Associates

The Milken Institute Associates is a network of top supporters from corporate, governmental, economic and philanthropic organizations. Members of the Milken Institute Associates are actively involved in our programs and receive special invitations to private events. They are provided access to the annual Global Conference, regional Summits in California, London, Asia, and MENA, and the Future of Health Summit. Most importantly, their support and generosity increase global prosperity. For information about joining the Associates click here

2004

10

February 2004

Off the Record with Andras Simonyi, the Hungarian ambassador to the United States

Santa Monica

Andras Simonyi, the Hungarian ambassador to the United States, reiterated his country's support for America in its war against Iraq, saying it is important to stand behind its ally.

"The relationship between the United States and Hungary has never been closer, never been better," said the ambassador during a private meeting with members of the Milken Institute Associates.

The ambassador added, however, that he is sorry to see the rift between the U.S. and its longtime allies France and Germany over the war, since it's important that the Trans-Atlantic relationship remain strong.

While Hungary has supported the U.S. decision on Iraq, it has also worked hard to maintain its good relationship with Germany, its key partner in Europe.

The ambassador also talked about Hungary's joining the European Union later this year. He said his country will be a vocal and active member of the EU.

"We'll be there to help and make a difference," he said.

Ambassador Simonyi touched on a variety of other issues, including immigration, demographics, investments in Hungary and the economy.

He joined the Foreign Ministry in 1989. Prior to becoming ambassador, he headed the NATO Liaison Office in Brussels. He was a key player in preparing Hungary for accession to NATO and in 1999, he became the first Hungarian permanent representative on the NATO Council. He is vice president of the Hungarian Atlantic Council, co-founder of the Center for Euro-Atlantic Integration and Democracy, and was Hungary's representative to the Western European Union Council for five years.

The meeting was one of a series that allows members of the Associates to meet privately with local, national and international leaders.

Learn more about the Milken Institute Associates.

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20

January 2004

Invest Australia

Santa Monica

In conjunction with Invest Australia and the Australian Consul General, the Milken Institute hosted a private breakfast on Jan. 20, 2004, that offered a view of Australia's business and investment scene.

The meeting, being held as part of Australia Week 2004, featured Alexander Downer, Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs; David Hill, Chairman and CEO of Fox Sports Television Group; and Thomas Lynch, Managing Director of Wilshire Private Markets Group.

Downer talked about the Australian economy, trade, FTA progress with China, Singapore, Thailand, and the U.S., security and international relations.

Hill addressed the cultural, social and business synergies that exist between Americans and Australians.

Lynch provided investment insight on doing business in Australia as an investor and funds manager.

The event was part of the Institute's ongoing series of meetings with leaders of distinction and members of the Milken Institute Associates.

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2003

13

November 2003

Off the Record with Douglas Holtz-Eakin, Director, Congressional Budget Office

Santa Monica

Douglas Holtz-Eakin, Director of the Congressional Budget Office, told members of the Milken Institute Associates that his office spends a lot of time studying the impact of proposed legislation on the federal budget. They must also deal with numerous requests from members of Congress to analyze specific issues, such as the cost of the war in Iraq. And there are the ongoing analyses of pending policy issues such as trade and financial market regulation.

But while all of these tasks are vital, the elephant in the room these days is the federal budget deficit, he said.

"All of these discussions take place within the context of the budget outlook for the U.S.," Holtz-Eakin said.

For the current fiscal year, the deficit is expected to reach $480 billion. Next year, it is projected to be $350 billion. Deficits will continue to decline until about 2012, when a balanced budget is finally reached. In 2013, we should finally see a surplus again, he said.

But, he emphasized, these projections are based on current laws — some of which undoubtedly will change. Policy, he said, is the big uncertainty in trying to figure out where the federal budget is headed.

Holtz-Eakin, whose nonpartisan agency is responsible for providing Congress with budget and economic analyses, discussed a broad range of issues that could change these projections, from tax cuts to entitlement programs such as Social Security and Medicare. How Congress deals with these issues will greatly impact these projections.

Holtz-Eakin began his four-year term in February 2003. Before that, he was chief economist for the President's Council of Economic Advisers, where he was also senior staff economist for two years.

The meeting was one of a series that allows members of the Associates to meet privately with local, national and international leaders.

Learn more about the Milken Institute Associates.

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11

September 2003

Off the Record with Steve Westly, California State Controller

Santa Monica

State Controller Steve Westly, speaking at a private meeting with members of the Milken Institute Associates, called the current political and economic upheaval in California "an extraordinary time" that requires common sense leadership and bipartisan solutions.

He warned that failure to solve the state's budget problems could lead to serious consequences in the near future, and he urged compromise on both sides.

"This state has become too divisive, too partisan," Westly said.

Among his main issues are:

  • changing the process of redistricting, which in the hands of politicians has led to fewer and fewer competitive races, causing an increase in political extremism;
  • extending term limits, whose current constraints have caused a loss of some of the Legislature's most knowledgeable leaders; and
  • open primaries, which will lead to more moderate candidates.

Despite our current woes, he remains extremely optimistic about California's future, added Westly, the former eBay executive.

"The economy is coming back," he said. "I'm confident the state will come back as strong as ever."

The meeting was one of a series that allows members of the Associates to meet privately with local, national and international leaders.

Learn more about the Milken Institute Associates.

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25

June 2003

Off the Record with William Bratton, LAPD Chief

Santa Monica

Los Angeles Police Chief William Bratton, speaking at a private meeting with members of the Milken Institute Associates, said he is trying to change the culture and size of the department so that he can deal with three major issues:

 

  • implement the consent decree to reform the police department;
  • reduce violent crime, particularly gang crime; and
  • address terrorism and employ preventive measures.

To be successful, he said, the city needs a bigger police department — now at about 9,200 sworn officers, the smallest of the country's major cities — and a greater sense of urgency in getting things done.

"Too few for too long had been asked to do too much with too little," Bratton said. "The ultimate challenge is to change a culture than has been resistant to change."

Bratton, the former police commissioner of Boston and New York City who was appointed LAPD chief in October 2002 by Mayor James Hahn, conceded that changing such a large bureaucracy is not easy, especially in a city as diverse and complex as Los Angeles. But he is "cautiously optimistic" about succeeding.

The meeting is one of a series that allows members of the Associates to meet privately with local, national and international leaders.

Learn more about the Milken Institute Associates.

Read More