Brighton
India is giving the developed world a run for its money in high-value innovation. The country has the world's third-largest number of startups, which received record levels of investment last year. The "leapfrog" technologies out of India, especially in mobile, have positioned the country for more rapid economic development, with the potential to lift millions of people out of poverty. Government data pegged India's growth rate in 2015 as the fastest of any major economy. But while India established itself long ago as a hub for software development and back-office services, does it have what it takes to become a global center for innovation? This panel will explore some of the digital innovations that have emerged from India, and how they are transforming the economy and setting the scene for future tech development. It will also look at ways India's government can foster an entrepreneurial ecosystem and culture to drive innovation to new heights.
Moderator
Reuben Abraham, Asia Fellow, Milken Institute; CEO and Senior Fellow, IDFC Institute
Speakers
Sahil Kini, Principal, Aspada Investments
Arvind Pani, Co-Founder and CEO, Reverie Language Technologies
Abhishek Sinha, Co-Founder and CEO, Eko India Financial Services
Vivek Wadhwa, Fellow, Stanford Law School; Director of Research, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Maple
Military experience shapes personal skills, values and experiences that are advantageous beyond the battlefield. History, in fact, suggests that most of the 165,000 people who transition each year from military to civilian workforces succeed, and their numbers include many of the nation's business executives. Could the military and civilian worlds collaborate more effectively to bolster corporate performance while equipping military personnel for meaningful service outside the armed forces? This panel of military veterans and corporate leaders will help illuminate the unique skill sets that make veterans attractive prospects to employers. They will discuss how companies can do a better job of harnessing veterans' skills and experiences and how they can capture aspects of military culture to benefit their own businesses.
Moderator
Susan Fallon Brown, Vice President, Global Strategy and Business Development, Monster Government Solutions
Speakers
Greg Behrman, Founder, CEO and Editor-in-Chief, NationSwell
Brendan Hart, Co-Founder and CEO, Prosper Labs; CEO, ThriveX
Christopher Perkins, Managing Director and Global Head of OTC Clearing, Citi; Founder, Citi's Military Veterans Network; Co-Founder, Veterans on Wall Street
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Stardust
Many energy companies and investors have struggled to adapt their business models to the new global energy landscape since the price of oil peaked in June 2014. Yet this dislocation is creating opportunities for savvy players who are willing to sift through the details. How are astute energy companies restructuring their balance sheets? For investors, which parts of the capital structure are presenting the best balance of safety and probability of high returns? Where does renewable-energy investment stand in light of fossil fuel prices? This roundtable of investors will look at the near- and long-term challenges and opportunities of investing in energy.
Moderator
Carl Meyer, Chief Investment Officer, Silver Rock Financial
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Board Room
One of the greatest challenges facing American cities is 20th century infrastructure. Some urban experts say cities should look to new, technology-based approaches that could solve or ease the problems created by outdated infrastructure instead of replacing it. Already, pioneers of the shared economy have successfully introduced disruptive ideas such as ride- and apartment-sharing, which are changing the way we live, work and play. Innovative technologies clearly will have a powerful influence on how our cities look and function in the 21st century and on the quality of urban life. This session will focus on the opportunities for new collaborations to leverage technology and reimagine cities that are more livable, competitive, resilient and better prepared for the future.
Moderator
Michael Burke, Chairman and CEO, AECOM
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
International Terrace
The private market for mortgage credit risk evaporated after the financial crisis. At the peak of the crisis, the default risk on more than 90 percent of new mortgage production was explicitly backed by taxpayers, principally through the FHA and VA loan programs and through the Treasury Department's financial support of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Even today, taxpayers still back roughly three of every four new mortgages through these entities. The past several years have seen efforts by regulators, lawmakers and market participants to further reduce taxpayer risk, but the process has been slow. Since 2013, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have been experimenting with credit risk transfer deals in which they sell some portion of the mortgage credit risk on new mortgages to market participants. Since 2014, the Treasury Department has directly engaged with industry to restart the private mortgage securitization market. This panel will assess the progress to date with these efforts and explore the conditions necessary for a restoration of a deep and liquid market for mortgage credit risk backed by private capital rather than taxpayers.
Moderator
Ed DeMarco, Senior Fellow in Residence, Milken Institute Center for Financial Markets; Former Acting Director, Federal Housing Finance Agency
Speakers
Lindsey Johnson, President and Executive Director, U.S. Mortgage Insurers
Stanford Kurland, Founder, Chairman and CEO, PennyMac Financial Services Inc.
Ed Royce, U.S. Representative, California; Chairman, House Foreign Affairs Committee
Bryan Whalen, Group Managing Director, U.S. Fixed Income, TCW
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Palm
Climate change has become an everyday topic of conversation and, despite differences in opinion over how to respond to global warming, almost everyone recognizes the need to conserve and to reduce the dependency on burning carbon as a source of energy. Policymakers, investors and consumers who debate this issue need to add something else to the conversation: the question of what sustainable development looks like and what it will mean for governments, industry and individuals. This panel brings together those in the vanguard of creating new initiatives for investing in community development and exposing investors and developers to novel financing tools and out-of-the-box thinking on a wide variety of projects. Join us as we gather institutional investors, governments and developers to discuss how they are building this new infrastructure for sustainable community development.
Moderator
John McArthur, Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution; Senior Fellow, United Nations Foundation
Speakers
Reyaz Ahmad, Chief Investment Officer and Head, Fund of Funds Group, Asset Management Co., IFC
Christopher Ailman, Chief Investment Officer, California State Teachers’ Retirement System; Co-Chair, Global Capital Markets Advisory Council, Milken Institute
Aimée Christensen, CEO, Christensen Global Strategies; Executive Director, Sun Valley Institute for Resilience
David Rae, Head of Investment Analysis, New Zealand Superannuation Fund
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
International Gallery
Interventions such as the Japanese central bank's decision to implement negative interest rates have fallen short in stimulating the nation's economy. If not monetary policy or fiscal stimulus, what other strategies might Japan's government have to pave a new path to growth? At this private roundtable, senior government officials and investors share their views on which policies show promise in reforming and reviving the economy.
Moderator
Kotaro Tamura, Asia Fellow, Milken Institute; Chairman, Japan Intelligence Initiative; Former Senator and Parliamentary Secretary for Economic and Fiscal Policy, Japan
Speakers
Yasuhide Nakayama, Member, House of Representatives, Japan; Former State Minister for Foreign Affairs, Japan
Scott Sato, President and Chief Operating Officer, Pasona Inc.
Tokihiko Shimizu, Managing Director and Head of Private Markets Investments, Japan Post Bank
Tatsunao Sugiura, CEO, WellnessSmile
Masashi Takahashi, CEO, Voyagin
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Wilshire Ballroom
The high-yield bond market has rallied again in recent months after a selloff that drove yields to their highest levels since 2011. The market was hit hard in 2015 and early 2016 by worries about slowing global growth and the collapse of energy prices—which slammed the bonds of many oil and gas companies. Lately, growth fears have eased and oil prices have recouped some of their losses. But many investors remain concerned about other potential threats to high-yield, including credit tightening by the Federal Reserve, prolonged weakness in emerging-market economies and the rising tide of corporate debt maturing between 2018 and 2022. Are central bank policies, including negative interest rates in Europe, supportive or hazardous for high-yield? Which industries offer the best value prospects for investors now? On this panel, leaders in high-yield and leveraged finance will share their outlooks and strategies.
Moderator
Tom Braithwaite, Lex Writer, Financial Times
Speakers
Christopher Boyle, Managing Director and Portfolio Manager, Guggenheim Partners
Peter Budko, Partner, AR Global
Henry Chyung, Chief Investment Officer, Post Advisory Group
Robert Kricheff, Global Strategist and High-Yield Portfolio Manager, Shenkman Capital
Andrew Whittaker, Vice Chairman, Jefferies; Vice Chairman, Leucadia National Corp.
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Whittier Room
Water is the essential ingredient to life. Yet, the growing demand for food, energy and development is placing enormous pressure on the global water supply. Groundwater aquifers, which hold 95 percent of available fresh water, are being depleted in large areas of the world. In other regions clean water is scarce. The U.N. estimates that by 2025, two-thirds of the world’s population will live in water-stressed areas. Achieving water security, while protecting biodiversity, requires that we seek solutions on an unprecedented scale. How can we effectively conserve, manage and distribute water? What innovations in technology, research and policy are needed to build a more resilient water system? With a greater understanding of the challenges and new tools available, can we navigate organizational and geopolitical systems to build a more resilient world?
Moderator
Diane Regas, Executive Director, Environmental Defense Fund
Speakers
Christine Cioffe, Senior Vice President, Strategy and Portfolio Management, Global R&D, PepsiCo Inc.
Monica Ellis, CEO, Global Environment & Technology Foundation
Robert MacLean, President, California American Water and Hawaii American Water
Seth Siegel, Lawyer, Activist and Entrepreneur; Author, "Let There Be Water"
Gary White, CEO and Co-Founder, Water.org
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Pavilion
Europe's crisis is worsening as waves of refugees and migrants continue to cross the Mediterranean Sea seeking haven from conflicts and poverty in the Middle East and Africa. More than a million people made the journey in 2015 and, according to some forecasts, the number may be triple that by the end of this year. For European governments, the crisis has grown from a logistical nightmare into a political tinderbox as the cultural divide between newcomers and citizens has strained compassion. This panel, composed of media experts, journalists and representatives of migrant and refugee communities, will identify the most urgent challenges and assess the options and best potential responses to the influx of people. Some of the challenges are clear, but what are the potential benefits of the migration? Should migrants seeking to escape poverty be treated differently than refugees fleeing war? How has news coverage influenced public opinion and national and international policies?
Moderator
Nicholas Kristof, Columnist, New York Times
Speakers
Nancy Aossey, President and CEO, International Medical Corps
Paul Collier, Senior Fellow, Milken Institute; Professor of Economics and Public Policy, Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford
Peter Laugharn, President and CEO, Conrad N. Hilton Foundation
David Miliband, President and CEO, International Rescue Committee; Former Foreign Secretary, United Kingdom
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
International Ballroom
Eight years after the greatest financial crisis since the Great Depression, countries continue to implement new regulations designed to avert another downturn. Leverage ratios are shrinking and expenses are being scrutinized more than ever, forcing executives to reevaluate their workforces and find solutions that often replace employees with technology. Many are focusing their hiring on compliance and technology specialists instead of traders and salespeople. What strategies have they adopted to prevent the loss of talented employees? How are financial-services companies adapting their business models? Are more specialized firms emerging to challenge universal banks? Who is best positioned to take advantage of the opportunities embedded in these transformations? Our panel will examine the issues and trends that will set the direction for finance in 2016 and beyond.
Moderator
Timothy O'Hara, Managing Director and CEO, Global Markets, Credit Suisse; President and CEO, Credit Suisse Holdings
Speakers
Emanuel Friedman, CEO, EJF Capital
Paul Hamill, Global Head, Fixed Income, Currencies and Commodities, Citadel Securities
Timothy Massad, Chairman, U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission
Stephen Schwarzman, Chairman, CEO and Co-Founder, Blackstone
Darryl White, CEO, BMO Capital Markets
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm
Dayton
Innovations that enable faster payment processing -- at or near real time -- are changing how people around the globe use money. Even the U.S., a relative laggard, is seeing movement by both industry and government. The proliferation of these new payment solutions may call into question the future of traditional services like cards, checks and the existing interbank infrastructure. Yet the outcome is far from clear. We know that the use of faster payment systems is growing, but is there enough demand that they might actually displace traditional services? Furthermore, the impact of faster settlement on the economy may not be fully understood. What are the risks and the advantages for consumers, merchants and governments?
Moderator
Jackson Mueller, Policy Research Analyst, Center for Financial Markets, Milken Institute
Speakers
Daniel Gonzalez, Vice President, Payment Industry Relations, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
Jordan Lampe, Director of Communications and Policy Affairs, Dwolla
Jane Larimer, Executive Vice President and General Counsel, ACH Network Administration & General Counsel, NACHA
Shivani Siroya, Founder and CEO, InVenture
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
International Ballroom
John Sculley convinced millions to take the Pepsi Challenge and helped sell Macintosh computers with Apple's famous "1984" Super Bowl ad. But with the advent of smartphones, social media and the Cloud, the power to control the message is shifting to consumers, as Sculley writes in his latest book, "Moonshot! Game-Changing Strategies to Build Billion-Dollar Businesses." In this session, Sculley sits down with David Steinberg--with whom he co-founded Zeta Interactive--for a conversation about the Web's upending of almost all the tried-and-true methods of marketing. Sculley and Steinberg will analyze what this means for companies small and large, and their relationships with customers.
Moderator
Peter L. Hopkins , Co-Founder and President, Big Think
Speakers
John Sculley, Businessman, Entrepreneur and Investor; Former CEO, Apple Computer
David A. Steinberg, CEO, Zeta Interactive
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Wilshire Ballroom
Investors and leaders around the world increasingly recognize the opportunities that abound just south of the U.S. border. Mexico is the world's 15th-largest economy, and with its young population, the nation is poised to continue its ascent as a global powerhouse. The positive factors are undeniable: booming manufacturing exports in vehicle production and other areas, strong trade ties with the United States, abundant natural resources, a growing middle class and a renewed push for more open markets with fewer, smarter regulations. In fact, contrary to popular perception, more Mexicans are leaving the U.S. than entering. Mexico's challenges are significant, too. Critics question the nation's ability to maintain rule of law and reduce crime. Mexico's educational outcomes lag other major economies, half of the population lives in poverty, an obesity epidemic imposes significant social and economic costs and depressed oil prices are confounding one of the country's most important industries. Join a panel of prominent leaders discussing Mexico's future.
Moderator
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Speakers
Thaddeus Arroyo, CEO, AT&T Mexico
Pedro Aspe, Chairman, Evercore Partners Mexico
Francisco González Díaz, CEO, ProMéxico
Alan Schwartz, Executive Chairman, Guggenheim Partners LLC
Blanca Treviño, President and CEO, Softtek
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Oakhurst
In this private session, Milken Institute researchers will preview their forthcoming study on the epidemiologic and economic effects of increased obesity levels in the United States. The study will include estimates of the obesity-related costs paid by individuals and households, employers and government, and it relies on the latest scientific data sources to define the prevalence of 23 conditions associated with obesity as well as their costs. The researchers will discuss the most effective public and workplace-based interventions to address this epidemic. What can we learn from the anti-smoking campaign that succeeded in cutting tobacco use? How can we impact public policy and alter the current trajectory?
Presenters
Ross DeVol, Chief Research Officer, Milken Institute
Hugh Waters, Health Economist and Associate Professor, Schools of Nursing and Public Health, University of North Carolina
5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Poolside - West
6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Pavilion
Leaders understand that to solve our most serious problems, they must join forces with other like-minded people who are prepared to use their influence for good. The water crisis in Flint, Mich., is a case in point. Iconic singer and actress Cher teamed up with Mayor Karen Weaver to bring more than 180,000 bottles of water to the city, and they've continued to use their influence to keep the national spotlight on the issue. But many feel that the problem in Flint is just the tip of the iceberg -- that other communities throughout the United States are also at risk due to pipe corrosion and decaying infrastructure. Join us for a powerful discussion about leadership, activism and what it takes to be a change-maker.
Welcome Remarks
Susan Santiago, Senior Vice President, Americas Operational Experiences, Hyatt Hotels Corp.
Introduction By
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Moderator
Shaun Robinson, Television Host; Author; Producer; Philanthropist
Speakers
Cher, Singer and Actress
John McArthur, Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution; Senior Fellow, United Nations Foundation
Karen Weaver, Mayor, City of Flint, Michigan
Gary White, CEO and Co-Founder, Water.org
Closing Remarks
Katie O'Reilly, Executive Director, Business and Program Development, Milken Institute
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Stardust
6:30 pm - 9:30 pm
Gagosian Gallery
Wednesday, May 4, 2016
5:45 am - 7:00 am
Flywheel West Hollywood
6:00 am - 8:15 am
Beverly Hills Ballroom Foyer
7:00 am - 8:00 am
Stardust
In a still-uncertain global economy, strengthening California's position as a global nexus for trade, manufacturing and technological innovation is more important than ever. In this private session, Gov. Jerry Brown will discuss challenges facing the state, including the need to develop a 21st century workforce and mitigate the effects of the lingering drought.
Introduction By
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Speaker
Jerry Brown, Governor, California
7:00 am - 8:30 am
International Gallery
This private session will convene active-duty service members from our Military Leadership Circle as well as prominent veterans who successfully transitioned into the workplace and executives from companies that actively support veterans’ reintegration. Participants will discuss ways to help those who have served on the frontlines support economic growth in their communities and share leadership lessons from the private sector that military personnel can apply to their jobs in the armed services.
Moderator
Matt Driskill, Lieutenant Commander and Operations Officer, Electronic Attack Squadron 129, U.S. Navy
8:15 am - 9:30 am
Stardust
It's often noted that the State of California is the eighth-largest economy in the world. Less well known is the fact that Los Angeles County has more than a quarter of the state's population and each of its five county supervisors has two million constituents. In fact, the county's population is greater than that of 43 U.S. states and each supervisor has more constituents than 15 state governors. With that kind of political influence, these public servants have unique insights into what it takes to keep government working effectively for the people. In a frank roundtable discussion, LA County Supervisors Mark Ridley-Thomas and Hilda Solis will weigh in on the issues of greatest area concern.
Moderator
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Speakers
Mark Ridley-Thomas, Member, Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, 2nd District
Hilda Solis, Member, Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors; Former U.S. Secretary of Labor
8:30 am - 9:45 am
International Ballroom
Intensifying global competition, flagging corporate earnings and emboldened activist investors have stoked fresh debate over "short-termism" in investing. Even as Warren Buffett's buy-and-hold-forever strategy continues to be celebrated, many big-name companies have been targeted for overhaul by activists in an effort to quickly boost shareholder value. That's resurrecting 1980s-style questions about whether short-term measures to drive returns could be ruinous for companies--and the economy--in the long run. Corporate managements themselves have been accused of short-termism in recent years for borrowing heavily to fund stock buybacks in the name of returning capital to investors. This panel of major asset owners will provide perspective on long-term investing and their roles as capital allocators. When does economic responsibility trump fiduciary responsibility?
Moderator
Scott Minerd, Managing Partner, Chairman of Investments and Global Chief Investment Officer, Guggenheim Partners
Speakers
Christopher Ailman, Chief Investment Officer, California State Teachers’ Retirement System; Co-Chair, Global Capital Markets Advisory Council, Milken Institute
Scott Evans, Deputy Comptroller, Asset Management, and Chief Investment Officer, New York City Retirement Systems
Vicki Fuller, Chief Investment Officer, New York State Common Retirement Fund
Hiromichi Mizuno, Executive Managing Director and Chief Investment Officer, Government Pension Investment Fund, Japan
8:30 am - 9:45 am
Wilshire Ballroom
Cities are the economic engines that power the global economy. For decades economic clout has been concentrated primarily in the major cities of the developed world. But the geography of power is shifting as urban centers in emerging regions of Asia and Latin America play a larger, more assertive role in manufacturing, commerce and finance. The list of the 600 top-performing cities, which account for 60 percent of global GDP, will change dramatically over the next decade as scores of First World cities are overtaken in GDP by cities in China, India and Latin America. By 2025, 136 new cities are expected to enter the top 600, including 100 from China alone. This panel will identify some of the cities that will drive this change, as well as patterns of growth and demographic shifts that will emerge over the next generation.
Moderator
Conrad Kiechel, Managing Director, Communications, Milken Institute
Speakers
Fahd Al-Rasheed, Group CEO and Managing Director, Emaar Economic City
Byron Boston, President, CEO and Co-Chief Investment Officer, Dynex Capital
Marc Morial, President and CEO, National Urban League; Former Mayor, New Orleans
Naheed A. Nenshi, Mayor, City of Calgary, Canada
8:30 am - 9:45 am
Beverly Hills Ballroom
In the wake of 9/11, the US Treasury has, with increasing success, gone after the financial jugular of organized crime, drug dealers, the illegal arms trade, and terrorist networks. This has meant both using financial trails to track down criminals as well as directly cordoning off individuals, banks, and entire countries from access to the international banking system. In the wake of the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the North Korean attack on Sony, the US has increasingly used financial sanctions to execute precision sanctions against specific individuals. These success of these tactics— black lists, name and shame strategies, huge fines on banks for non-compliance, and a host of international arrangements to help developing countries upgrade their regulatory frameworks — has brought Treasury from being a two-bit player to the center of US intelligence and anti-terrorism efforts. In response, though, global correspondent banks have made a risk-benefit calculation and increasingly determined that the basis points that they make on correspondent banking and other similar agency services is not worth the reputational and financial risk of making mistakes. And this is leading to the financial exclusion of banks, sectors, and countries, with negative impacts on development and even financial intelligence goals. This panel will describe the strategy and impact of these counter-terrorism financial measures, and examine new thinking to help mitigate the problems of "de-risking".
Moderator
Staci Warden, Executive Director, Center for Financial Markets, Milken Institute
Speakers
Timothy Adams, President and CEO, Institute of International Finance; Former Under Secretary for International Affairs, U.S. Department of the Treasury
Christine Duhaime, Founder, Digital Finance Institute
John Dye, Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, Western Union
Matthew Epstein, CEO, The Camstoll Group
Farley Mesko, CEO and Co-Founder, Sayari Analytics
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Beverly Hills Ballroom
Couple a seven-year bull market with ultra-low interest rates, and you have a troubling outlook for investors big and small: It's hard to see conventional stock and bond investments generating hefty returns in the next few years. That is prompting more investors to consider allocating capital to "alternative" strategies -- everything from gold and managed futures accounts to commercial mortgages and private equity. Many advisors tout alternative investments as a way to dampen volatility in portfolios that are mostly invested in stocks and bonds. But the downsides of alternatives tend to be high management fees and low liquidity. Join industry experts who'll discuss where to find the most attractive alternative investment opportunities.
Moderator
Tom Petruno, Financial Journalist and Consultant; Former Markets Editor and Columnist, Los Angeles Times
Speakers
Jonathan Grunzweig, Executive Director and Global Head, Special Situations, Colony Capital Inc.
Jodie Gunzberg, Global Head, Commodities and Real Assets, S&P Dow Jones Indices
Jonathan Rotolo, CEO and Chief Investment Officer, Wood Creek Capital Management
Scott Sperling, Co-President, Thomas H. Lee Partners
Carrie Thome, Director of Investments, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation
10:00 am - 11:00 am
International Terrace
Despite first-quarter setbacks, biotech has had a remarkable run over the past five years. The stocks of biotech companies have outperformed the market, and the industry has seen substantial increases in public and private equity investment, mergers and acquisitions and IPOs during that period. Exciting new drugs are coming out, and novel R&D collaborations are filling the pipeline for the future. Yet behind those numbers there may be cause for concern. For example, research spending is declining, and venture fund flows to the life sciences are low relative to other fields. Uncertainties about drug pricing and payment models persist. In the next five years, will biotech boom or go bust?
Moderator
Luke Timmerman, Founder and Editor, Timmerman Report
Speakers
Alex Denner, Chief Investment Officer and Founding Partner, Sarissa Capital
Bob Hugin, Executive Chairman, Celgene Corp.
Annalisa Jenkins, CEO, Dimension Therapeutics
John Reed, Global Head of Pharma Research and Early Development, Roche Group
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Maple
The digital revolution that began in California's Silicon Valley has spread around the world as innovators adopt its creative, disruptive culture and even its name. We now have Silicon Oasis, Silicon Cape, Silicon Docks and more. What they share, more than a name, is the vision of groundbreaking research with the potential for social change and lucrative commercial applications. California remains the primary incubator, as well as the model, for global innovation. Yet, as the new tech centers mature and as Silicon Valley companies expand beyond California, the synergy is changing from emulation to collaboration. How can the world's tech regions better cultivate this spirit of cooperation? How can business and policy leaders harness it to advance research and foster new breakthroughs?
Moderator
Kevin Klowden, Executive Director, California Center, and Managing Economist, Milken Institute
Speakers
Bracken Darrell, President and CEO, Logitech
Gil Elbaz, CEO, Factual
Adam Miller, Founder and CEO, Cornerstone OnDemand
Donna Morris, Executive Vice President, Customer and Employee Experience, Adobe Systems Inc.
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Canon
New tools that enable the precise editing of DNA are regarded as "game changers" that will revolutionize all areas of science and medicine. Clinical trials are underway to use genome editing to treat diseases in children such as severe combined immunodeficiency and sickle cell anemia. The ability to permanently correct chronic conditions will reduce disease burden and improve quality of life. Human genome editing, which has the potential to permanently alter DNA in successive generations, has been the subject of international science policy deliberations that seek to develop a framework for applying the technology in biomedical research, with a particular emphasis on generational effects. This session will discuss editing technologies and the ethical considerations underlying the science policy debate.
Moderator
Jonathan Thomas, Chairman, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine
Speakers
David Agus, Professor of Medicine and Engineering, University of Southern California; Director, USC Center for Applied Molecular Medicine
David Baltimore, Nobel Laureate; President Emeritus and Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Biology, California Institute of Technology
Amander Clark, Professor and Vice Chair, Department of Molecular Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Los Angeles
Hank Greely, Director, Center for Law and the Biosciences, Stanford Law School
10:00 am - 11:00 am
International Gallery
For more than two decades, the Milken Institute has been dedicated to creating an environment where access to capital and job creation flourish. This year's Emerging Managers Roundtable brings together asset owners with some of the world's rising asset managers for a wide-ranging, off-the-record conversation about what it takes to build a successful fund, and what emerging trends and opportunities they see in the global marketplace.
Moderator
Kelly Williams, Senior Advisor, GCM Grosvenor
Speakers
Bob Ackerman, Founder and Executive Chairman, Founders Equity Partners
Adam Clammer, Founding Partner, True Wind Capital
Damien Dwin, Co-Founder and Managing Partner, Brightwood Capital Advisors
José E Feliciano, Co-Founder and Managing Partner, Clearlake Capital Group, L.P.
R. Patterson Jackson, CEO and Founder, Sabal Financial Group
Tiffany Kosch, Co-Founder and Managing Director, CenterGate Capital
Rachel Lehman, Co-Founder and Managing Director, P4G Capital Partners
Oleg Nodelman, Founder and Managing Director, EcoR1 Capital
David L. Steinberg, Co-Founder, Managing Partner and Co-Chief Investment Officer, Marlowe Partners LP
Laurie Weir, Investment Director, California Public Employees' Retirement System
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Palm
Corporate America was in the forefront of the campaign for equal treatment of the LGBT community long before the U.S. Supreme Court's historic decision on gay marriage. Yet, many federal, state and local laws haven't caught up with the court, or with big business. Large corporations recently stepped to the forefront again to oppose religious liberty initiatives in several states, with many CEOs threatening to take their business elsewhere unless the laws are changed. Can the model of corporate engagement in the U.S. be applied in other parts of the world to help eliminate persecution while contributing to economic value? Are there lessons for policymakers and multinational corporations from the current debate?
Moderator
Katie O'Reilly, Executive Director, Business and Program Development, Milken Institute
Speakers
Randy Berry, Special Envoy for the Human Rights of LGBTI Persons, U.S. State Department
Beth Brooke-Marciniak, Global Vice Chair, Public Policy, EY
Jason Collins, Retired NBA Player
Fred Hochberg, Chairman and President, Export-Import Bank of the U.S.
Ross LaJeunesse, Global Head of International Relations, Google
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Whittier Room
For years, many governments seemed able to consistently sell the public on the merits of increased trade among nations and the broader concept of globalization of businesses and institutions. But the mood has shifted markedly since the Great Recession. A strong undercurrent in the global debate over income inequality is the question of who really benefits from growing trade. Has it created more and better jobs overall? Or have trade agreements simply fueled a faster "race to the bottom" in the hunt for the lowest-cost labor and the highest possible corporate profit? Trade was supposed to spur faster economic growth. Will the anemic global growth rate since 2008 make it difficult for countries to stay on the path to greater trade, as protectionist sentiment rises? How can policymakers make the case for more trade in this environment? Are regional agreements the smartest way to go, versus broader global discussions? Can globalization survive the post-2008 backlash?
Moderator
Staci Warden, Executive Director, Center for Financial Markets, Milken Institute
Speakers
Victoria Espinel, President and CEO, BSA, Software Alliance; Former U.S. Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator, the White House
Tony Fratto, Partner, Hamilton Place Strategies; Former Deputy Press Secretary, the White House
Francisco González Díaz, CEO, ProMéxico
Clark Roberts, Deputy Minister, Ministry of International Trade, British Columbia, Canada
Stefan Selig, Under Secretary for International Trade, U.S. Department of Commerce
10:00 am - 11:00 am
International Ballroom
The sharing economy is an innovation that grew out of necessity during the Great Recession as thousands of out-of-work men and women looked for ways to replace lost income. Abetted by advances in social technology, the selling and trading of services through Web platforms has rapidly gained traction. Whether it's sharing your home, your car or even your power tools, the Internet has paved the way for collaborative consumption to flourish on a scale never before seen, by empowering entrepreneurs to provide better service at a lower cost than many established businesses. Is this a juggernaut that will prove to be the new normal for doing business? Or will growth of the sharing economy slow as regulators intervene to protect threatened traditional industries?
Moderator
Josh Barro, Senior Editor, Business Insider
Speakers
Stacy Brown-Philpot, CEO, TaskRabbit
Kenny Dichter, Founder and CEO, Wheels Up
Belinda Johnson, Chief Business Affairs and Legal Officer, Airbnb
Alan Krueger, Bendheim Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Princeton University; Former Chairman, White House Council of Economic Advisers
Artie Minson, President and Chief Operating Officer, WeWork
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Dayton
More than ever before, technology has slipped seamlessly into the fabric of daily living. By the time a child is stacking blocks, she's already likely to be playing games on her dad's iPad or manipulating a mouse to learn her ABCs on the family computer. In classrooms, K-12 teachers and university instructors increasingly use gaming and technology to give students a deeper, more interactive and engrossing learning experience. But does it really work for this purpose? What makes a good educational game? Has omnipresent access to digital technology neurologically changed our children's brains? And if so, do gaming modalities better fit the way they're wired? Our panelists will tackle these questions and more, including the big one for many parents: Just how much time in front of the screen is too much?
Moderator
Gary Weisserman, Head of School, Milken Community Schools
Speakers
Nolan Bushnell, Chairman and CEO, BrainRush Inc.; Founder, Atari
Mizuko Ito, Research Director, Digital Media and Learning Research Hub, University of California, Irvine
Jeff Kupperman, Associate Professor, University of Michigan, Flint; Board Member, Institute for Innovation in Education
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Pavilion
What comes to mind when you think of drones? The military predators that kill terrorists in the far reaches of the world? Your neighbor kid's latest (and annoying) toy that hovers over your backyard taking video of you? Or maybe the future world of Amazon delivering your new smartphone to your front door the same day you ordered it? Well, think all of the above and more. The era of drones has arrived, and with it plenty of opportunities -- not only for the burgeoning number of businesses that make drones but for the buyers with myriad uses for them, from filmmakers to ranchers inspecting their 1,000-acre spreads. The problem is not with drones' proliferation (hundreds of thousands have been sold in recent months), but with the lack of clear and sensible regulations by governments trying to catch up with the technology. Without rules in places, many business are loath to invest in drones, whereas eager individuals have no such compunction and may use them in ways that have dangerous consequences (think close encounters with other aircraft). This panel of experts will explore how order can be made of the current chaos without hindering the many potential positives of an industry that's just taking off.
Moderator
Gary Shapiro, President and CEO, Consumer Technology Association
Speakers
Russ Burns, President, Clayco
Lisa Ellman, Partner and Co-Chair, Unmanned Aircraft Systems, Hogan Lovells
Dave Vos, Head of Project Wing, Google X
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Brighton
In the United States, 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, but the "boom" is only the beginning, as people around the world are living longer lives in greater numbers. Questions concerning the effect of aging on our future health, work, finances, lifestyle and communities are more pressing than ever and affect us all. Recently, PBS' Next Avenue recognized 50 extraordinary leaders -- "Influencers in Aging" -- who are redefining the future of aging and what it means to grow old. Global Conference 2016 is fortunate to have several of these Influencers for this panel, which will tackle the challenges and opportunities of increasing longevity as we all search for new ways of living longer, healthier and happier lives.
Moderator
Paula Kerger, President and CEO, PBS
Speakers
Marc Freedman, Founder and CEO, Encore.org
Linda Fried, Dean and DeLamar Professor of Public Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Senior Vice President, Columbia University Medical Center
Ai-jen Poo, Director, National Domestic Workers Alliance; Co-Director, Caring Across Generations
Nora Super, Chief, Programs and Services, National Association of Area Agencies on Aging
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Wilshire Ballroom
No matter what business you're in, success often depends on the ability to continually reinvent your company. But for large legacy companies, whose reputations have been built over many years on a bedrock of brand, company culture and customer service, change is often hard. With thousands of employees, shareholders and customers to worry about, a legacy company requires courage, bold vision and strong leadership to transform its core business. In these disruptive times, companies that have made such major changes to stay competitive span all industries, from retail and airlines to technology and entertainment. This panel will gather executives from some of the world's leading companies to talk about what they're doing to ensure that their organizations stay ahead of the competition.
Moderator
Erik Schatzker, Anchor and Editor-at-Large, Bloomberg Television
Speakers
Hubert Joly, Chairman and CEO, Best Buy Co., Inc.
Federica Marchionni, CEO, Lands' End
Denise Morrison, President and CEO, Campbell Soup Co.
Takeshi Niinami, President and CEO, Suntory Holdings Ltd.
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Canon
The worst Ebola outbreak in history jumps countries and continents and claims 11,000 lives. The mosquito-borne Zika virus races through the Americas, infecting more than a million Brazilians and leaving thousands of infants with microcephaly. In an era of routine global travel, no one seems completely safe. Ebola was beaten back in Africa and international scientists are working on a Zika vaccine, but both viruses exacted a toll far beyond the hospital wards. The fear they create affects global markets and economies as individuals and companies alter travel plans, reconsider investments and delay development projects. Health agencies must divert research and resources from known scourges like tuberculosis to keep the new menaces from becoming pandemics. Join a panel of health and policy leaders as they discuss how the global health system can better respond and prevent pandemics from overwhelming local governments and economies.
Moderator
Cristina Alesci, Correspondent, CNN and CNNMoney
Speakers
Anthony Banbury, Chief Philanthropic Officer, Vulcan Inc.
Dara Erck, Vice President, External Affairs, Aeras
Raul Ruiz, U.S. Representative, California
Rajeev Venkayya, President, Global Vaccine Business Unit, Takeda Pharmaceuticals
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Stardust
The Milken Innovation Center at the Jerusalem Institute serves as a hub for organizing and managing training, research and development collaborations that are designed to produce practical financial solutions. This private session features a progress report from the recent Financial Innovation Labs held in Israel with Californian and Israeli research teams. After the report, participants will discuss future projects focused on food security and agritech, biomedical, health, and clean-energy projects.
Moderator
Shira Eting, Fellow, Milken Innovation Center, Jerusalem Institute; Project Coordinator, Ministry of Economy, Israel
Speakers
Bob Blumenfield, Councilman, Los Angeles
Kathleen Brown, Partner, Manatt, Phelps & Phillips LLP; Former California State Treasurer
Richard Irving, Executive Chairman, Emefcy Group Ltd.; Managing Partner, Pond Venture Partners
David Siegel, Consul General of Israel, Los Angeles
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Beverly Hills Ballroom
Institute Chairman Mike Milken sits down with several of the world's most successful investors to discuss the key insights they've gained and lessons they've learned over the years. How do they adapt to different market cycles? Given that they are, after all, only human, how do they avoid the pitfalls of cognitive biases? Have their best ideas come from extensive analysis or from the gut? How do they think about and manage risk? What do they look for when hiring key members of their teams? And, of course, where are they focusing their attention -- and money -- in the near future?
Moderator
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Speakers
Mark Attanasio, Co-Founder and Managing Partner, Crescent Capital Group LP
Kyle Bass, Chief Investment Officer, Hayman Capital Management
Michael Hintze, Founder, CEO and Senior Investment Officer, CQS
Mitchell Julis, Co-Founder, Co-Chairman and Co-CEO, Canyon Partners, LLC
Sarah Ketterer, CEO and Portfolio Manager, Causeway Capital Management LLC
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Brighton
The expanding population of high-net-worth individuals and families in emerging markets is one of the greatest economic opportunities of the last two decades. As these consumers' sophistication grows along with their wealth, their demand for leading brands, as well as luxury goods and experiences, has mushroomed. At the same time, e-commerce has enabled brands and buyers to interact in new ways, making the relationship more complex and potentially lucrative. But as some elite Western brands have learned, simply showing up in new markets is no guarantee of success. For example, studies have found major differences between Chinese and Indian consumers in what motivates luxury spending. How should luxury brands market their wares across Latin America, Asia and other developing regions? What factors will determine success in the region over the next 10 years?
Moderator
Susan Li, Reporter and Anchor, CNBC
Speakers
Christophe Jouan, CEO, Future Foundation
Lyndon Lea, Managing Partner, Lion Capital
Guilherme Reichmann, Head of Strategy and Planning, Grupo Boticário
Sonu Shivdasani, Chairman and CEO, Soneva
Daniella Vitale, Chief Operating Officer and Senior Executive Vice President, Barneys New York
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Pavilion
Collectors are paying record amounts for works of art, with Picasso's "Les Femmes d'Alger (Version O)" fetching $179 million last year and Modigliani's "Nu Couché" closely trailing at $170.4 million. But the value of art can be measured in many ways beyond money: as part of a city's cultural identity, as a famous collector's legacy or as a family's heirloom. This panel will bring together individuals who are investing in art--as collectors, philanthropists and financiers--to explore this unique asset class. Why are they collecting art? What do they hope to do and achieve with their collections, and how do they ultimately perceive value?
Moderator
Anne Radice, Executive Director, American Folk Art Museum
Speakers
Philip Hoffman, Founder and CEO, Fine Art Fund Group
Deborah McLeod, Director, Gagosian Gallery
Jane Nathanson, Trustee, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Timothy Potts, Director, J. Paul Getty Museum
Lucian Simmons, Senior Vice President, North America and Head of Worldwide Restitution, Sotheby's
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Maple
The last century has seen advances in health that would have been unimaginable to prior generations. Longer lives have led to extraordinary economic growth and great opportunities for personal fulfillment. But the progress is just beginning. The benefits of prevention, wellness, nutrition and exercise are increasingly understood. New health tools are empowering individuals and enabling personalized solutions. An emerging and important body of research is demonstrating that positive attitude and purpose can combat disease and extend life. Each of us has the power to improve our own prospects for a long and healthy life and the chance to contribute to a healthier society. In this session, our experts explain how we can leave Global Conference with better health and more understanding than we had on arrival.
Moderator
Paul Irving, Chairman, Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging; Distinguished Scholar in Residence, Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California
Speakers
Patricia Boyle, Neuropsychologist, Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center
Loretta DiPietro, Professor and Chair, Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University
Becca Levy, Professor of Epidemiology, Social and Behavioral Sciences Division, Yale School of Public Health; Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology, Yale University
Freda Lewis-Hall, Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Pfizer
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Dayton
Millions of the good jobs now and in the future will require high-tech skills, but in the U.S. there is a shortage of young people prepared to step into those roles. Many high schools are struggling to graduate students proficient in STEM knowledge -- in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Those disciplines are crucial to 21st century skills, including computer programming, robotics, medical technology and the operation of advanced machinery. Yet the U.S. Department of Education says only 16 percent of American high school seniors are proficient in math and interested in a STEM career. One obstacle is the lack of curricula, teachers and enrichment programs to challenge and inspire students in STEM concepts from an early age. In response, a growing number of for-profit and not-for-profit organizations are cropping up to fill the void. Learn more about some of the innovative initiatives and organizations that are working to expand access to STEM, and how these efforts can be scaled up to make a substantive difference.
Moderator
Caroline Fairchild, New Economy Editor, LinkedIn
Speakers
Kimberly Bryant, Founder and Executive Director, Black Girls Code
Brent Bushnell, CEO, Two Bit Circus; Board President, Trash for Teaching
Thomas Kalil, Deputy Director for Policy, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy
Stanley Litow, President, IBM International Foundation and Vice President, Corporate Citizenship and Corporate Affairs, IBM
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Whittier Room
Solving the world's most intractable problems isn't just about great ideas and great intentions -- it requires a bolder way of thinking and doing. The most effective change-makers have learned to use their influence and resources in innovative ways to inspire others to join the crusade. Who are these visionaries taking risks, forging unexpected partnerships and changing the world? What can they teach us about inspiring and empowering others to take action? And how can we all challenge ourselves to better utilize our collective power to recognize and address the hardships others face?
Moderators
Maria Shriver, Journalist; Founder, Shriver Media; Activist
Sheryl WuDunn, Co-Founder, FullSky Capital; Co-Author, "China Wakes" and "A Path Appears"
Speakers
Jalyssa Alvarado, Advocate
Kathy Ireland, Chair, CEO and Chief Designer, kathy ireland Worldwide
Lauren Miller Rogen, Actor; Writer; Co-Founder, Hilarity for Charity
Seth Rogen, Actor; Writer; Co-Founder, Hilarity for Charity
Mark Shriver, President, Save the Children Action Network
Elizabeth Simons, Chair, Heising-Simons Foundation
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
International Terrace
If your sports viewing has been limited to the Masters, the NBA playoffs or Major League Baseball, you're missing the world's fastest-growing spectator sport--eSports. With more than 100 million online viewers, professional video gaming has exploded. Team owners spend millions of dollars to buy and support teams in leagues throughout the Americas, Europe and Asia. Just as in traditional sports, eSports seasons culminate in championship tournaments that are viewed online and in sold-out arenas. Colleges are also getting in on the act. The University of California, Irvine, is building an eSports arena and, along with other schools, will offer academic scholarships to players. Revenues are surging, too. The global eSports market is predicted to increase 43 percent in 2016 to $463 million, and more than double by 2019 to $1 billion. Online advertising is up 100 percent over 2014. Yet this very non-traditional industry faces growing pains and the challenge of establishing ancillary revenue streams, such as endorsements, that are found in other pro sports. Panelists will discuss this challenge and other issues such as player unions, broadcast rights and how to create more value without alienating fans.
Moderator
Julia Boorstin, Senior Media and Entertainment Correspondent, CNBC
Speakers
Brandon Beck, Co-Founder and Co-CEO, Riot Games
Kevin Lin, Chief Operating Officer, Twitch
Gregory Milken, Managing Director, March Capital Partners; Co-Owner, Immortals
Matt Wolf, Vice President, Entertainment, Ventures and Strategic Alliances, the Coca-Cola Co.
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Palm
The Golden State has long been synonymous with great leaps in aerospace innovation. Even as the industry has consolidated since the end of the Cold War, costing a large number of aerospace manufacturing jobs, California has remained a center of cutting-edge design and production in the fields of manned aircraft, drones, rockets, satellites and other sectors. Likewise, NASA's presence remains significant with facilities such as JPL. But with many other states competing for aerospace design and manufacturing operations, California can't afford to rely on its historical appeal to the industry. What does the future look like for aerospace in the state? How can lawmakers ensure that California remains a leader in aerospace innovation? What advantages does it have in competing for industry jobs -- and what are its biggest drawbacks? Which sectors hold the greatest potential for job growth? Space tourism, perhaps? Drone development? Military cybersecurity?
Moderator
Jane Wells, Reporter, CNBC
Speakers
Kellie Johnson, President, Ace Clearwater Enterprises
Jim Simpson, Senior Vice President, Strategy and Business Development, Aerojet Rocketdyne
Jakob van Zyl, Associate Director, Project Formulation and Strategy, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA
George Whitesides, CEO, Virgin Galactic and the Spaceship Co.
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Wilshire Ballroom
Uber is 7 years old. Twitter is 10. Facebook and Google are just a few years older. These companies, now embedded in our economy and culture, went from Bright Idea to Next Big Thing to Really, Really Big Deal in almost a flash. Each has changed the way people live and conduct business across the planet. Innovation and new technologies continue to outpace our expectations -- and our ability to keep up. So what's the next big thing? Will virtual reality, for example, live up to its promise? Equally important, what's the next big disappointment? Google Glass? Perhaps Apple Watch? No one knows for sure, but our panel of Silicon Valley experts will provide an inside look at promising technologies that could be part of our lives within the next decade.
Moderator
Ken Hausman, Managing Director, Hausman Ventures
Speakers
Yobie Benjamin, Member, Federal Reserve Bank Faster Payments Task Force, World Economic Forum; Co-Founder, Avegant
Bo Ewald, President, D-Wave U.S.
Skip Rizzo, Director for Medical Virtual Reality, USC Institute for Creative Technologies
Rose Schooler, Vice President, IoT Strategy and Integrated Products Division, Internet of Things Group, Intel Corp.
Arvind Sodhani, Founder and Managing Partner, Silver Trail Ventures
12:30 pm - 2:30 pm
International Ballroom

Physicist/philosopher Thomas Kuhn famously observed that scientific progress is not always incremental --periodic revolutions lead to exponential progress. The term he coined, "paradigm shift," can be applied to what is occurring in medicine today. In brief multimedia talks, leading scientists will present the details of exciting technology revolutions that promise earlier diagnoses, better treatments, longer lives and new cures for age-old diseases. They will show that researchers have adopted entirely new ways of thinking as they move forward with innovative approaches to medicine. After the presentations, Institute Chairman Mike Milken will bring the speakers back to the stage for a panel dialogue.
Introduction By
Margaret Anderson, Executive Director, FasterCures, a Center of the Milken Institute
Moderator
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Speakers
Vadim Backman, Walter Dill Scott Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University
Elizabeth Blackburn, Nobel Laureate; President, Salk Institute
Juan Enriquez, Managing Director, Excel Venture Management
Jack Gilbert, Professor of Surgery and Director, Microbiome Center, University of Chicago
Nina Tandon, CEO and Co-Founder, EpiBone; Co-Author, "Super Cells: Building With Biology"
2:45 pm - 3:45 pm
Whittier Room
In 2014, California Gov. Jerry Brown and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu launched the California-Israel Global Innovation Partnership, a strategic alliance aimed at meeting such global challenges as water scarcity, agricultural productivity, low-carbon energy alternatives, and improved health, education and cybersecurity. Many of California's and Israel's world-class assets are involved, including research parks, technology incubators, universities and laboratories. The goal is to build public policies, create novel business models and develop innovative financing to help deploy solutions to the challenges facing these two dynamic, technology-driven economies. This panel of business, scientific and government leaders will report on the progress to date as well as some of the partnership's ideas for fueling economic growth, raising productivity and reducing poverty and inequality.
Moderator
Glenn Yago, Senior Fellow and Founder, Financial Innovations Labs, Milken Institute; Senior Director, Milken Innovation Center, Jerusalem Institute
Speakers
Naty Barak, Chief Sustainability Officer, Netafim
Mark Gold, Associate Vice Chancellor for Environment and Sustainability, University of California, Los Angeles
Jay Keasling, Associate Laboratory Director for Biosciences, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Hubbard Howe Jr. Distinguished Professor of Biochemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley
Uri Mingelgrin, Professor Emeritus, Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, Israel
Yitzhak Peterburg, Chairman, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.
2:45 pm - 3:45 pm
Beverly Hills Ballroom
The globalization of media and entertainment has generated a financial windfall for content producers. Amid the uncertainty that clouds much of the global economy, the market for media and entertainment content stands out. Global sales of movie tickets hit an all-time high of $38 billion last year, fueled by a 49 percent increase in China. Helped along by expanding digital markets, worldwide revenue for media and entertainment is forecast to grow about 5 percent a year through 2019. Globalization also is providing new sources of funding to pay for productions. But the global marketplace also presents challenges for content producers, who now must make movies and programs that appeal to increasingly sophisticated consumers across diverse cultures. It's not enough to know if a movie or TV show will "play in Peoria." It has to play in Beijing, Mumbai and Moscow as well. This panel of leading figures in global media will discuss how to harness the trends that are shaping the nature of content, as well as how the content is increasingly financed and who is likely to watch it.
Moderator
Julia Boorstin, Senior Media and Entertainment Correspondent, CNBC
Speakers
Mellody Hobson, President, Ariel Investments LLC; Chairman, DreamWorks Animation SKG Inc.
Richard Lovett, President, Creative Artists Agency
Leslie Moonves, Chairman, President and CEO, CBS Corp.
Jeff Shell, Chairman, Universal Filmed Entertainment Group
2:45 pm - 3:45 pm
International Terrace
Despite economic slowdowns, emerging and developing nations still accounted for 70 percent of global growth in 2015. This can be attributed to investments in human capital, growing youth and middle class populations, technology adoption, more responsive governments and other recent transformations. This panel of global entrepreneurs, activists and government officials will discuss the key ingredients for continued growth in developing regions. What significant changes are occurring in the developing world today -- and what key opportunities and challenges to growth and prosperity will define the next decade? What types of policies and practices are needed to unlock the potential of developing markets? And what is required of local businesses, government and the international community?
Moderator
Matthew Bishop, Senior Editor, Economist Group
Speakers
Cherie Blair, Founder, Cherie Blair Foundation for Women
Joseph Boateng, Chief Investment Officer, Casey Family Programs
Marcela Meirelles, Managing Director, Emerging-Markets Sovereign Research, TCW
A.B.C. Orjiako, Chairman, Seplat Petroleum Development Co.
2:45 pm - 3:45 pm
Wilshire Ballroom
Across the planet, bridges and highways built generations ago cry out for repair, construction cranes dot horizons, two of the largest canals in the world are being expanded, and demand spirals for electricity. Global investment in such projects is about $2.7 trillion a year -- about a trillion short of what is needed. This demand is presenting new opportunities for investors. Publicly traded funds and public-private partnerships have become major sources of long-term capital for massive, multibillion-dollar projects. While complications and uncertainties vary from project to project and region to region, there is much for the movers and shakers to learn from one another. Financial panelists will share success stories and talk about difficulties faced in funding the diverse array of infrastructure projects in their portfolios.
Moderator
Rick Newman, Columnist, Yahoo Finance
Speakers
Andrew Claerhout, Senior Vice President, Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan
Kathy Hahn, Assistant Director, Opportunistic Fixed-Income and Inflation-Sensitive Portfolios, North Carolina Department of State Treasurer
Saadia Khairi, Co-Head, Emerging Asia Fund, IFC Asset Management Co.
Scott Mackin, Managing Partner and Co-President, Denham Capital
Gregory Smith, President and CEO, InstarAGF
2:45 pm - 4:00 pm
International Gallery
The hefty costs of long-term care can exceed more than $80,000 a year, an expense that can quickly erode savings or require family members to leave their jobs to provide care. Long-term care insurance can help, but premiums are high, consumer uptake is minimal and many people remain unprepared for this potential expense. The fragmented nature of delivery and funding of long-term care further aggravates the problem. Finding workable solutions requires collaboration from stakeholders in policy, aging, health care and the private sector. In this private session, experts from those fields will convene to discuss ways to deliver long-term care options that patients and industry alike can afford.
Moderators
Sindhu Kubendran, Senior Research Analyst, Health Economics Research, Milken Institute
Perry Wong, Managing Director, Research, Milken Institute
Speakers
Gretchen Alkema, Vice President, Policy and Communications, the SCAN Foundation
G. Lawrence Atkins, Executive Director, Long-Term Quality Alliance
Marc Cohen, Chief Research and Development Officer, LifePlans
Nora Super, Chief, Programs and Services, National Association of Area Agencies on Aging
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
International Ballroom
At the Global Conference, more than 700 distinguished panelists in some 200 sessions will offer a wide range of opinions on the challenges--and solutions--that will determine "The Future of Humankind." But as Harry Truman famously said about being president of the United States, "The buck stops here." In this closing general session, leaders with sharply divergent views will say what they'd do if they were sworn into office on Jan. 20, 2017, and they'll pull no punches. How would they deal with income inequality, terrorism, religious freedom, the Supreme Court, immigration, climate change, health-care costs, education, regulation, labor relations, trade policy and other issues that have energized and divided voters in the current tempestuous campaign?
Moderator
Michael Milken, Chairman, Milken Institute
Speakers
Tilman Fertitta, Chairman and CEO, Fertitta Entertainment Inc.
Jeff Greene, Investor and Philanthropist
Frank Luntz, Founder and President, Luntz Global
Ellen Tauscher, Strategic Advisor, Baker Donelson; Former U.S. Representative, California; Former U.S. Under Secretary of State
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Poolside - West
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Peninsula Hotel - Belvedere Patio
Thursday, May 5, 2016
8:30 am - 3:00 pm
Stardust
In America and much of the world, a massive demographic shift is accelerating as populations age at an unprecedented rate due to advances in medicine, sanitation and safety. With the support of the John Templeton Foundation, the Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging is proud to host the Purposeful Aging Summit. An extraordinary, first-of-its-kind gathering, the Summit includes recognized leaders in health, education, business, philanthropy, policy and media who share a focused interest in changing the public narrative about the roles and value of older adults and the benefits of purposeful aging for individuals and the broader society.
Moderator
Paul Irving, Chairman, Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging; Distinguished Scholar in Residence, Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California
Speakers
Karabi Acharya, Director, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Arthur Bilger, Founder and CEO, WorkingNation
Patricia Boyle, Neuropsychologist, Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center
Barbara Bradley Hagerty, Author; Journalist
Laura Carstensen, Professor of Psychology and Fairleigh S. Dickinson Jr. Professor in Public Policy, Stanford University; Director, Stanford Center on Longevity
Henry Cisneros, Chairman, Executive Committee, Siebert Brandford Shank & Co., LLC; Chairman, CityView; Former Secretary, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Catherine Collinson, President, Transamerica Institute and Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies
Ken Dychtwald, President and CEO, Age Wave
Richard Eisenberg, Managing Editor, Nextavenue.org, PBS
John Feather, CEO, Grantmakers in Aging
Marc Freedman, Founder and CEO, Encore.org
Linda Fried, Dean and DeLamar Professor of Public Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Senior Vice President, Columbia University Medical Center
Laura Geller, Senior Rabbi, Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills
Susan Gianinno, Chairman, North America, Publicis Worldwide
Lynn Goldman, Michael and Lori Milken Dean, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University
John Gomperts, President and CEO, America's Promise Alliance
Kerry Hannon, Author and Columnist; Expert in Career Transitions and Retirement
Michael Hodin, CEO, Global Coalition on Aging; Managing Partner, High Lantern Group
Carol Hymowitz, Editor-at-Large, Bloomberg News
Ina Jaffe, Correspondent, NPR
Paula Kerger, President and CEO, PBS
Sherry Lansing, CEO, Sherry Lansing Foundation; Founder, EnCorps Teachers Program
Becca Levy, Professor of Epidemiology, Social and Behavioral Sciences Division, Yale School of Public Health; Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology, Yale University
Freda Lewis-Hall, Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Pfizer
David Linde, CEO, Participant Media
Donald Miller, Leonard K. Firestone Professor of Religion and Co-Founder, Center for Religion and Civic Culture, University of Southern California
Ai-jen Poo, Director, National Domestic Workers Alliance; Co-Director, Caring Across Generations
Kimon Sargeant, Vice President, Human Sciences, John Templeton Foundation
Wendy Spencer, CEO, Corporation for National and Community Service
Trent Stamp, CEO, Eisner Foundation
Lester Strong, Vice President, Experience Corps and External Affairs, AARP Foundation
Nora Super, Chief, Programs and Services, National Association of Area Agencies on Aging
Fernando Torres-Gil, Professor of Social Welfare and Public Policy and Director, Center for Policy Research on Aging, University of California, Los Angeles
John Whyte, Director, Professional Affairs and Stakeholder Engagement, U.S. Food and Drug Administration
John Zweig, Chairman, Health Care and Specialist Communications, WPP Group

   
   


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